Cases reported "Soft Tissue Infections"

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1/4. aeromonas sobria infection with severe soft tissue damage and segmental necrotizing gastroenteritis in a patient with alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    A 49-year-old man, who had a 3-year history of liver dysfunction but had not been treated, was admitted to the hospital with a sudden onset of fever and generalized muscle pain. He subsequently developed generalized purpura with scattered hemorrhagic bullae of the skin and massive bloody stools. aeromonas sobria was proven by culture of both blood and bullous fluid. In spite of the extensive treatment with antibiotics and other medications in the intensive care unit (ICU), the patient went into septic shock and died 2 days after admission. Pathological examination on autopsy revealed segmental necrotizing gastroenteritis with bacterial colonies and alcoholic liver cirrhosis, in addition to extensive severe soft tissue damage involving cellulitis and rhabdomyolysis and epidermolysis. Although the prognosis for vibrio vulnificus infection with severe soft tissue damage in patients with liver cirrhosis, malignancy, diabetes mellitus or other pre-existing diseases is poor, the unfavorable progression of aeromonas species, especially A. sobria infection is rare. This is thought to be the first report of an autopsied case.
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2/4. lymphoma masquerading as infection.

    During surgical training, medical students and residents constantly are reminded to culture every suspected tumor and send tissue for pathologic evaluation for every suspected abscess. A diagnosis of cancer can be missed easily if this procedure is not followed, delaying the diagnosis and possibly adversely affecting the patient's prognosis. The confusion also may be compounded by a sterile abscess, positive culture results or a negative biopsy specimen. Therefore it is imperative to do a biopsy and a culture on any suspect lesion. An additional workup and possible biopsy may be warranted for a nonhealing wound that has been treated appropriately. The cases of three patients with lymphoma that were treated as infectious processes are presented. In all three instances, the appropriate treatment was delayed because of a delay in diagnosis.
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3/4. Necrotizing soft tissue infection of the thigh: consider an abdominal cause.

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI) is a disastrous infection of the subcutaneous tissue and underlying fascial layers. Even if urgent treatment is started, mortality rates are high. Due to the paucity of specific cutaneous signs, early recognition is extremely difficult. This in turn causes a delay in diagnosis and worsens prognosis. Although NSTI can develop after a wide variety of causes, specific clues such as initial gram staining and a high index of suspicion should alert the clinician to an abdominal causative agent, which alters surgical treatment strategy. If detected early, prognosis for the patient is improved. methods: Four patients with NSTI of the thigh due to an abdominal origin are detailed regarding their clinical presentation, gram stain or culture, abdominal focus, and treatment. Based on our clinical experience and a review of the relevant literature, we address clinical challenges and controversies of importance. RESULTS: Current literature on NSTI recommends prompt surgical debridement and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Our cases revealed that an abdominal focus is not uncommon; however, it can be easily missed, which delays treatment. All cases demonstrated polymicrobial gram stains and cultures, which can raise suspicion of and lead to determination of an abdominal focus. CONCLUSIONS: High clinical suspicion or a polymicrobial gram stain or culture should quickly lead to determination of an abdominal source. Early surgical exploration and focus treatment, together with prompt surgical debridement and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, could reduce mortality significantly.
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4/4. head and neck mycetoma.

    Two cases of eumycotic mycetomas in the head and neck region are reported. The first case is the localized mycetoma which involved only the soft tissue of the neck. It was completely excised and the patient needed no further treatment. In the second case, the lesion extensively involved the structures in the parapharyngeal space, submandibular space and carotid sheath. The upper limit is the skull base. The patient was treated by combination of wide excision with radial forearm flap and antifungal agents, however, the prognosis is fair.
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ranking = 1
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