Cases reported "Soft Tissue Neoplasms"

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1/357. Ewing's sarcoma of the soft tissues? Case report.

    A case is reported of a malignant tumour of the soft tissues of the leg, with histological and pathological features comparable with those of Ewing's sarcoma of bone. This extension of the term Ewing's sarcoma to the soft tissues is proposed and the differential diagnosis is discussed.
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keywords = bone
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2/357. Gingival metastasis from a prostate adenocarcinoma: report of a case.

    prostate cancer is the cause of 10% of cancer-related deaths in males in the united states. Metastases are found late in the course of the disease. Metastatic tumors of the oral cavity are rare, representing about 1% of oral tumors and affect jaws much more frequently than soft tissues. Metastatic prostate cancer tends to involve the bones of the axial skeleton. In a recent review, 22 cases of metastases to the jawbones from prostate cancer were found in 390 cases. On the other hand, only 1 case of a metastasis to the oral soft tissues was reported. The authors describe the second case of oral soft tissue metastasis from a prostate cancer. The metastatic lesion was located in the gingiva. Clinicians should be aware of oral soft tissue metastases since they can be the first sign of a not yet diagnosed malignant tumor and they can be very easily confused with several different benign lesions.
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3/357. US and CT findings of multicentric leiomyosarcomatosis.

    This article presents a case of leiomyosarcomatosis with widespread lesions involving the soft tissues and the most unlikely organs such as thyroid and salivary glands, pancreas, ligamentum teres, bladder wall, and bones without lymph node or distant metastasis. The CT and US findings of this rare phenomenon are discussed with regard to the literature.
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4/357. Resolved splenic accumulation of Tc-99m HMDP after recovery of disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Unusual, intense splenic radioactivity was seen on bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m HMDP in a 14-year-old boy with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation. Abnormal splenic radioactivity was resolved after recovery from the disseminated intravascular coagulation. During treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation and tumors, the patient received repeated blood transfusions, resulting in iron overload, but this did not prevent the abnormal splenic uptake from resolving. This case indicates that disseminated intravascular coagulation may be a cause of splenic accumulation of bone-seeking agents, and that abnormal splenic uptake can be resolved.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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5/357. Tumor-induced osteomalacia and symptomatic looser zones secondary to mesenchymal chondrosarcoma.

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia is a rare clinical entity that is associated with soft-tissue or skeletal tumors. We present a case report of a patient with a chest wall mesenchymal chondrosarcoma who presented with bone pain. The patient had skeletal changes in the femoral neck and fibula consistent with osteomalacia and laboratory values suggesting phosphate diabetes. The patient was treated with tumor resection and phosphate supplementation with reversal of the signs and symptoms of osteomalacia. Tumor-induced osteomalacia is vitamin-D-resistant and often reversed by complete removal of the tumor. Most commonly, the causative tumors are of vascular, mesenchymal, or fibrous origin. The osteomalacia is associated with bone pain, muscle weakness, and radiographic changes. Tumor-induced humoral factors have been implicated in causing the osteomalacia, but the definite etiology has yet to be determined. Current treatment includes complete tumor resection and electrolyte supplementation.
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keywords = bone
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6/357. Primary clear cell sarcoma of bone: a unique site of origin.

    Clear cell sarcoma is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, accounting for less than 1% of soft tissue sarcomas. We are presenting a case of a clear cell sarcoma of bone which, to our - knowledge, is the only report of a , primary clear cell sarcoma of bone.
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keywords = bone
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7/357. A case report on aggressive fibromatosis with bone involvement.

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a locally infiltrative fibroblastic tumour that arises from fascial planes of soft tissue but does not metastasize. It is known to invade muscle, subcutaneous tissue and neurovascular structures. However, bone involvement is very rare and there has been few reports of bone involvement. We present a case of a young man with aggressive fibromatosis of the right lower leg with fibula involvement.
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keywords = bone
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8/357. A case of soft tissue mesenchymal chondrosarcoma metastatic to skin, clinically mimicking keratoacanthoma.

    We report the first case of metastatic involvement of the skin by a soft tissue mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (MS). A 64-year-old man presented 15 months after resection of a 7.0 cm MS from his left forearm with a rapidly growing, erythematous nodule on the left side of the upper lip. The lesion was clinically interpreted as a keratoacanthoma. The histologic appearance was identical to that of the soft tissue MS; an immunohistochemical stain for CD99 was positive. lung and bone metastases were subsequently documented. Our case expands the differential diagnosis of malignancies with cartilaginous differentiation that can involve the skin.
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9/357. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of hemangiopericytoma: A report of five cases.

    BACKGROUND: hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a relatively rare neoplasm, accounting for approximately 2.5% of all soft tissue tumors. Its histopathology has been well documented but to the authors' knowledge reports regarding its fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology rarely are encountered. In the current study the authors report the cytologic findings in FNA specimens from nine confirmed cases of HPC and attempt to correlate the cytologic features with the biologic outcomes. methods: FNA was performed with or without radiologic guidance. Corresponding sections of tissue were reviewed in conjunction with the cytologic preparations. RESULTS: Nine FNAs were performed in 5 patients (3 men and 2 women) with an age range of 38-77 years (mean, 56 years). Two lesions were primary soft tissue lesions arising in the lower extremities; seven were recurrent or metastatic lesions from bone (one lesion), kidney (one lesion), pelvic fossa (one lesion), lower extremities (two lesions), trunk (one lesion), and breast (one lesion). All aspirates were cellular and were comprised of single and tightly packed clusters of oval to spindle-shaped cells aggregated around branched capillaries. basement membrane material was observed in 6 cases (67%). The nuclei were uniform and oval, with finely granular chromatin and inconspicuous nucleoli in all cases except one. No mitotic figures or areas of necrosis were identified. A correct diagnosis of HPC was made on one primary lesion and all recurrent or metastatic lesions. CONCLUSIONS: HPCs show a spindle cell pattern in cytologic preparations and must be distinguished from more common spindle cell lesions. The presence of branched capillaries and abundant basement membrane material supports a diagnosis of HPC. immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy performed on FNA samples may be helpful in the differential diagnosis. FNA is a useful and accurate tool with which to confirm recurrent or metastatic HPC; however, prediction of the biologic behavior of HPC based on cytologic features is not feasible. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathol) copyright 1999 american cancer society.
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10/357. Malignant haemangioendothelioma of bone in a HbSC disease patient--a case report.

    We report here a 35-year-old man with sickle cell disease (SCD), who presented in 1989 with pain in the (R) hip of 7 years duration and swelling of the (R) calf of 3 months duration. Clinical examination revealed a hard tender mass in the (R) calf. histology of the (R) calf mass revealed haemangioendothelioma (HE), similar to the histology of the (R) iliac bone mass obtained in another institution previously. He was treated with external radiotherapy with the 1.25 megavoltage beam to antero-posterior fields of the (R) hemipelvis and (R) calf, with good response. Chemotherapy was subsequently administered using 6 cycles of VAC regime. The patient remained in remission for 12 months. In 1991 he had lymphoedema of (R) lower limb and received further radiotherapy and chemotherapy after an isotope bone scan had revealed disease activity in the (R) hemipelvis, (R) femur and (L) upper tibia. He responded again with complete regression of the lymphoedema and remained well until April 1993 when the lymphoedema recurred. He died while being evaluated for further treatment. Although there is no evidence to suggest that SCD confers any protection from development of neoplasms, the co-existence of SCD with a neoplasm is not common. We consider the occurrence of HE of bone, a rare malignancy, in a HbSC patient worthy of reporting.
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keywords = bone
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