Cases reported "Somatosensory Disorders"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/15. Lower lip numbness due to peri-radicular dental infection.

    Lower lip numbness has always been a sinister symptom. Much has been written about it being the sole symptom of pathological lesions and metastatic tumours in the mandible. It may also be a symptom of manifestations of certain systemic disorders. A case of lower lip numbness resulting from the compression of the mental nerve by a peri-radicular abscess is presented because of the unusual nature of this spread of infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/15. Miniplate osteosynthesis and cellular phone create disturbance of infraorbital nerve.

    A 37-year-old man with a zygomatic fracture underwent surgical treatment with reduction of the fracture and osteosynthesis with a miniplate on the infraorbital rim. Postoperatively, he had numbness in the distribution area of the infraorbital nerve, but he also suffered from dysesthesia in the same area during periods when he was using his hand-held mobile phone. After surgical removal of the osteosynthesis plate, the dysesthesia associated with his mobile phone was no longer present. The plate was examined in a setup where we measured the electric current that developed on the surface of the plate under the influence of the magnetic field between the phone antenna and the metal plate. The highest currents measured on the actual plate were 141 mV in air, and 21 mV in saline. These findings indicate that there might have been a correlation between the presence of the miniplate close to the infraorbital nerve, and the dysesthesia experienced by the patient, under the influence of the energy emitted from the cellular phone.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/15. Somatosensory and skin temperature disturbances caused by infarction of the postcentral gyrus: a case report.

    Somatosensory functions are subdivided into 2 large groups: the elementary somatosensory functions, which consist of light touch, pain, thermal sensation, joint position sense, and vibration sense, and the intermediate somatosensory functions, which include 2-point discrimination, tactile localization, weight, texture, and shape perception. In this report, we describe a patient with somatosensory dysfunction after infarction of the postcentral gyrus. On physical examination a month after the onset of the infarction, voluntary movements were skillful, and both the elementary and intermediate somatosensory functions were disturbed in the right hand. The patient also displayed a decrease in the skin temperature of the right hand. The sensory-evoked potential in response to electrical stimulation of the right median nerve was normal, and brain MRI showed that the infarction was located in the posterior half of the left postcentral gyrus. These findings suggested that the lesion was situated at areas 1 and 2, and that area 3b was preserved. thermography revealed that the skin temperature of the right hand was decreased predominantly on the ulnar side, and that recovery from cooling with ice water was delayed. By comparing the results of our patient with a case report that showed no disturbance of the elementary somatosensory functions with a localized lesion in the postcentral gyrus, we suggest that area 1 participates in the elementary somatosensory functions and that skin temperature may be controlled somatotopically in the somatosensory cortex.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/15. Anomalous superficial radial nerve: a patient with probable autosomal dominant inheritance of the anomaly.

    The sensory symptoms due to lesions of the superficial branch of the radial nerve are usually limited to the dorsolateral area of the hand. We describe a 40-year-old woman who presented with numbness of the dorsomedial aspect of the right hand following arthroplasty of the wrist. Clinically, the sensory loss suggested a lesion of the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve. However, nerve conduction studies showed that the sensory loss was due to a lesion of a branch of the superficial branch of the radial nerve. The patient had bilateral, anomalous innervation of the dorsum of the hand-the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve could not be demonstrated with nerve conduction techniques and the superficial branch of the radial nerve innervated most of the dorsum of the hand. Antidromic stimulation of the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve and superficial branch of the radial nerve with paired surface recording of sensory nerve action potentials from the dorsolateral (radial side) and dorsomedial (ulnar side) hand is useful for evaluating this anomaly. Our patient had two children, one of them with a similar anomaly. This suggests an autosomal dominant inheritance of the anomaly.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 14
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/15. Referred sensations in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to explore and characterize referred sensations (RS) in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 and test the hypothesis that pain in CRPS is associated with central sensory changes. methods: Subjects underwent standardized neurological examination involving light touch, pinprick and vibration sense with eyes closed and then with eyes open. The subjects described the location and sensation emanating from the stimulated site and whether they experienced any sensations (similar or different) elsewhere. RESULTS: Five of 16 subjects recruited demonstrated RS. These were experienced in real time, were modality specific (touch and pinprick) and were located on the body part immediately adjacent, on Penfield's cortical homunculus, to the stimulated site. The RS were diminished or absent when the subject visualized the stimulated area. They disappeared when stimulation ceased and on clinical improvement. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of RS in CRPS and provides further evidence of central reorganization in what was previously thought to be a peripheral disorder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5707401040383
keywords = peripheral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/15. Motor excitability in a patient with a somatosensory cortex lesion.

    OBJECTIVE: We report a patient with an ischemic lesion in right somatosensory cortex who developed dystonic posturing and pseudo-athetotic involuntary left-sided finger movements during voluntary muscle contractions. methods: Motor excitability was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques and electrical peripheral nerve stimulation. Results obtained from abductor digiti minimi muscles of both hands were compared. RESULTS: On the affected side, silent period duration and intracortical inhibition were reduced, indicating a loss of inhibitory properties. Intracortical facilitation was enhanced. Stimulus-response curves showed a smaller increase of motor evoked potential amplitudes when recorded during muscle relaxation, but not during voluntary muscle activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that, under normal conditions, somatosensory cortex modifies inhibitory as well as excitatory properties in the motor system.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6.9459411044718
keywords = peripheral nerve, peripheral, nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/15. Use of a forced-choice test of tactile discrimination in the evaluation of functional sensory loss: a report of 3 cases.

    The loss of sensation is not an uncommon associated finding after injury to the peripheral nerves and the spinal cord. However, the sensory examination is prone to the influence of nonphysiologic factors, and one cannot use it to determine whether functional sensory loss reflects unconscious or intentional symptom production. This distinction has important implications for differential diagnosis and for decision making in the context of workers' compensation claims and personal injury litigation. We present 3 cases of patients with chronic pain and nondermatomal patterns of loss of fine-touch sensation, whose sensory loss was examined by a sensory forced-choice symptom validity test. Their below-chance scores showed intentionally produced sensory symptoms. The use of this methodology in differential diagnosis is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6.9459411044718
keywords = peripheral nerve, peripheral, nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/15. Congenital trigeminal anaesthesia.

    Two patients with congenital trigeminal nerve anaesthesia are described. The first (male, aged 14 years) had an isolated unilateral loss of sensation in all three divisions of the trigeminal nerve with no other abnormalities. The second patient (male, aged 3 years 6 months) had bilateral loss of sensation in all three divisions of the trigeminal nerve, associated with other neurological abnormalities. No explanation for their abnormalities was found. The Rosenberg classification of congenital trigeminal anaesthesia is discussed with reference to these patients and also with reference to the developmental biology of the trigeminal nerve.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/15. Peripheral neuropathy--a rare complication of paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Peripheral neuropathy is an uncommon complication in paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We report the case of a 10-year-old Chinese girl who developed peripheral neuropathy within 3 months of the onset of SLE and presented with bilateral foot drop and sensory symptoms of both hands and feet. There was no involvement of the central nervous system at the time of presentation. The patient was negative for anticardiolipin antibodies, but positive for lupus anticoagulant. She was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral steroids, methotrexate, gabapentin and amitryptyline. Although peripheral neuropathy is a rare complication of paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus, one should be vigilant for this entity as part of the neurological spectrum. It may not be associated with involvement of the central nervous system. Antiphospholipid antibodies may have role in the pathogenesis of SLE associated peripheral neuropathy. We speculate that routine nerve conduction studies may have a role in detecting sub-clinical cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 68.531034985423
keywords = peripheral neuropathy, peripheral, neuropathy, nerve, nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/15. Isolated vitamin e deficiency with demyelinating neuropathy.

    A 22-year-old man, with a past history of generalized tonic-clonic seizures treated with phenobarbital, presented with spinocerebellar ataxia. The electrophysiological studies revealed a demyelinating motor-sensory neuropathy. The serum vitamin E level was low. sural nerve biopsy revealed loss of large myelinated fibers with evidence of remyelination. Vitamin E supplementation led to clinical and electrophysiological recovery of sensory conduction and evoked potentials. Motor nerve conduction, however, showed only partial recovery. vitamin e deficiency leading to a demyelinating neuropathy, as in the present case, suggests that the full spectrum of the disease entity is not fully defined.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 13.715959676665
keywords = neuropathy, nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Somatosensory Disorders'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.