Cases reported "Speech Disorders"

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1/18. Acquired and isolated asymmetrical palatal palsy.

    Benign acquired and isolated asymmetrical palatal palsy is a rare condition in childhood. We report on three cases. Typical features include: sudden onset, abnormality of the palatal components of speech (rhinolalia), nasal escape of fluids from the ipsilateral nostril. It is supposed to be caused by viral infection, but attempts at viral isolation were unsuccessful. Complete spontaneous recovery is usual, taking a few weeks. Our paper seems to be the first report of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in this condition. It did not disclose any abnormalities in the 2 cases in which it was performed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = palsy
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2/18. Foix-Chavany-Marie (anterior operculum) syndrome in childhood: a reappraisal of Worster-Drought syndrome.

    Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome (FCMS) is a distinct clinical picture of suprabulbar (pseudobulbar) palsy due to bilateral anterior opercular lesions. Symptoms include anarthria/severe dysarthria and loss of voluntary muscular functions of the face and tongue, and problems with mastication and swallowing with preservation of reflex and autonomic functions. FCMS may be congenital or acquired as well as persistent or intermittent. The aetiology is heterogeneous; vascular events in adulthood, nearly exclusively affecting adults who experience multiple subsequent strokes; CNS infections; bilateral dysgenesis of the perisylvian region; and epileptic disorders. Of the six cases reported here, three children had FCMS as the result of meningoencephalitis, two children had FCMS due to a congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome, and one child had intermittent FCMS due to an atypical benign partial epilepsy with partial status epilepticus. The congenital dysgenetic type of FCMS and its functional epileptogenic variant share clinical and EEG features suggesting a common pathogenesis. Consequently, an increased vulnerability of the perisylvian region to adverse events in utero is discussed. In honour of Worster-Drought, who described the clinical entity in children 40 years ago, the term Worster-Drought syndrome is proposed for this unique disorder in children.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = palsy
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3/18. Idiopathic facial paralysis: a review and case study.

    A holistic approach to patient care encourages oral health care professionals to look at each client's overall needs. Dental hygiene practitioners need to be aware of the causes of facial paralysis, current diagnostic techniques, treatment options and how the paralysis may be affecting a patient's emotional status. This article describes the oral health concerns of clients with idiopathic palsy, and how they can be assisted.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = palsy
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4/18. Progressive bulbar palsy: a case report diagnosed by lingual symptoms.

    The aim of this report is to show a case of Progressive Bulbar Palsy (PBP), diagnosed by oral medicine specialists, from oral symptoms of the disease. We have found no more than two published cases of PBP diagnosed by lingual alterations. We have followed the patient for almost four years, which is remarkable considering that the normal survival period for these patients is up to three years. We would like to emphasize the role of general dentists in the diagnosis of systemic conditions based on an oral examination that should include the oro-facial muscles.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = palsy
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5/18. Delayed hypoglossal palsy following occipital condyle fracture--case report.

    Occipital condyle fractures are rare. When present, they produce lower cranial palsies and/or brainstem dysfunction. A 32 year old man sustained multiple injuries. At the time of admission the patient had no neurological deficits. Three weeks after the accident, the patient complained of slurring of speech. Clinical examination revealed an isolated hypoglossal palsy. Radiological evaluation revealed an occipital condyle fracture. The patient was treated with a rigid collar. Eighteen months after the injury, the patient noted slight improvement in his speech. However, clinical examination showed a persistent hypoglosssal palsy. Occipital condyle fractures are rare. They may be associated with lower cranial nerve palsies. As demonstrated by this case, this entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of hypoglossal palsy. Since occipital condyle fractures can exist without neurological deficits, special attention should be paid to imaging of the craniovertebral junction in patients with head injury.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = palsy
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6/18. The effectiveness of grammar instruction for individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication systems: a preliminary study.

    This study examined the effectiveness of an instructional program designed to teach grammar skills to individuals who communicated via augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). A single-subject, multiple probe across behaviors design was used to measure the effect of the instructional program on the acquisition and maintenance of the skills learned. Two adults with cerebral palsy participated in the study. The instructional program was used to teach 2 grammatical forms to each participant. Word order in adjective phrases and inversion of the auxiliary do in wh- questions was targeted for 1 participant; use of possessive pronouns and inclusion of to when using infinitives as modal verbs was targeted for the second participant. The instructional program was shown to be effective. Both participants learned to produce the grammatical forms taught. One participant maintained these skills for at least 2 months after the completion of instruction; the other participant required additional instruction in order to maintain the skills learned. Although based on a small sample, the results suggest that intervention can help individuals who use AAC improve their grammar skills. Limitations of the study are discussed, along with directions for future research.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = palsy
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7/18. Operculum syndrome in childhood: a rare cause of persistent speech disturbance.

    An infant is described who developed operculum syndrome during an acute encephalitic illness. Presenting symptoms were cortical pseudobulbar palsy and focal seizures of facial origin. Persistent mutism--with normal language comprehension and orofacial motor disturbance--were the main neurological sequelae. Similarities between this case and other permanent or transient causes of cortical pseudobulbar palsy are discussed, as well as the possible relationship with certain types of childhood language disorders.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = palsy
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8/18. Bilateral opercular syndrome and crossed aphemia due to a right insular lesion: a clinicopathological study.

    A right-handed male patient suddenly noted lower bilateral facial and lingual palsy, and inability to masticate and swallow, but with preserved automatic functions. He was mute, communicating only through writing, but verbal comprehension was normal (aphemia). On anatomopathological examination, an ischemic infarction of the entire right insula, with mild extension to the fronto-temporoparietal operculum was observed. The left hemisphere was normal. The clinical findings suggest a bilateral opercular syndrome due to a right hemisphere lesion and a crossed aphemia.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = palsy
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9/18. Clinical and acoustical variability in hypokinetic dysarthria.

    Ten male patients with parkinsonism secondary to Parkinson's disease or progressive supranuclear palsy had clinical neurological, speech, and acoustical speech evaluations. In addition, seven of the patients were evaluated by x-ray computed tomography (CT) and (F-18)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Extensive variability of speech features, both clinical and acoustical, were found and seemed to be independent of the severity of any parkinsonian sign, CT, or FDG PET. In addition, little relationship existed between the variability across each measured speech feature. What appeared to be important for the appearance of abnormal acoustic measures was the degree of overall severity of the dysarthria. These observations suggest that a better understanding of hypokinetic dysarthria may result from more extensive examination of the variability between patients. Emphasizing a specific feature such as rapid speaking rate in characterizing hypokinetic dysarthria focuses on a single and inconstant finding in a complex speech pattern.
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ranking = 452.83619904198
keywords = progressive supranuclear, supranuclear, supranuclear palsy, palsy
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10/18. DAF as instrumental treatment for dysarthria in progressive supranuclear palsy: a case report.

    In this case study, a 59-year-old male with progressive supranuclear palsy and hypokinetic dysarthria wore a small, solid state, battery operated, delayed auditory feedback device to reduce speech rate and to aid speech intelligibility. time series measurements were made from tape recordings taken at the beginning of treatment and again after three months of daily wearing of the device. Measures of speech rate, intensity, and overall intelligibility indicate that when the instrument is worn, the subject's speech is slowed, vocal intensity increases, and intelligibility is markedly improved. The subject and his family report satisfaction with the instrument. The application of delayed auditory feedback to the treatment of communication disorders is discussed.
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ranking = 2264.1809952099
keywords = progressive supranuclear, supranuclear, supranuclear palsy, palsy
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