Cases reported "Speech Disorders"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. tooth wear and loss: symptomatological and rehabilitating treatments.

    The authors report a clinical case that presented tooth wear and absence, with painful muscular and articular symptomatology, and also alteration in deglutition, mastication and speech. The clinical procedures used were re-establishment of vertical dimension of occlusion, mandibular centric relations, and occlusal contacts through therapeutic removable partial dentures. The condyle position was analyzed in habitual occlusion and in occlusion with dentures, through transcranial radiographs of the temporomandibular joints. Oral rehabilitation was achieved with dental restoration and removable partial dentures.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = vertical
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. multiple sclerosis and oral care.

    multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Common early symptoms include visual disturbances, facial pain or trigeminal neuralgia and paraesthesia or numbness of feet, legs, hands and arms. These, plus symptoms of spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. Increasingly a multi-disciplinary team approach is used where the individual, if appropriate his/her carer, and the specialist nurse are key figures. The dental team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.54988689911324
keywords = transmission
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. The contribution of electromyography to the diagnostics of some rare palatal anomalies.

    The paper presents the electromyographic (EMG) findings of the soft palate in three patients: a patient with Mohr syndrome and cleft palate, a patient with palatal asymmetry and rhinolalia and a patient with vertical oro-ocular facial cleft with marked asymmetry of the cleft palate. In the first patient, electrical silence was registered in one half of the palate. In the second patient, moderate loss of active motor units was registered in the hypoplastic part of the palate. In the third patient, in spite of asymmetry, the EMG finding was normal on both sides of the palate.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = vertical
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. A case of open bite with Turner's syndrome.

    The treatment of a skeletal Class III open bite malocclusion with Turner's syndrome is described. Although the patient had a negative overbite of 9 mm, a positive overbite of 2 mm was obtained through treatment, without any tooth extractions; however, an excessive vertical growth of the anterior regions was noted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = vertical
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. male-to-male transmission of the velo-cardio-facial syndrome: a case report and review of 60 cases.

    The velo-cardio-facial syndrome is one of the most common syndromes of clefting. Previous reports have shown vertical pedigree transmission, but in all cases the gene was maternally transmitted. The genetics of this syndrome had been suspected as autosomal dominant, but X-linked dominant inheritance could not be ruled out. This report describes an instance of male-to-male transmission of the velo-cardio-facial syndrome. In addition, the clinical findings in 60 cases are reported to further delineate the phenotypic spectrum of the syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.2993213946794
keywords = vertical, transmission
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. Functions of the centre section (trunk) of the corpus callosum in man.

    The case is reported of a patient in whom the middle sagittal third of the corpus callosum had been removed for the treatment of an underlying angioma. The special advantages of the case are that the patient is a young, relatively healthy person of normal IQ. The angioma had not interfered with interhemispheric transmission and the patient was described as neurologically normal before operation. After operation left-side neglect and extensive somatic disconnection were seen. A change in the balance between the hemispheres for handedness and ear superiority in dichotic listening was observed. The patient developed an aphasia after operation characterized by a simplification of language, the inavailability of complex ideas and emotional communication. He showed a disorder of memory--'autopragmatic amnesia'--in whice. The patient showed disorders of visuo-spatial transfer. These symptoms are thought to typify a syndrome of the centre trunk region of the corpus callosum, to follow as a direct function of the operation performed upon the callosum, and to illustrate the function of this region of the brain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.54988689911324
keywords = transmission
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. Craniofacial and extracranial malformations in the klippel-feil syndrome.

    The klippel-feil syndrome is of special interest to those concerned with cleft palate for the following reasons: (1) cleft palate is a commonly associated finding: (2) malformations of the cervical vertebrae, in the absence of other stigmata of the syndrome, are a common finding in cleft palate; (3) anomalies of the upper cervical column and cranial base can impede velopharyngeal valving; (4) hearing loss is a common finding in the syndrome irrespective of the presence or absence of cleft palate; (5) cervical anomalies may complicate endotracheal intubation or head extension during pharyngeal surgery, and (5) the short neck may be the primary defect that impedes palatal fusion. This report reviews the literature on 339 patients and seven new cases in an effort to catalog the cranial and extracranial malformations associated with the syndrome and to consider the mode of genetic transmission.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.54988689911324
keywords = transmission
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. The syndrome of 'pure akinesia' and its relationship to progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Five patients developed a stereotyped syndrome of progressive akinesia of gait, speech, and hand-writing without rigidity, tremor, or dementia. The symptoms did not improve with levodopa. These clinical findings conform to a syndrome described repeatedly in japan since 1974 as "pure akinesia." Evidence has indicated that pure akinesia often represents a pre-ocular motor, and in some cases an ocular motor-sparing, form of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Although we found disorders of eyelid movements, none of the patients demonstrated a gaze palsy on clinical examination. Four patients underwent eye movement recordings. The two patients with the longest disease duration had slow or small vertical saccades. These findings support the notion that patients with pure akinesia may develop a vertical gaze palsy, similar to that in PSP, late in their course. Our patients show that pure akinesia occurs in north america as well as in japan. Recognition of the syndrome of pure akinesia may suggest the diagnosis of PSP before the development of abnormalities of ocular movement.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = vertical
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Speech Disorders'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.