Cases reported "Spinal Cord Compression"

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1/14. Solitary exostosis of the thoracic spine. early diagnosis and treatment.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report. OBJECTIVE: To highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of vertebral exostosis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Few cases of spinal cord compression caused by solitary thoracic exostoses have been reported. METHOD: A solitary exostosis in the midline of the neural arch of the fifth thoracic vertebra, causing compression of the spinal cord documented on both magnetic resonance and computed tomographic examinations, is reported in a 51-year-old woman who had normal findings in a neurologic examination. RESULTS: The exostosis was successfully excised. CONCLUSION: Accurate preoperative diagnosis of vertebral exostoses is possible using magnetic resonance and computed tomography. Early excision avoids the development of a permanent neurologic deficit.
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2/14. Treatment of cervical cord compression, caused by hereditary multiple exostosis, with laminoplasty: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report. OBJECTIVES: Successful excision of the exostosis within the spinal canal. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Myelopathy caused by exostosis within the spinal canal developed in a 13-year-old boy with hereditary multiple exostosis. methods: Spinous process-splitting laminoplasty with an ultrasonic knife was performed to remove the mass and minimize the possibility of postlaminectomy kyphosis. RESULTS: The spinal canal exostosis with cervical cord compression was excised successfully with laminoplasty. After surgery there has been no recurrence of tumor, and the stability of the cervical spine has been preserved. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of laminoplasty as a useful surgical approach for intraspinal exostosis to prevent postoperative cervical instability.
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ranking = 1.2857142857143
keywords = exostosis
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3/14. Thoracic vertebral body exostosis as a cause of myelopathy in a patient with hereditary multiple exostoses.

    The posterior thoracic vertebral body appears to be a novel origin for an exostosis causing myelopathy. A patient with hereditary multiple exostoses and myelopathy caused by an exostosis originating from the posterior aspect of the T5 vertebral body was treated with a staged anterior decompression/corpectomy and posterior spinal fusion. The patient had near-complete resolution of his myelopathy immediately after undergoing removal of the exostosis through a right-sided lateral thoracotomy approach. This was a unique origin for an exostosis causing spinal cord compression in a patient with hereditary multiple exostoses. The delivery of the exostosis was performed en bloc during the anterior decompression and corpectomy portion of the surgery. This resulted in the expected favorable outcome.
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keywords = exostosis
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4/14. Cervical myelopathy caused by an exostosis of the posterior arch of C1.

    We report a case of vertebral osteochondroma of C1 causing cord compression and myelopathy in a patient with hereditary multiple exostosis. We highlight the importance of early diagnosis and the appropriate surgery in order to obtain a satisfactory outcome.
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keywords = exostosis
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5/14. spinal cord compression due to vertebral osteochondroma: report of two cases.

    osteochondroma, or exostosis, is the most common of all benign bone tumors. Spinal osteochondromas are uncommon but may cause neurological compromise. We report two cases of spinal cord compression by osteochondromas. One patient was a 17-year-old man with hereditary multiple exostoses who was presented with spastic paraparesis, a sensory level at T3-T4, and a pyramidal syndrome. Vertebral exostosis was suspected by magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by histological examination. Surgical decompression was followed by complete resolution of the neurological impairments. The other patient was a 19-year-old man with spastic paralysis of the right lower limb and a pyramidal syndrome. Whereas magnetic resonance imaging suggested a neurofibroma, histological features were those of osteochondroma. Nine months elapsed from symptom onset to surgery. This delay led to residual neurological impairments, which resolved almost completely after rehabilitation therapy. Vertebral osteochondromas contribute only 1.3-4.1% of all osteochondromas. The lesion may be solitary or a manifestation of hereditary multiple exostosis. magnetic resonance imaging shows the exact location of the lesion, most notably with relation to neighboring neurological structures. spinal cord compression is uncommon and usually has a favorable outcome provided surgical decompression is performed before major neurological damage develops.
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ranking = 0.42857142857143
keywords = exostosis
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6/14. Single cervical exostosis. Report of a case and review of the literature.

    The authors present a rare case of solitary cervical osteochondroma. Because of its rarity and its predilection for the atlantoaxial area, the diagnosis may be overlooked in evaluating patients having cervical myelopathy. Surgical decompression usually improves the patient's neurologic status.
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ranking = 0.57142857142857
keywords = exostosis
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7/14. Myelopathy due to osteochondroma: MR and CT studies.

    A 9-year-old boy with multiple osteochondromas developed progressive transverse myelopathy. magnetic resonance imaging and CT demonstrated an exostosis at C7-T1 with cord compression.
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keywords = exostosis
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8/14. Acute spinal cord compression in hereditary multiple exostoses: case report.

    A case of hereditary multiple exostoses with spinal cord compression by a costal exostosis is reported in a 12-year-old boy. paraplegia is an unusual complication of hereditary multiple exostoses. In the patient with spinal cord signs, the offending exostoses should be defined with appropriate roentgenograms and myelographic and CT scanning investigations.
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keywords = exostosis
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9/14. Hereditary multiple exostoses and cervical cord compression: CT and MR studies.

    Hereditary multiple exostoses usually involve the long bones, but occasionally the spine. When the spine is involved, serious neurologic deficits may occur. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with an exostosis in the cervical spine (C5), which caused a spastic quadriplegia.
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keywords = exostosis
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10/14. paraparesis in hereditary multiple exostoses: case report.

    The authors report a case of hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) with neurologic complications, and review the literature. A 23-year-old man exhibited a worsening spastic paraparesis with sphincter dysfunction. The cranial nerves and the exteroceptive and deep sensations were apparently undamaged. The family history, the physical examination, and the systemic radiologic examination revealed all the characteristics of HME. The neurologic complication was caused by an exostosis, arising from the C2 right hemilamina, compressing the spinal cord. The patient quickly improved after a laminectomy.
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keywords = exostosis
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