Cases reported "Spinal Cord Injuries"

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1/159. Cervical spinal cord injury in sapho syndrome.

    Cervical spinal fracture and pseudarthrosis are previously described causes of spinal cord injury (SCI) in patients with spondylarthropathy. SAPHO (synovitis Acne Pustulosis hyperostosis osteitis) syndrome is a recently recognized rheumatic condition characterized by hyperostosis and arthro-osteitis of the upper anterior chest wall, spinal involvement similar to spondylarthropathies and skin manifestations including palmoplantar pustulosis and pustular psoriasis. We report the first case of SAPHO syndrome disclosed by SCI related to cervical spine ankylosis.
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keywords = fracture
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2/159. Double spinal cord injury in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Ankylosing spondylitis patients are more prone to spinal fractures and these fractures commonly result in mobile nonunion. We report a patient with a 30-year history of ankylosing spondylitis who sustained double spinal cord injuries following minor trauma. The first injury occurred at the lumbar level due to pseudoarthrosis of an old fracture, and the second at the thoracic level following cardiopulmonary arrest and an episode of hypotension. The possible mechanisms of the injuries are discussed and maintaining normal blood pressure in these patients is emphasized.
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keywords = fracture
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3/159. Ascending myelopathy in the early stage of spinal cord injury.

    A 30-year-old healthy woman was involved in a road traffic accident. She sustained a fracture dislocation of T11/12 with a complete Frankel A paraplegia below T11. She had no associated injuries. High Dose methylprednisolone was administered according to the NASCIS III protocol (48 h) together with low molecular weight heparin and gastroprotected medication. Complete transection of the spinal cord and an anterior haematoma from T11 to T12 were confirmed on X rays, CT's and MRI scans. Posterior surgical stabilisation was performed using Isola instrumentation, starting 8 h post injury. Her post surgical period was uneventful except for some episodes of low blood pressure (85/60 mmHg) from which she had no symptoms. On the 12th post operative day, while in the physiotherapy department, she complained of right scapular pain. This occurred every time she was sat up and was associated with paraesthesia of both upper limbs. Two days later she deteriorated neurologically and her level ascended initially to T8 and then to T3. MRI of the spine with and without gadolinium showed spinal cord oedema between C3 and T1. There was no evidence of haemorrhage or syringomyelia. The authors discussed this case making different hypotheses. They are mainly the following: (1) Gradually ascending ischaemia due to a vascular disorder; (2) Double spinal trauma; (3) Ischaemia related to repeated hypotensive episodes; (4) Low grade intramedullary tumour; and (5) Thrombus of the Radicularis Magna artery. The case has been recognised as being very rare and interesting. In the conclusions, the presenting author stresses the importance of adopting MRI-compatible instrumentation for the surgical stabilisation of the spine, and careful monitoring of blood pressure during the acute phase of spinal cord injury. Dr Aito agrees with Mr El Masry about the opportunity of forming a group of clinicians in order to discuss protocols to cope with this devastating complication.
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keywords = fracture
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4/159. High expression of MHC I in the tibialis anterior muscle of a paraplegic patient.

    A long-term paraplegic man presented exclusively (>99%) myosin heavy chain I (MHC I) in the tibialis anterior muscle (TA). This was coupled to a slow speed of contraction, a high resistance to fatigue, and a rapid resynthesis of phosphocreatine after an electrically evoked fatiguing contraction when compared with the TA muscles of 9 other paraplegic individuals. In contrast, the MHC composition of his vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles was that expected of a muscle from a spinal cord injured individual. This information may be of clinical importance in terms of the expected morphological and functional adaptations of skeletal muscle to different types of electrical stimulation therapy.
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ranking = 0.0070908387036552
keywords = fatigue
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5/159. Traumatic induced total myelomalacia of the cervical spinal cord associated with a space-occupying subdural hematoma.

    We report the case of a 20-year-old male driver who suffered from a trauma to the cervical vertebral column in a head-on collision with a tree. The injuries included subluxation of the 2nd and 3rd cervical vertebrae and fracture of the odontoid process of the axis with ventrally directed displacement of the proximal fragment and dorsally directed displacement of the distal fragment. Already at admission to hospital a space-occupying spinal subdural hematoma was diagnosed. Clinically, paraplegia was diagnosed with progressive loss of consciousness. pneumonia led to death 40 days after the accident. autopsy disclosed a total myelomalacia of the cervical spinal cord obviously resulting from an ischemia caused by a traumatic lesion of the dorsal truncus arteriosus spinalis as well as a compression by the spinal subdural hematoma.
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keywords = fracture
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6/159. An unusual cause of spinal cord injury: case report and discussion.

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that alters every aspect of the victim's life. Motor vehicle accidents cause about half of the cases, whereas others are the result of falls, recreational and sporting accidents, or acts of violence. We report a case of a C3 spinal fracture with a resultant Brown Sequard syndrome, which occurred in a unique manner and could have easily been prevented. There is a need for the medical community to play a more active role in educating the public to prevent accidents that lead to these catastrophic injuries.
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keywords = fracture
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7/159. A comparison of FES with KAFO for providing ambulation and upright mobility in a child with a complete thoracic spinal cord injury.

    This study compared functional and physiologic measures of ambulation and upright mobility with functional electrical stimulation (FES) versus knee-ankle-foot-orthoses (KAFO) in an 11-year-old boy with a T-10 level spinal cord injury. The child was a limited community ambulator with bilateral KAFO and loftstrand crutches. The FES system consisted of percutaneous intramuscular electrodes controlled by a portable stimulator and thumbswitch, an AFO for ankle and foot support, and loftstrand crutches. The subject used a swing-through gait pattern with both modes of mobility. The Functional Independence Measure scoring system and time to completion were used to compare performance in 6 standardized activities: donning, high transfer, inaccessible toilet transfer, ascend/descend stairs, and floor-to-standing transfer. Ten repeated measures were performed for each mode. Physiologic measures included energy expenditure, postural stability using forceplates, and a Functional Standing Test (FST). The subject performed all 6 mobility activities independently with FES and KAFO. In 4 of 6 activities, there was a trend toward faster times with FES, but this was not statistically significant. Toilet transfers and stair descent were performed significantly faster with KAFO. There was no difference in completion times on the activities of the FST. Measures of postural sway suggested that the subject was more stable with KAFO during quiet standing, while the modes were equal during a dynamic activity (raising arm for functional use). Energy expenditure results revealed no significant difference in oxygen cost per meter but a significantly higher oxygen consumption rate per minute for FES. Ambulation with both modes was performed at levels consistent with strenuous exercise. Maximum ambulation distances were relatively equal while the subject's velocity was significantly faster with FES. Of note, the subject reported ceasing ambulation during maximum distance trials due to general fatigue when using FES and due to shoulder pain with KAFO ambulation. For this subject, FES provided a means of performing upright mobility tasks independently, comparable with that of KAFO, while providing a faster ambulation velocity and a potential means of cardiovascular training.
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ranking = 0.0070908387036552
keywords = fatigue
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8/159. Traumatic transverse fracture of sacrum with cauda equina injury--a case report and review of literature.

    Fractures of the sacrum are rare and generally associated with fracture of the pelvis. Transverse fractures of the sacrum are even less frequent and neurological deficit may accompany these fractures. A case of transverse fracture sacrum with cauda equina injury treated by sacral laminectomy and root decompression, is reported.
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ranking = 8
keywords = fracture
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9/159. Atlantal stenosis: a rare cause of quadriparesis in a child. Case report.

    The authors report the case of a 3-year-old boy who suffered from quadriparesis and respiratory distress after failing to execute a somersault properly. neuroimaging revealed spinal cord contusion with marked spinal canal stenosis at the level of the atlas. No subtle instability, occult fracture, or other congenital abnormalities were confirmed. Spinal cord contusion with marked canal stenosis is rare, and only several adult cases have been reported. Severe stenosis at the level of the atlas may predispose individuals to severe spinal cord contusion, as occurred in our patient after sustaining trivial trauma.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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10/159. Stretching (?) of the spinal cord as a cause of paraplegia in a patient with Cushing's syndrome.

    paraplegia with a total anesthesia level was found in a patient who had Cushing's syndrome. There was marked osteoporosis of the spine and a moderate wedge shaped compression fracture of the T4 vertebral body but no stenosis of the canal could be observed. On the grounds of the CT findings stretching of the spinal cord caused by the rapidly evolving kyphosis of the thoracic tract has been thought to be the responsible factor of the clinical deficits.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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