Cases reported "Spinal Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/747. Conus medullaris hematomyelia associated with an intradural-extramedullary cavernous angioma.

    A unique case of a 50-year-old woman with a conus medullaris hematomyelia associated with a low thoracic intradural-extramedullary cavernous angioma localized 2 cm above is reported. The patient had a 2-month history of progressive paraparesis, hypoesthesia of legs, and bowel and bladder disturbances. The symptoms worsened acutely during the last days before admission. A thoraco-lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion at T10-T11 (vertebral interspace associated with a hematomyelia localized about 2 cm below. A T10-L1 laminectomy was performed and complete removal of both lesions was obtained with microsurgical technique. A non-traumatic hematomyelia should always prompt the suspicion of a spinal AVM or, more rarely, of a cavernous angioma. The possible anatomical and clinical correlations of this unusual association are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/747. Possible manifestation of temporomandibular joint dysfunction on chiropractic cervical X-ray studies.

    OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to show that biomechanical alterations toward and away from normal on x-ray studies may be the result of changes in temporomandibular joint dysfunction and to discuss possible neurologic explanations for this phenomenon. CLINICAL FEATURES: Two patients are discussed; the first had migraine headache symptoms, and the second had chronic hypomobility of mandibular opening, dizziness, headache, and neck pain and stiffness. In both patients mensuration changes in different types of cervical x-ray studies were noted in conjunction with exacerbation of, and elimination of, temporomandibular joint dysfunction. INTERVENTION: Comanagement of these cases was done with dental professionals. chiropractic treatment included vectored/linear, upper cervical, high-velocity, low-amplitude chiropractic manipulation of the atlas vertebra, diversified manipulation, myofascial therapy, stretch and spray procedures, and soft tissue manual techniques. CONCLUSION: temporomandibular joint dysfunction may cause cervical muscular and spinal biomechanical changes that may become visible and change on x-ray examination. Further investigation into this phenomenon is recommended.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/747. Spinal subdural hematoma: a rare complication of lumbar puncture. Case report and review of the literature.

    Spinal subdural hematoma, though rare, is an established complication of lumbar puncture. A young man with persistent back and neck pain after a traumatic lumbar puncture for the diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis is presented. A diagnosis of spinal subdural hematoma at T2 to T8 levels without significant spinal cord compression was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Symptoms resolved after one month of analgesics and muscle relaxants.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/747. Lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts of different etiologies: diagnosis by CT and MR imaging.

    Intraspinal synovial cysts arises from a facet joint and may cause radicular symptoms due to nerve root compression. In the present study, three surgically and histologically proved cases of synovial cyst of the lumbar spine with different etiology are described. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the imaging features of various etiologies of intraspinal synovial cysts allowing a correct preoperative diagnosis. review of the literature enables us to say that to our knowledge, there is no reported article collecting the imaging findings of intraspinal synovial cysts with different etiologies. Only single cases with rheumatoid arthritic or traumatic origin have been reported to date. We believe that computed tomography and particularly magnetic resonance imaging are the methods of choice which provide the most valuable diagnostic information.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/747. Paraspinal abscess following facet joint injection.

    Injection to the zygapophysial joint is a procedure which is performed frequently for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons in the management of back pain. It is generally considered to be free of significant complications. We report a patient who developed a paraspinal abscess following a lumbar facet joint injection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/747. Long-term follow-up of skeletal dysplasia in thalassaemia major.

    We report skeletal changes due to deferoxamine (DF) in 15/29 patients with transfusion-dependent thalassaemia major (TM), followed longitudinally for growth assessment. Clinically the earliest signs were decline in height and/or sitting height growth rate, leg and back pain with restricted movement and limb deformity. Radiologically metaphyseal and spinal changes were seen in 5 subjects and vertebral lesions alone in 10. The metaphyseal changes were mild, moderate or severe and affected all long bones, but were most pronounced at wrists and knees. They progressed from widening of the growth plate and defects of metaphyseal margins to appearance of radiolucent pseudocystic areas and, in severe cases, of cupped, rickets-like metaphyses. The spinal changes proceeded from osseous defects of ventral upper and lower edges of vertebrae and biconvex contours of end-plates to platyspondyly with decreased vertebral body height. After DF dose reduction, metaphyseal changes regressed in 2 patients, while they progressed in 3, requiring corrective surgery for severe valgus knee. Spinal abnormalities either remained unchanged or progressed. Final height was very short in patients with spondylometaphyseal lesions, short and disproportionate in patients with only spinal involvement.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/747. Spinal aspergillus abscess in a patient with bronchocentric granulomatosis.

    aspergillus fumigatus hyphae is often found in the lung tissue of patients with bronchocentric granulomatosis (BCG). This organism is believed to be one agent responsible for inciting the hypersensitivity response and subsequent development of the characteristic pathology that defines BCG. The definitive etiology of this disease, however, remains conjectural. Corticosteroids represent the mainstay of therapy. The fungi recovered from patients with BCG are considered noninvasive; thus, the risk of fungal invasion secondary to steroid-induced immunosuppression is believed to be negligible. However, we report a case of spinal aspergillus abscess that developed in a patient with BCG subsequent to steroid therapy. This case also highlights the necessity for aggressive medical and neurosurgical intervention to avert the development of neurological sequelae.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/747. Intraspinal epidermoid cyst occurring 15 years after lipomyelomeningocele repair. Case report.

    The authors report the case of a spinal epidermoid cyst that developed in a patient who had undergone surgery for lipomyelomeningocele repair 15 years earlier. The patient presented with symptoms of retethering. magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic intraspinal mass that extended from L-2 to L-5. The mass proved to be an epidermoid cyst. Spinal epidermoid cysts can cause retethering after a repair of lipomyelomeningocele, and the risk of this development can be present for decades.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/747. Brucellar spinal epidural abscess.

    Spinal epidural abscesses account for approximately one of every 10, 000 admissions to tertiary hospitals. The midthoracic vertebrae are the most frequently affected, whilst the cervical spine is involved in fewer patients. staphylococcus aureus is identified as the cause in most cases of epidural abscess; other bacteria responsible include gram-negative bacteria, streptococcus species and brucella species. We report the case of a patient with cervical spondylodiscitis at level C4-C5 and an epidural abscess which was compressing the spinal cord and the retropharyngeal space. The previous symptoms of brucellosis were atypical. We discuss the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the case.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/747. diagnosis of Os odontoideum using kinematic magnetic resonance imaging. A case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case of os odontoideum diagnosed using kinematic magnetic resonance imaging is presented. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the kinematic magnetic resonance imaging findings of os odontoideum and the possible use these findings might have to guide treatment. BACKGROUND: Kinematic magnetic resonance imaging is a new imaging modality that is able to produce realtime images of a structure through a range of motion. This makes it well suited for investigating dynamic processes such as cervical instability. methods: A single subject with known os odontoideum was examined using a Sigma SPR Kinematic Magnetic Resonance Imager (General Electric, Florence, SC). RESULTS: Kinematic magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated cervical spinal cord impingement and cervical instability throughout flexion and extension, but not during lateral bending or rotation. CONCLUSIONS: Kinematic magnetic resonance imaging can evaluate the cervical spine in an axially loaded position throughout its range of motion. This modality may be a useful method for diagnosing and classifying abnormalities of the spine.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = spinal
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Spinal Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.