Cases reported "Spinal Dysraphism"

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11/28. latex and chickpea (cicer arietinum) allergy: first description of a new association.

    In this paper we describe the existence of cross-reactivity between allergens from latex and chickpea, a food from the Leguminosae family, which is common in the Mediterranean diet. We present the case report of a spina bifida boy with a clinical relevant food allergy to chickpea (oral syndrome dysphonia), developing after the appearance of latex allergy symptoms (lip angioedema intraoperative anaphylaxis). Specific IgE to latex and chickpea was demonstrated by skin prick tests, measurement of patient's serum specific IgE and IgE-immunoblotting. Cross-reactivity was studied by means of EAST-inhibition and western blotting-inhibition. A strong inhibition was observed in several IgE-binding bands when latex extract was used in solid phase and patient serum was preincubated with chickpea extract (chickpea extract as inhibitor phase). As far as we know, this is the first report of cross-reactivity between latex and chickpea, a food which should therefore be added to the extensive list of latex cross-reactive foods.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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12/28. Faun tail naevus: a cutaneous marker of spinal dysraphism.

    We describe three cases (one male and two females) of faun tail nevi, which is one of the most important cutaneous marker of spinal dysraphism. One of the patients presented with acro-osteolysis leading to auto amputation of the toes of the left foot, which required operative intervention. This lays stress on the early recognition of lumbar paraspinal skin lesions and early treatment to avoid irreversible sequelae.
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keywords = operative
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13/28. adult complex spinal dysraphism with situs inversus totalis: a rare association and review.

    STUDY DESIGN: First published report of an adult complex spinal dysraphism with situs inversus. OBJECTIVES: To describe a previously asymptomatic adult patient of multiple vertebral anomalies with cervical split cord malformation type II, tethering of the spinal cord (cervical and lumbar), and intraspinal arachnoid cyst along with dextrocardia and situs inversus. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Only 5 cases (fetus, 1; neonates, 3; child, 1) of spinal dysraphism with dextrocardia or situs inversus have been reported. All these cases have had associated multiorgan developmental anomalies usually incompatible with survival and requiring multidisciplinary care. methods: The case has been described and relevant literature reviewed. RESULTS: The patient was operated for cervical and lumbar levels in the same sitting. A C4-C5 laminectomy was performed, 2 hemicords enclosed in the same dural sac were visualized, dorsal paramedian nerve roots and the tethering arachnoid bands were cut, and the arachnoid cyst wall was partially excised. This was followed by L4-L5 laminectomy and detethering by sectioning of the thickened filum terminale. The patient showed significant neurologic improvement after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The present case is a rare instance in which there has been an association of adult onset occult spinal dysraphism along with situs inversus totalis. Successful management requires appropriate understanding of embryology, anatomy, and imaging and has implications in neurosurgical and perioperative anesthetic care.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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14/28. Postoperative spinal ultrasonography findings in spinal dysraphia.

    Diastematomyelia is a form of spinal dysraphism involving sagittal clefting of the spinal cord, conus medullaris, and/or filum terminale into two hemicords. It can be an isolated finding or can be associated with meningomyelocele or meningocele. In this report, we present postoperative spinal ultrasonography findings in a patient with diastematomyelia and a tethered cord.
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ranking = 5
keywords = operative
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15/28. Proximally situated osseous septum in complex spina bifida. Case report.

    In Type I split cord malformation (SCM) lesions, the osteocartilaginous spur and its dural sleeve are almost always located in the caudal extent of the median cleft. The authors present a case of lumbar myelomeningocele associated with a thoracic Type I SCM in which an osseous septum is uniquely situated in the proximal extent of the median cleft. Split cord malformations are cord-tethering lesions, which may be associated with a myelomeningocele that causes additional tethering, even in the opposite direction; therefore, both lesions should be treated. In view of this unique case, however, the surgical approach used for tethering lesions in such cases of complex spina bifida should perhaps be tailored. Whenever feasible, meticulous preoperative examination of a patient with spina bifida, including entire craniospinal magnetic resonance imaging followed with perioperative dynamic evaluation, is important for the effectiveness and safety of the surgery.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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16/28. Hyponatremic seizures after suprapubic catheter placement in 7-year-old child.

    We report a case of hyponatremic seizures in a 7-year old boy with spina bifida following cystoscopy and suprapubic catheter placement. Immediate postoperative cystogram and pelvic computed tomogram (CT) after the development of seizures demonstrated a fluid collection from the suprapubic catheter site into the anterior abdominal wall. The subsequent reabsorption of free water from the fluid collection, with the contribution of postoperative hypotonic intravenous fluid administration and possible transient inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) secretion resulted in acute dilutional hyponatremia and consequent seizures. Strategies to prevent hyponatremia in children during urological procedures, with emphasis on the importance of reserving free water as the irrigation fluid are discussed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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17/28. teratoma or enterogenous cyst? The histopathological and clinical dilemma in co-existing occult neural tube dysraphism.

    BACKGROUND: Better understanding of embryology, histopathology and genetics of dysraphic conditions have lead to an expansion of this concept to entities with a similar microscopic appearance (e.g. enterogenous cysts, colloid cyst of the III-rd ventricle) or rated among neoplasms (e.g. mature teratoma), creating a certain conceptual confusion. Currently the diagnosis of "teratoma" is being substituted by "enterogenous cyst" or "teratomatous cyst". AIM OF paper: Clarification of concepts in this field and presentation of the experience of the Department of neurosurgery of the Children's Memorial health Institute associated therewith. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Since January 1990 through April 2005 we had treated 7 children with the final diagnosis of "an enterogenous cyst". The mean age of the children was 10.5 years and the mean follow-up time was 4.1 years. The study was performed by a retrospective analysis of medical records, imaging studies and histological preparations. RESULTS: the study group included: 3 cases of type I enterogenous cyst, 1 case of type II cyst and 3 cases of type III cyst (in 2 cases a former diagnosis of "mature teratoma" has been revised). Within this follow-up time, a good outcome was obtained in 3 cases, moderate disability - in 3 cases and severe disability - in 1 case. CONCLUSIONS: (1) Enterogenous cyst often co-exists with other dysraphic features; (2) Clinical signs of an enterogenous cyst are non-typical and depend on location of the lesion. The presence of secreting gastric mucosa may lead to chemical myelitis; (3) Severity of the postoperative neurological deficit is due to the developmental nature of the lesion and common vascular supply; (4) Late results of treatment are satisfactory, provided the lesion is excised radically; (5) Enterogenous cyst may be diagnosed in the case of a tumor composed of tissues originating from 1, 2 or 3 embryonic layers coexisting with dysraphic stigmata, congenital vertebral abnormalities or a mediastinal tumor of the same type. Types II and III of enterogenous cyst were historically diagnosed as "adult teratoma".
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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18/28. Non-dysraphic intramedullary spinal cord lipoma.

    True intramedullary spinal cord lipomas are extremely rare. Two cases of intramedullary spinal cord lipoma are presented. The patients did not exhibit any form of spinal dysraphism. The patients presented with gait difficulty, upper limb weakness, sphincter disturbance, dysesthesias and neck pain. The tumors were removed sub-totally and the neurological grade improved postoperatively in one of the patients.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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19/28. frontal bone agenesis in a patient of spinal dysraphism.

    Associated cranial abnormalities with spinal dysraphism are not uncommon. We came across an unusual case of a 1-year-old male child with spinal dysraphism having lumbar meningomyelocele, who also had split cord malformation (hemicord with intervening bony spur) with lipoma of one of the hemicord and filum terminale. The patient also had communicating hydrocephalus without Chiari malformation and also near-total frontal bone agenesis. Single photon emission computed tomography scanning of brain revealed normal perfusion. In the first stage of repair, the patient had postoperative CSF leak for which ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was performed. This constitutes a rare anomaly associated with spinal dysraphism.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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20/28. Neurological bypass for sensory innervation of the penis in patients with spina bifida.

    PURPOSE: Most male patients with spina bifida have normal sexual desires. During puberty they begin to realize that they can achieve erection and sexual intercourse but without any sensation in the penis. We hypothesized that restored sensation in the penis would greatly contribute to their quality of life and sexual health. In this prospective study we investigated the outcome of a new operative neurological bypass procedure in patients with spina bifida. MATERIALS AND methods: In 3 patients who were 17, 18 and 21 years old with a spinal lesion at L5, L4 and L3-L4, respectively, the sensory ilioinguinal nerve (L1) was cut distal in the groin and joined by microneurorrhaphy to the divided ipsilateral dorsal nerve of the penis (S2-4) at the base of the penis. All patients underwent preoperative and postoperative neurological and psychological evaluations. RESULTS: By 15 months postoperatively all patients had achieved excellent sensation on the operated side of the glans penis. They were unequivocally positive about the results and the penis had become more integrated into the body image. In 2 patients masturbation became more meaningful and 1 became more sexually active with and without his partner. CONCLUSIONS: The newly designed neurological bypass procedure in patients with spina bifida resulted in excellent sensibility in the glans penis. The new sensation appeared to contribute to the quality of the patient sexuality and sexual functioning as well as to the feeling of being a more normal and complete individual who is more conscious of the penis. This new operation might become standard treatment in patients with spina bifida in the future.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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