Cases reported "Spinal Dysraphism"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Giant presacral neuro-enteric cyst with anomalous sacrum in an adult patient.

    A rare case of an adult patient with a giant neuro-enteric cyst in a presacral location is reported. It had unique histological features of a stratified squamous epithelial lining with neuro-epithelial and smooth muscle components. There was associated sacral dysgenesis with spina bifida. The possible pathogenesis of this entity is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Investigation and treatment of a multiple limb birth.

    We report a baby born with three fully developed normally functioning legs. The third leg was attached to the baby's sacrum via an iliac bone at the site of a spina bifida. A primitive perineum was present. Innervation of the limb was via a sacral hiatus with a myelomeningocele. A rudimentary peritoneal sac was found at operation containing a blind loop of bowel suspended by a mesentery. The additional leg was found to have no cortical representation using somatic evoked potentials although lumbar responses were normal. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a bifid spinal cord in the lumbo-sacral region. Associated abnormalities were a haemangioma of the L orbit and a vascular mass in the cerebellum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. Pseudotail associated with spinal dysraphism.

    A 5-year-old girl had a caudal appendage and her left buttock was larger than the righ buttock. X-ray examination revealed spina bifida and bony defect of sacrum; computed tomography demonstrated the extension of the tumor from subcutaneous tissue to the spinal canal. Histologically, the pseudotail contained lobulated fatty tissue which was consistent with lipoma. It emphasizes the fact that even lesions that are not situated in the median line should be carefully explored before excision.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. Terminal myelocystocele--a case report.

    Terminal myelocystocele is a rare form of occult spinal dysraphism in which the hydromyelic caudal spinal cord and the subarachnoid space are hemiated through a posterior spina bifida. A 1.5 month old boy presented with a large lumbosacral mass and urinary incontinence. The magnetic resonance imaging, operative findings and pathological findings revealed a low lying conus with a dilated central canal dorsally attached to the subcutaneous tissue. Ventral subarachnoid space was enlarged and herniated through the laminar defect of the sacrum. The lesion was typical of a terminal myelocystocele. The clinical features are different from those of myelomeningocele in many aspects. Though the incidence is low, terminal myelocystocele should be included in the differential diagnosis of congenital lesions presenting as a lumbosacral mass.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. A novel embryogenetic mechanism for Currarino's triad: inadequate dorsoventral separation of the caudal eminence from hindgut endoderm.

    Currarino's triad is a congenital malformation involving the combination of anorectal stenosis, a presacral mass (most often a teratoma or ventral menigocele) and an anterior sacral bony defect (scimitar sacrum). Current theories regarding its embryogenesis are difficult to reconcile with our current understanding of caudal neuraxial and hindgut development. Caudal neuraxial structures develop from the caudal eminence (or tail bud), which normally separates from the hindgut endoderm concurrent with ingrowth of the posterior notochord during late gastrulation. We describe the first reported association of Currarino's triad with a caudal split cord malformation. It has previously been proposed that split cord malformations and related 'complex dysraphic malformations' involving abnormalities of one or more of the three primary germ layers arise through disordered midline axial integration during gastrulation. The presence of a split cord malformation in a patient with Currarino's triad suggests that the two disorders share a common embryogenetic pathway. We propose that the malformations of Currarino's triad arise through a failure of dorsoventral separation of the caudal eminence from the hindgut endoderm during late gastrulation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Spinal Dysraphism'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.