Cases reported "Spinal Fractures"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/63. Cervical fracture, decapitation, and vehicle-assisted suicide.

    Two cases of vehicle-assisted suicides are described in males aged 33 and 24 years, respectively. In both cases the victims had tied ropes between stationary objects and their necks and then attempted to drive their vehicles away. The speed with which the vehicles were driven resulted in forces great enough to cause fracture--dislocation of the cervical spine in Case 1 and virtual decapitation in Case 2. Although inadvertent alteration of the death scene in Case 1, with removal of the rope, complicated the initial assessment, the extent of soft tissue and bony injuries was such that ligature strangulation appeared unlikely.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/63. Combined odontoid and jefferson fracture in a child: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case of combined odontoid and Jefferson fracture is reported. OBJECTIVE: To alert spine physicians to the rare combination of an odontoid and Jefferson fracture in a child. methods: A 5-year old boy presented with neck pain and torticollis after falling on his head from a four-wheeler that had rolled over. A computed tomography scan confirmed a combined odontoid and Jefferson fracture. RESULTS: The child was successfully treated nonsurgically with a hard cervical orthosis. At this writing, the child clinically is asymptomatic 2 years after the injury. DISCUSSION: The fall on to the head caused the body weight to be transmitted to the atlas. The resulting force vector produced the classic Jefferson fracture of the atlas. As the atlas fracture spread with continued compressive and axial forces, tension was exerted on the alar ligaments (check ligaments), leading to the avulsion fracture of the odontoid. CONCLUSIONS: This is only the second reported case of a child with a combined Jefferson and odontoid fracture. This diagnosis should be considered in the evaluation of a child with neck pain and torticollis from a fall on the top of the head.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/63. Hangman's fracture caused by suspected child abuse. A case report.

    This report highlights the difficulties associated with diagnosing cervical spine injuries in children especially as the history and mechanism of injury may often be unclear and the normal variations in roentgenographic appearance may be confusing. As far as we are aware this is only the second case of traumatic Hangman's fracture in a child under the age of 3 years and the only case where there is a strong probability of child abuse. A female child aged 23 months was admitted with a 5-day history of irritability and general malaise. Her father reported noticing that she was reluctant to move her neck. He denied any possibility of trauma. On admission she had neck stiffness with a temperature of 37 degrees C and supported her neck with her hands. There was evidence of otitis media of her right ear. Her physical examination was otherwise normal. A full blood count and lumbar puncture were within normal limits. Cervical spine x rays suggested a Hangman's fracture of C2 with slight anterior subluxation of C2 on C3 and a kyphus at that level. Computerized tomography demonstrated no significant canal encroachment. An isotope bone scan was non-diagnostic. She was treated in a moulded cervical collar with neck held in slight extension. Her symptoms resolved and further radiographs showed improved alignment. Repeat CT scans seven weeks post admission showed callus formation. At follow-up at one year she remains asymptomatic. Hangman's fracture is very rare in children under 3 years and the considerable normal variations further complicate diagnosis. Swischuk described the posterior cervical line connecting the spinous process of C1-C3 vertebrae on the lateral projection to differentiate a true fracture dislocation from physiological anterior displacement. A detailed history, roentgenograms, bone scans, CT scans and MRI scans are often required for accurate diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/63. Cervical spine control; bending the rules.

    Cervical spine fractures associated with diffuse idiopathic hyperostosis (DISH) are less common than those associated with ankylosing spondylitis and can occur after minor trauma in patients asymptomatic of the disease process. This case report describes a hyperextension injury of the neck in a patient unknown to have DISH, which resulted in an angulated C3/C4 fracture. The position of the fracture was improved by placing the neck in flexion with immediate improvement in the patient's neurological deficit.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/63. Seizure-induced thoracic spine compression fracture: case report.

    BACKGROUND: Vertebral fracture caused solely by a convulsive seizure has rarely been reported in the neurosurgical literature. CASE DESCRIPTION: We describe a 34-year-old male with severe back pain from a thoracic fracture occurring in association with a seizure during hospitalization for treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy. Bone mineral densities in the lumbar spine and the femoral neck were decreased, possibly by long-term anti-epileptic medication. Muscle contractions during a seizure can result in vertebral fractures, especially at the thoracic levels. CONCLUSION: A complaint of back pain after a convulsive seizure should prompt radiologic investigation for vertebral fracture, even in the absence of external trauma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/63. Chance type cervical fracture and neurological deficits in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Prevention of sudden neck movements is vital in patients with ankylosing spondylitis of the cervical spine. We present a case of ankylosing spondylitis who sustained a cervical fracture. He presented with paraplegia after a minor car collision and died of pulmonary embolism after the operation for anterior stabilisation. We believe that the most important matter in a patient with advanced ankylosing spondylitis is the prevention of the fractures and complications. The need for neck protection in automobiles was emphasized and the literature reviewed about the occurrences of neurological deficits following trauma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/63. Anterior instrumentation for traumatic C1-C2 instability.

    STUDY DESIGN: Technical note, case report. and review of literature. OBJECTIVE: Description of anterior transarticular internal fixation for traumatic C1-C2 instability. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The currently effective posterior approaches for instrumentation of the C1-C2 junction require considerable soft tissue dissection and prone patient positioning. Some medical and anatomic conditions restrict the posterior approach. MATERIALS AND methods: An odontoid screw and anterior transarticular C1-C2 screws were used to instrument an unstable injury at this junction. The lesion consisted of a type II dens fracture and C1 ring disruption. Two high-quality fluoroscopy machines, a radiolucent OSI fracture table, and the Synframe (Synthes, Paoli, PA) retraction system are used for this procedure. The implant of choice is the 4.0-mm cannulated titanium screw. RESULTS: At 4-month follow-up, successful stabilization without failure of hardware is documented. The patient's neurologic status is stable, with a minor residual left upper extremity motor deficit. The patient has restricted C-spine rotation but no neck pain with movement. CONCLUSION: Anterior stabilization through a standard Smith-Robinson approach of the C1-C2 junction with screws into the odontoid and the lateral masses of C1 is effective. Supine positioning and minimal soft tissue dissection are advantages of this method over standard posterior transarticular instrumentation. knowledge of the local anatomy, strict adherence to the operative protocol, and high-quality fluoroscopy avoid potential surgical complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/63. Osteoplastic repair of the atlas.

    Fractures of the atlas constitute 4% to 12% of all bony injuries of the cervical spine; most are treated successfully by a cervical orthosis. Nonunion may be associated with neck or scalp pain on movement and is treated conventionally by some form of craniocervical fusion, which restricts head movement. The authors describe a case in which direct repair of the bony ring with a titanium plate and screws allowed bone healing, relieved the symptoms and maintained a full range of neck movements. The titanium plate interfered little with postoperative MR and CT imaging.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/63. Osteoporotic fracture of the dens revealed by cervical manipulation.

    Osteoporotic vertebral fractures selectively affect the thoracolumbar junction, usually sparing the cervical spine. A 65-year-old woman with documented osteoporotic fractures and chronic alcohol abuse presented with neck pain and occipital neuralgia that started after she suddenly flexed then extended her neck. Following several sessions of cervical manipulation, her pain became more severe, and she was admitted. Imaging studies showed multiple fractures in the dens, C6 and C7. These apparently spontaneous fractures suggested a bone tumor, for which investigations were negative. osteoporosis was the only identifiable cause. The spinal manipulations probably worsened the lesions which were performed by a chiropractor who is not a physician and did not obtain cervical spine radiographs before treating the patient. osteoporosis contraindicates spinal manipulation at any level, including the cervical spine.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/63. Immediate endovascular stent-graft repair of an acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta: case report and subject review.

    We describe a case of emergency endovascular stent-graft placement for acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta in a patient with an associated unstable type II odontoid fracture. The stent-graft placement procedure was performed within 4 hours of admission under sedation and local anaesthesia while the neck remained externally splinted. After exclusion of the rupture the patient could then undergo treatment of the associated cervical fracture and other injuries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Spinal Fractures'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.