Cases reported "Spinal Fractures"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/25. Neurological complications in insufficiency fractures of the sacrum. Three case-reports.

    Three cases of nerve root compromise in elderly women with insufficiency fractures of the sacrum are reported. Neurological compromise is generally felt to be exceedingly rare in this setting. A review of 493 cases of sacral insufficiency fractures reported in the literature suggested an incidence of about 2%. The true incidence is probably higher since many case-reports provided only scant information on symptoms; furthermore, sphincter dysfunction and lower limb paresthesia were the most common symptoms and can readily be overlooked or misinterpreted in elderly patients with multiple health problems. The neurological manifestations were delayed in some cases. A full recovery was the rule. The characteristics of the sacral fracture were not consistently related with the risk of neurological compromise. In most cases there was no displacement and in many the foramina were not involved. The pathophysiology of the neurological manifestations remains unclear. We suggest that patients with sacral insufficiency fractures should be carefully monitored for neurological manifestations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/25. Traumatic transverse fracture of sacrum with cauda equina injury--a case report and review of literature.

    Fractures of the sacrum are rare and generally associated with fracture of the pelvis. Transverse fractures of the sacrum are even less frequent and neurological deficit may accompany these fractures. A case of transverse fracture sacrum with cauda equina injury treated by sacral laminectomy and root decompression, is reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/25. Fracture sacrum.

    An extremely rare case of combined transverse and vertical fracture of sacrum with neurological deficit is reported here with a six month follow-up. The patient also had an L1 compression fracture. The patient has recovered significantly with conservative management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/25. Postpartal sacral fracture without osteoporosis.

    Stress fractures of the sacrum during pregnancy or the postpartum seem uncommon. We report a new case of nontrauma-related postpartal sacral fracture. Only four similar cases have been reported to date. The patient was 36 years of age and her fracture was diagnosed four weeks after her first delivery. vitamin d levels were low, but there was no osteomalacia. Other standard laboratory tests were normal, as were absorptiometry measurements at the lumbar spine and femur. Rheumatologists should consider sacral fracture in pregnant or nursing patients with buttock pain. magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic investigation of choice.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/25. Description of a rare type of posterior pelvis traumatic involvement: the green-stick fracture of the sarcum.

    Fractures of the pelvic ring in children behave differently than in adults. In children, bone elastic properties allow for plastic deformation instead of complete breaks. To the best of our knowledge no reports of this bony behavior have been described in the sacrum, and this could explain the presence of single displaced anterior breaks without evident posterior pelvic disruption. The objective of this paper is to document a rare type of posterior pelvis trauma: the green-stick fracture of the sacrum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/25. A case report of neurologically unstable fracture of the lumbosacral spine in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.

    INTRODUCTION: Fracture/dislocation is uncommonly reported in ankylosing spondylitis involving the lumbosacral spine. CLINICAL PICTURE: We report an 18-month follow-up of a case of neurologically unstable traumatic fracture of the lumbosacral spine in ankylosing spondylitis. TREATMENT/OUTCOME: Posterior decompression, alar-transverse fusion and instrumentation were performed. Anterior diskectomy and fusion were done 6 weeks later. There was solid bony fusion on follow-up and the patient had improvement of 2 Frankel grades and was able to ambulate. CONCLUSION: Combined approaches and longer fixations to stabilise the spine may be required. In the lumbosacral spine, this poses a problem vis-a-vis limited levels of fixation in the sacrum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/25. Spontaneous osteoporotic fractures of the sacrum causing neurological damage. Report of three cases.

    Although osteoporotic fractures of the sacrum seem to be a well-known entity, their associated rate of neurological complications has not been assessed in the literature. The authors report three such cases of nerve root compromise in elderly women and conduct a literature review. Based on their review, they estimate the incidence to be approximately 2%. The true incidence is probably higher because many case reports provide only scant information on symptoms; furthermore, sphincter dysfunction and lower-limb paresthesias are the most common symptoms and can readily be overlooked or misinterpreted in elderly patients with multiple health problems. The neurological manifestations were delayed in some cases. A full recovery is the rule. The characteristics of the sacral fracture are not consistently related with the risk of neurological compromise. In most reviewed cases the authors found no displacement and in many the foramina were not involved. The pathophysiology of the neurological manifestations remains unclear. The authors suggest that patients with sacral osteoporotic fractures should be carefully monitored for neurological manifestations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/25. Fracture-dislocation of the lumbosacral spine: case report and review of the literature.

    This report describes an extensively comminuted fracture of the sacrum and the L-5 vertebral body with complete anterior dislocation of the lumbar spine on the sacrum that occurred in a 19-year-old man ejected from a motor vehicle. Lumbosacral dissociation was characterized by computed tomography with three-dimensional and multiplanar reconstruction, and definitively managed by posterior instrumentation using locking hook spinal rods attached to the pelvis with hockey stick attachments by the Galveston technique. Implications of this case and a review of the literature are presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/25. Fractures of the sacrum and disk herniation: rare lesions in the pediatric surgical patient?

    Fractures of the sacrum and lesions of the intervertebral disks are seldom reported in childhood and adolescence. In our report, illustrated by three representative cases that we treated during the past six months, we show that sacrum fractures, not an easy diagnosis, may be more frequent than currently assumed, and that in quite a number of children and adolescents an anterior pelvic fracture may in fact be an unrecognized Malgaigne type pelvic fracture with a posterior fracture plane cutting through the sacrum. They may be accompanied by herniations and/or lacerations of intervertebral disks.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/25. Burst fracture of the fifth lumbar vertebra.

    Burst fracture of the fifth lumbar vertebra is a rare injury. We report the cases of seven patients who were treated conservatively by immobilization for six to eight weeks in a body-jacket cast that included one lower extremity to the knee. The patients were allowed to walk ten to fourteen days after the injury. A thoracolumbosacral orthosis was worn for an additional three months. No patient had an injury to the sacral root. Two patients had mild lower lumbar motor-root deficits that resolved within one year. All patients had an occasional backache, and two had intermittent radicular-type pain in the distribution of the fifth lumbar or first sacral-nerve root. The degree of compromise of the spinal canal could not be directly related to the degree of neurological deficit; that is, a large compromise of the spinal canal did not necessarily result in a major loss of neurological function. There was no early or late loss of lordosis between the cephalad end-plate of the fourth lumbar vertebra and the cephalad aspect of the sacrum, and there were no signs of progressive collapse of the vertebral body in any patient. In our series, the burst fractures of the fifth lumbar vertebra were stable injuries that caused minimum neurological deficits, and treatment by immobilization in a body-jacket cast was effective.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Spinal Fractures'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.