Cases reported "Spinal Neoplasms"

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1/90. A case of chordoma in association with rectal carcinoma.

    A 74-year-old male patient presented with anal and sacral pain 18 months after abdomino-perineal resection for rectal cancer. Computerized tomography (CT) of the pelvis demonstrated a well defined mass anterior to the lower sacrum, posteriorly infiltrating and destroying the fourth and fifth sacral nerves and invading the right gluteal fossa. A 7.5 x 15 x 2 cm encapsulated mass was demonstrated during the operation using a posterior approach and the lower sacral segments together with the tumour were removed by amputation at S3 level. Histopathology revealed chordoma. This case is unique because of the rarity of chordoma in association with rectal tumour at the sacrococcygeal region.
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keywords = sacrum
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2/90. Multiple spinal "miliary" hemangioblastomas in von Hippel-Lindau (vHL) disease without cerebellar involvement. A case report and review of the literature.

    We report on a 57-year-old male presenting with radicular pain in the nerve roots of L5 and S1 on the right side and dysuria. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine showed multiple (up to 20) small, intradural enhancing nodules attached to the cauda equina down to the sacrum, the largest 1 cm in diameter at the level Th12/L1 compressing the conus. Additionally, small nodules in the cervico-thoracal region adjacent to the cord, but no cerebellar or cerebral abnormalities, were detected in a consecutive MRI of the remaining neuroaxis. The histology of a resected lesion at Th12/L1 revealed hemangioblastoma of the reticular type. Together with a history of left eye enucleation performed 17 years ago for angiomatosis of the retina and the immunohistochemical detection of von Hippel-Lindau (vHL) protein within the removed spinal hemangioblastoma, a diagnosis of vHL disease was established. family history and screening for visceral manifestations of vHL disease were negative. In contrast to cerebellar or solitary spinal hemangioblastomas, multiple spinal hemangioblastomas without cerebellar involvement in vHL represent unusual manifestations. Unlike the case for solitary lesions in non-syndromic patients, a surgical cure does not seem feasible in this case. The role of treatment modalities is discussed.
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keywords = sacrum
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3/90. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the sacrum.

    A 30-year-old man with a 7-month history of mild sacral pain and intermittant left sciatica was found to have an expansile lesion in the sacrum on a plain radiograph. biopsy confirmed a chondromyxoid fibroma which was removed surgically. A 1-year follow-up showed no recurrence. The case is the fifth to be reported. Plain film and MRI appearances, histology and treatment are described. The previously reported cases are reviewed and the current literature is discussed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = sacrum
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4/90. Ewing's sarcoma of the sacrum.

    Radiological findings in a case of spinal Ewing' s sarcoma are reported. A lytic lesion with soft tissue component in the sacrum was identified. Ewing's sarcoma should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially when a child has a lytic lesion with soft tissue extension in the spine.
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ranking = 5
keywords = sacrum
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5/90. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the sacrum: a case report and review of the literature.

    The authors present a case of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma located in the sacrum of a 23-year-old patient treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A review of the literature on the topic is also reported.
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ranking = 5
keywords = sacrum
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6/90. Intraoperative computed tomography for complex craniocervical operations and spinal tumor resections.

    OBJECTIVE: To improve intraoperative observation of unexposed anatomic features and to verify surgical correction, a mobile computed tomographic (CT) scanner has been introduced into the operating room. To date, intraoperative CT scanning has been used predominantly for intracranial procedures. We report on the expanded use of intraoperative CT scanning for spinal surgery, because CT scanning provides excellent observation of osseous pathological features. We report on our first 17 cases, which involved complex craniocervical operations and spinal tumor resections. methods: The Tomoscan M CT scanner (Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, The netherlands) is mobile and consists of a translatable gantry, a translatable table, and an operator's workstation. In the operating room, the patient is placed on the CT table and prepared in the usual manner. The aperture of the gantry is covered with sterile plastic drapes. The gantry is docked to the table for intraoperative CT scanning as needed for navigation and verification during surgery. Each series of scans requires approximately 15 to 20 minutes. RESULTS: Our initial experience with neurosurgical spinal cases demonstrated that the use of intraoperative CT scanning changed the course of surgery in 6 of 17 cases. CT scanning was beneficial in facilitating adequate ventral clival and craniocervical decompressions, promoting more complete tumor resections, and verifying correct graft and instrument placement before surgical closing. Other settings in which we have found the mobile CT scanner useful include the neurointerventional suite and the intensive care unit; it is also useful for radiotherapy planning. CONCLUSION: On the basis of findings for our first 17 spinal surgery cases, we conclude that intraoperative CT scanning of the spine is both feasible and beneficial for select complex spinal procedures from the craniocervical junction to the sacrum.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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7/90. magnetic resonance imaging appearance of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma to the sacrum and epidural space.

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare malignant tumor of the skin and often is diagnosed histologically as lymphoma, melanoma and even metastatic small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL). Classified as a neuroendocrine tumor, clinically it originates in the head and neck region and may present with metastatic disease at the time of presentation [1]. Osseous involvement in the past has been described to involve regional facial bones only. We present the first reported MRI findings of distant osseous metastasis from a Merkel cell carcinoma to the lumbosacral spine with associated soft tissue and epidural involvement. Appropriate treatment and patient survival depend on prompt diagnostic imaging for establishment of metastatic disease. Previous reports have advocated CT for diagnosis and staging of distant metastases [2,3]. When spinal involvement is suspected, MRI may be a more suitable modality for assessment of the epidural space and appropriate staging and follow-up in such cases.
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ranking = 4
keywords = sacrum
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8/90. Giant intrasacral cellular schwannoma treated with high sacral amputation.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report of a man with a gigantic cellular schwannoma in the sacrum treated with high sacral amputation accompanied by careful nerve root-sparing dissection. OBJECTIVES: To describe the atypical clinical course of an intrasacral cellular schwannoma and the surgical procedure of high sacral amputation performed in a way to prevent needless sacrifice of functionally essential nerve roots. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Fundamentally, a cellular schwannoma is a benign tumor, but the clinical course is atypical. The symptoms are mild and the clinicopathologic features often mislead us to make a diagnosis of malignancy. The occurrence rate of intraosseous cellular schwannoma was reported to be 0.2% of all bony tumors, and the main location was the retroperitoneal space in the pelvis. Forty-one cases of giant intrasacral schwannomas have been reported so far. Among them, large sacral schwannoma with anterior cortex erosion and associated intrapelvic extension was extremely rare. methods: The patient presented with a 5-year history of right leg and buttock pain, which did not disturb his daily activities. After a histopathologic diagnosis and a complete set of image studies, high sacral amputation with preservation of uninvolved nerve roots was performed at S1-S2 through a combined anterior and posterior approach. Both S1 nerve roots and the right S2-S3 nerve roots were saved using a threaded saw. The lumbar spine was stabilized to the pelvic girdle using spinal instrumentation with posterolateral fusion. RESULTS: Eighteen months after the tumor was resected the patient had a very good clinical outcome, and there were no radiologic signs of instability or recurrence of the tumor. Locomotor function of both lower extremities and bowel and urinary functions were well maintained. The patient returned to his previous work. CONCLUSIONS: High sacral amputation following a combined anteroposterior approach provided good results without causing any disability. A detailed preoperative planning and careful dissection of uninvolved nerve roots prevented unnecessary neurologic impairment in locomotion and the detrusor and anorectal function.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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9/90. Giant-cell tumors of the spine and sacrum causing neurological symptoms.

    pain and neurological disturbances were the most frequent symptoms in patients with giant-cell tumors of the spine (4 cases) and sacrum (1 case). A good prognosis is possible in patients with vertebral tumor localization. There were no recurrences at follow-up 6 to 16 years after the first admission. The patient with a sacral tumor is alive more than 15 years after the first admission with some remaining neurological symptoms. Early surgical and/or radiation therapy is important. If institution of treatment is delayed more than three months after the onset of nerve root symptoms, there is a great risk of development of irreversible neurological lesions.
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ranking = 5
keywords = sacrum
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10/90. carcinoid tumor of the coccyx: case report and review of the literature.

    STUDY DESIGN: Report of a patient with a carcinoid tumor of the coccyx. OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of a patient with a carcinoid tumor of the coccyx and to review the relevant medical literature in English. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: No reports of a carcinoid tumor of the coccyx were found in the literature. Seven reports of carcinoid of the sacrum are described. methods: Clinical history, magnetic resonance imaging studies, and light and electronic microscope micrographs are reviewed. RESULTS: A coccygeal mass was detected during evaluation of coccygodynia in a 40-year-old woman. Four years after extended coccygectomy, there are no signs of local tumor recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: carcinoid tumor of the coccyx is extremely rare. An extended coccygectomy may lead to a cure or at least to a prolonged disease-free interval.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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