Cases reported "Spinal Neoplasms"

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1/868. Complete paraplegia due to multiple intracerebral and spinal cavernomas.

    We report on a 29-year-old male patient with multiple intracerebral and spinal cavernomas. Bleeding in the thoracic cord at admission and additional bleeding which occurred 12 days later in the cervical cord resulted in complete paraplegia below thoracic level 4 (Th4). Four years earlier multiple cerebral cavernomas had been diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Based upon reported cases in the literature multiple intracerebral and spinal cavernomas are exceptional. Additionally, the clinical presentation in our case is uncommon.
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2/868. Conus medullaris hematomyelia associated with an intradural-extramedullary cavernous angioma.

    A unique case of a 50-year-old woman with a conus medullaris hematomyelia associated with a low thoracic intradural-extramedullary cavernous angioma localized 2 cm above is reported. The patient had a 2-month history of progressive paraparesis, hypoesthesia of legs, and bowel and bladder disturbances. The symptoms worsened acutely during the last days before admission. A thoraco-lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion at T10-T11 (vertebral interspace associated with a hematomyelia localized about 2 cm below. A T10-L1 laminectomy was performed and complete removal of both lesions was obtained with microsurgical technique. A non-traumatic hematomyelia should always prompt the suspicion of a spinal AVM or, more rarely, of a cavernous angioma. The possible anatomical and clinical correlations of this unusual association are discussed.
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3/868. Chronic renal failure causing brown tumors and myelopathy. Case report and review of pathophysiology and treatment.

    Brown tumors (osteoclastomas) are histologically benign lesions that are caused by primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a frequent complication of chronic renal failure. Skeletal brown tumors are relatively uncommon, and brown tumors that involve the spine are considered very rare. The authors present the case of a 37-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus and hemodialysis-dependent anuric renal failure, in whom spinal cord compression developed due to a brown tumor and pathological fracture at T-9. The patient underwent transthoracic decompressive surgery and spinal reconstruction in which cadaveric femoral allograft and instrumentation were used. Brown tumors of the vertebral column require surgical treatment if medical therapy and parathyroidectomy fail to halt their progression or if acute neurological deterioration occurs. In patients with renal failure bone healing is delayed and there is an increased risk that healing will fail because the metabolic derangements can result in severe osteoporosis. Surgical reconstruction of the spine may require the use of augmentation with instrumentation and aggressive treatment of hyperparathyroidism to achieve successful outcomes.
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4/868. Occipital pain in osteoid osteoma of the atlas. A report of two cases.

    STUDY DESIGN: Two cases of occipital pain caused by an osteoid osteoma of the atlas are presented. OBJECTIVES: To describe the management of occipital pain in two young patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Osteoid osteoma is a benign lesion mostly affecting the long bones. A spinal location is uncommon. To the authors' knowledge, there are only five other reports of an osteoid osteoma located in the atlas. methods: Occipital headache, which was relieved by salicylates, was the major symptom reported by the two adolescents. In the first patient, a lesion of C1 was seen on plain radiographs. In the second patient, the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was suggested by scintigraphic imaging and subsequently by computed tomography. RESULTS: pain disappeared in both cases after surgical excision of the lesion. Histologic examination disclosed characteristic features of osteoid osteoma. CONCLUSIONS: Occipital pain in adolescents, which is relieved by aspirin, should raise suspicion about the possibility of an osteoid osteoma of the atlas. If standard cervical spine radiographs are negative, isotope scanning and computed tomography can help to establish the diagnosis. Complete excision eliminates the lesion and produces immediate relief for the patient.
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5/868. Spinal manifestation of metastasizing leiomyosarcoma.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report. OBJECTIVE: To provide additional information on possible relations between uterine and spinal manifestations of leiomyosarcoma. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Spinal metastases and primary spinal manifestation of leiomyosarcoma and other malignant smooth muscle tumors are rarely observed. methods: Clinical and radiologic follow-up of a patient with a spinal tumor. RESULTS: A 46-year-old women had rapidly progressive paraplegia caused by an extramedullary lesion in the extradural space at T2-T3, with spinal cord compression. After surgical decompression, the resected tumor was histologically classified as a leiomyosarcoma. Diagnostic work-up failed to detect the primary tumor site. Previous medical history had been uneventful except for hysterectomy 3 years earlier for a leiomyoma. Extended necroses and focal metaplasia were already described in the hysterectomy specimen indicating malignant disease; however, it was not definitely diagnosed. Multiple leiomyosarcoma metastases developed 22 months later. CONCLUSIONS: In retrospect, the origin of the leiomyosarcoma that manifested in the thoracic spine of the patient must be reconsidered. Rather than a primary dural leiomyosarcoma, this tumor represented the first evidence of recurrence of a missed diagnosis of early-stage uterine leiomyosarcoma.
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6/868. Metastatic spine disease in renal cell carcinoma--indication and results of surgery.

    Metastatic spine disease is frequent in renal cell carcinoma and 50% of osseous metastases are already found at the time of primary diagnosis. Therefore patient mobility and quality of life are threatened early in the course of disease. Surgery is able to relieve pain and to regain or to preserve mobility. Indication and technique of surgery (anterior decompression, vertebral replacement and transpedicular fixation) are explained and treatment results of eleven cases are reported. All patients with paraparesis or cord compression preoperatively were mobile when leaving our hospital after surgery. There were no severe complications, especially no neurological deteriorations or deaths. Postoperative survival time was ten months approximately in cases with multiple osseous lesions and it was several years in cases with solitary metastases. Mobility was preserved for most of the survival time. In conclusion, restabilisation of the spine proved to be a worthwhile treatment option in well-selected cases suffering from malignant spinal involvement.
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7/868. Posterior mediastinal capillary hemangioma with extradural extension resembling neuroblastoma.

    We present two patients with posterior mediastinal capillary hemangiomas that were paraspinal and had intraspinal extension. Computed tomography demonstrated the strikingly hypervascular nature of these tumors, distinguishing them from neuroblastoma.
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8/868. Spinal malignant melanotic schwannoma. Case report.

    The authors report a rare case of spinal cord compression syndrome due to a malignant melanotic schwannoma. Pathogenesis, diagnostic difficulty and therapeutical problems are discussed. The authors conclude that such tumours should be surgically treated due to the possibility of a benign clinical behaviour even in those cases showing malignant histological features.
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9/868. Acute spinal cord compression due to intraspinal bleeding from a vertebral hemangioma: two case-reports.

    Vertebral hemangiomas can cause acute spinal cord compression either after a minor trauma or during the last 3 months of pregnancy. Failure to recognize the lesion can lead to potentially serious treatment delays. An emergency MRI scan usually establishes the diagnosis of vertebral hemangioma responsible for spinal cord compression requiring laminectomy. We report two cases showing that posterior fixation should be considered: in our experience it prevents vertebral collapse during the interval preceding secondary vertebroplasty, which, if performed, provides highly significant pain relief.
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10/868. Occipitocervicothoracic fixation for spinal instability in patients with neoplastic processes.

    OBJECT: Occipitocervicothoracic (OCT) fixation and fusion is an infrequently performed procedure to treat patients with severe spinal instability. Only three cases have been reported in the literature. The authors have retrospectively reviewed their experience with performing OCT fixation in patients with neoplastic processes, paying particular attention to method, pain relief, and neurological status. methods: From July 1994 through July 1998, 13 of 552 patients who underwent a total of 722 spinal operations at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have required OCT fixation for spinal instability caused by neoplastic processes (12 of 13 patients) or rheumatoid arthritis (one of 13 patients). Fixation was achieved by attaching two intraoperatively contoured titanium rods to the occiput via burr holes and Luque wires or cables; to the cervical spinous processes with wisconsin wires; and to the thoracic spine with a combination of transverse process and pedicle hooks. Crosslinks were used to attain additional stability. In all patients but one arthrodesis was performed using allograft. At a follow-up duration of 1 to 45 months (mean 14 months), six of the 12 patients with neoplasms remained alive, whereas the other six patients had died of malignant primary disease. There were no deaths related to the surgical procedure. Postoperatively, one patient experienced respiratory insufficiency, and two patients required revision of rotational or free myocutaneous flaps. All patients who presented with spine-based pain experienced a reduction in pain, as measured by a visual analog scale for pain. All patients who were neurologically intact preoperatively remained so; seven of seven patients with neurological impairment improved; and six of seven patients improved one Frankel grade. There were no occurrences of instrumentation failure or hardware-related complications. In one patient a revision of the instrumentation was required 13.5 months following the initial surgery for progression of malignant fibrous histiosarcoma. CONCLUSIONS: In selected patients, OCT fixation is an effective means of attaining stabilization that can provide pain relief and neurological preservation or improvement.
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