Cases reported "Spinal Osteophytosis"

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1/45. Cervical osteoarthropathy: an unusual cause of dysphagia.

    PRESENTATION: A 72-year-old man complained of progressive dysphagia for solids associated with a sensation of foreign body in his throat for 2 years. A barium swallow showed a bridging osteophyte between C4 and C5 vertebrae indenting the oesophagus posteriorly and displacing it anteriorly. OUTCOME: He refused surgical intervention and was given dietary advice. After 6 months, his weight was steady and he was able to swallow semi-solid food without difficulty.
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keywords = dysphagia
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2/45. Circumferential cervical surgery for spondylostenosis with kyphosis in two patients with athetoid cerebral palsy.

    BACKGROUND: patients with athetoid cerebral palsy may develop severe degenerative changes in the cervical spine decades earlier than their normal counterparts due to abnormal cervical motion. methods: Two patients, 48 and 52 years of age, presented with moderate to severe myelopathy (Nurick Grades IV and V). MR and 3-dimensional CT studies demonstrated severe spondylostenosis with kyphosis in both patients. This necessitated multilevel anterior corpectomy with fusion (C2-C7, C3-C7) using fibula and iliac crest autograft and Orion plating, followed by posterior wiring, fusion using Songer cables, and halo placement. RESULTS: Postoperatively, both patients improved, demonstrating only mild or mild to moderate (Nurick Grades II and III) residual myelopathy. Although both fused posteriorly within 3.5 months, the patient with the fibula graft developed a fracture of the anterior C7 body with mild anterior graft migration, and inferior plate extrusion into the C7-T1 interspace. However, because he has remained asymptomatic for 9 months postoperatively, without dysphagia, removal of the plate has not yet been necessary. CONCLUSIONS: patients with athetoid cerebral palsy should undergo early prospective cervical evaluations looking for impending cord compromise. When surgery is indicated, circumferential surgery offers the maximal degree of cord decompression and stabilization with the highest rate of fusion.
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keywords = dysphagia
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3/45. Dysphagia due to cervical osteophytes.

    A case of a 64-year-old man is presented with painless dysphagia and loud noise on swallowing due to large anterior cervical osteophytes demonstrated on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging accompanied by a brief review of the literature.
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keywords = dysphagia
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4/45. osteophyte-induced dysphagia: report of three cases.

    Dysphagia is a common complaint of patients seen by physicians. osteophyte compression due to diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or Forestier's disease and cervical spondylosis has been identified as a cause of dysphagia. We report three elderly male cases of whom two had dysphagia due to DISH and one had dysphagia due to osteophyte compression associated with severe cervical spondylosis. Clinical and radiographical findings including barium oesophagogram and computed tomography are presented. endoscopy should be carefully performed to rule out additional pathology in such patients. Medical treatment preferably with liquid forms of NSAIDs and diet may cause satisfactory improvement.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = dysphagia
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5/45. Dysphagia caused by anterior cervical osteophytes: a case report.

    This 79-year-old man had a several-year history of dysphagia. On presentation, he spoke with difficulty but was not short of breath, and hemoptysis was present. A 17-mm osteophyte anterior to C3-C4 encroached on the posterior aspect of the oral pharynx and esophagus. The patient underwent C3-C6 anterior ostectomy; recovery was complete within 4 weeks.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = dysphagia
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6/45. polymyositis masquerading as motor neuron disease.

    BACKGROUND: Several conditions have been reported to mimic motor neuron disease (MND), and misdiagnosis remains a common clinical problem. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of bulbar-onset polymyositis where the initial clinical presentation was suggestive of MND. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 73-year-old woman was admitted for investigation of acute-onset dysphagia without dysarthria. Examination revealed nasal dysphonia and severe oropharyngeal weakness. Subtle upper-limb weakness, brisk tendon reflexes, and fasciculations in the right deltoid muscle were also demonstrated. A clinical diagnosis of MND was entertained. The serum creatine kinase value was within the reference range. Findings from electromyographic studies, however, were suggestive of a myopathic rather than a neurodegenerative process, and a muscle biopsy specimen was diagnostic of polymyositis. The dysphagia rapidly resolved upon treatment with corticosteroids and azathioprine. CONCLUSIONS: Bulbar-onset polymyositis may mimic MND, particularly in the absence of inflammatory markers or elevated muscle enzyme levels. Caution should be exercised in the clinical diagnosis of bulbar dysfunction, and further investigations such as electromyography and muscle biopsy are indicated to confirm the diagnosis.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = dysphagia
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7/45. Osteoptysis: a complication of cervical spine surgery.

    The case is described of a lady who developed dysphagia and dysphonia misdiagnosed first as hysteria, then as myasthenia gravis, one year after a Cloward's operation for cervical disc disease. After a bout of coughing the bony dowel was expelled and the correct diagnosis was made.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = dysphagia
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8/45. Preliminary experience with a new surgical treatment for dysphagia due to anterior cervical osteophytes.

    A technique for surgical treatment of anterior cervical osteophytes is presented. A midline trough is created in the osteophytes using a burr under fluoroscopy down to the anterior cervical line. A rongeur is used to remove the remaining osteophytes while protecting the lateral soft tissues. Two patients presented with symptoms of progressive dysphagia secondary to anterior cervical osteophytes. Each underwent surgical ostectomy without complication after failing conservative treatment. This technique provides a safe, effective method to remove anterior cervical osteophytes.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dysphagia
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9/45. Posttraumatic anterior cervical osteophyte and dysphagia: surgical report and literature review.

    Degenerative changes in the cervical spine can produce osteophytes and other hypertrophic abnormalities. Asymptomatic osteophytes of the anterior margins of the cervical vertebrae may occur in 20-30% of the population. Occasionally, dysphagia or dysphonia may be caused by such cervical osteophytes pressing against the esophagus or trachea. Recently, the authors treated a patient with posttraumatic dysphagia and dysphonia secondary to osteophytic spurring of the anterior cervical spine. This 43-year-old man presented 2 years after sustaining a flexion/extension soft tissue injury to his cervical spine. Radiographic studies depict the progression of his osteophyte growth, which resulted in surgical intervention to relieve his inability to swallow solid foods. One year follow-up studies demonstrate normal alignment and no instability. A search of the literature revealed approximately 75 previously reported cases of anterior osteophyte-induced dysphagia, with the majority secondary to diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. The literature briefly mentions trauma as a possible etiology of anterior osteophytosis; however, our case is unique, as it documents the time course and progression of the pathologic process.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = dysphagia
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10/45. Anterior cervical osteophyte causing dysphagia as a complication of laminectomy.

    Asymptomatic osteophytes of the anterior margins of the cervical vertebral bodies (VB) may occur in 20 - 30% of the population. On rare occasions, dysphagia or dyspnoea may be caused by such cervical osteophytes. We present the case of a 27-year-old woman with progressive dysphagia caused by a voluminous osteophyte secondary to chronic cervical instability after a laminectomy performed 8 years before. Progressive growth of the osteophyte was observed in sequential roentgenograms. As far as we know, this complication of cervical laminectomy has never been reported before. After resection of the osteophyte and arthrodesis of the affected segment the patient was cured.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = dysphagia
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