Cases reported "Spinal Osteophytosis"

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1/48. A case report of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis syndrome presenting with spondylodiscitis.

    SAPHO syndrome stands for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis. The common site of skeletal lesions in this syndrome is the sternocostoclavicular area. Spondylodiscitis is rarely described in published studies. In general, skin lesions develop before the onset of skeletal lesions. We report a case of SAPHO syndrome in which spondylodiscitis developed more than 1 year before the onset of pustulosis.
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2/48. osteophyte-induced dysphagia: report of three cases.

    Dysphagia is a common complaint of patients seen by physicians. osteophyte compression due to diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or Forestier's disease and cervical spondylosis has been identified as a cause of dysphagia. We report three elderly male cases of whom two had dysphagia due to DISH and one had dysphagia due to osteophyte compression associated with severe cervical spondylosis. Clinical and radiographical findings including barium oesophagogram and computed tomography are presented. endoscopy should be carefully performed to rule out additional pathology in such patients. Medical treatment preferably with liquid forms of NSAIDs and diet may cause satisfactory improvement.
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3/48. Posttraumatic anterior cervical osteophyte and dysphagia: surgical report and literature review.

    Degenerative changes in the cervical spine can produce osteophytes and other hypertrophic abnormalities. Asymptomatic osteophytes of the anterior margins of the cervical vertebrae may occur in 20-30% of the population. Occasionally, dysphagia or dysphonia may be caused by such cervical osteophytes pressing against the esophagus or trachea. Recently, the authors treated a patient with posttraumatic dysphagia and dysphonia secondary to osteophytic spurring of the anterior cervical spine. This 43-year-old man presented 2 years after sustaining a flexion/extension soft tissue injury to his cervical spine. Radiographic studies depict the progression of his osteophyte growth, which resulted in surgical intervention to relieve his inability to swallow solid foods. One year follow-up studies demonstrate normal alignment and no instability. A search of the literature revealed approximately 75 previously reported cases of anterior osteophyte-induced dysphagia, with the majority secondary to diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. The literature briefly mentions trauma as a possible etiology of anterior osteophytosis; however, our case is unique, as it documents the time course and progression of the pathologic process.
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4/48. Anterior cervical osteophytes causing dysphagia.

    A review of the literature and four additional cases of surgical excision of anterior cervical osteophytes causing dysphagia is presented. Surgical excision of the osteophytes is recommended only after a complete evaluation to rule out other causes of dysphagia and after an adequate period of conservative therapy. The patients must be advised that frequently symptoms will recur to some extent as time progresses. In patients who have findings consistent with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH syndrome) recurrence of the osteophyte appears to be more common.
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5/48. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis causing acute thoracic myelopathy: a case report and discussion.

    A case of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis presenting as acute thoracic myelopathy is reported. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis has long been regarded as a radiological entity with an innocuous clinical course. The manifestations of this disease are reviewed. There is mounting evidence that it is neither a clinically infrequent nor, as this case report illustrates, an exclusively benign condition.
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6/48. Ankylosing hyperostosis of the spine: case report.

    Ankylosing hyperostosis of the spine is described as osteophytic spurs or anterior osseous bridges with thickening of the corresponding vertebral cortex. The ossification includes the ligamentum longitudinale anterius and the peripheral part of the disc. Our patient had minor complaints but at the time of consultation was symptomatic.
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7/48. Cervical osteophytes: their significance in ENT practice (ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis--Forestier's disease).

    The condition known as ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis or Forestier's disease is described. Eight cases are reviewed where the radiological findings warranted this diagnosis. Their presenting symptoms are summarized as are their responses to treatment. The relevance of this diagnosis is discussed with emphasis being placed on the importance of thorough investigation of these patients. In those for whom no other cause has been found for their symptoms, the various therapeutic options are outlined with the possible complications.
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8/48. Cervical myelopathy in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Case report.

    The case of a rapidly progressive cervical myelopathy in a 64-year-old man is presented. Radiological studies revealed a partial extradural block, which at surgery was found to be a focal fibrous, calcified mass associated with the ligamentum flavum. On the basis of the underlying disorder of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), the etiology of this compression was concluded to be focal fibrous proliferation and dystrophic calcification. The neurological complications of DISH are reviewed. The authors are not aware of any other reports of this cause of myelopathy associated with DISH.
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9/48. Thoracic spinal cord compression caused by diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is now recognized with increasing frequency in the elderly population. Whilst usually a relatively asymptomatic process, serious neurological sequelae have been reported. A previously unreported complication, severe focal thoracic canal stenosis, is presented. attention is drawn to the need for full assessment of the whole spine by CT myelography in patients presenting with evidence of myelopathy.
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10/48. Aspiration pneumonia due to diffuse cervical hyperostosis.

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis previously has been reported to cause a number of extraspinal manifestations including dysphagia, respiratory distress, dysphonia and cervical myelopathy. We report a case of cervical DISH so extensive as to interfere with the swallowing mechanism and lead to aspiration. patients with DISH who have mechanical compression of the posterior pharynx may be at high risk for aspiration.
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