Cases reported "Spinal Stenosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/93. Lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts of different etiologies: diagnosis by CT and MR imaging.

    Intraspinal synovial cysts arises from a facet joint and may cause radicular symptoms due to nerve root compression. In the present study, three surgically and histologically proved cases of synovial cyst of the lumbar spine with different etiology are described. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the imaging features of various etiologies of intraspinal synovial cysts allowing a correct preoperative diagnosis. review of the literature enables us to say that to our knowledge, there is no reported article collecting the imaging findings of intraspinal synovial cysts with different etiologies. Only single cases with rheumatoid arthritic or traumatic origin have been reported to date. We believe that computed tomography and particularly magnetic resonance imaging are the methods of choice which provide the most valuable diagnostic information.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/93. Laser-assisted diskectomy performed by an internist resulting in cauda equina syndrome.

    An internist performed percutaneous laser-assisted diskectomies (PLADs) on a patient with a sequestrated disc and stenosis. Subspecialists who perform PLADs should be trained in patient selection and lumbar diskectomy techniques. chymopapain, percutaneous nucleotome-assisted diskectomy, and PLADs are alternatives to microdiskectomy for the management of lumbar disc herniations. PLADs were performed at the L4-5/L5-S1 levels in a 38-year-old woman with magnetic resonance (MR)-documented L4-5 stenosis and disc disease. After PLADs, she developed a subacute cauda equina syndrome. Two months later, a neurosurgeon performed an L4-5 coronal hemilaminectomy with diskectomy. Within 6 postoperative weeks, she was neurologically intact. Only specialists trained in the selection, neurodiagnostic, and surgical management of lumbar disc disease should perform PLADs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/93. clostridium perfringens: a rare cause of postoperative spinal surgery meningitis.

    BACKGROUND: clostridium perfringens is a rare cause of central nervous system infections, particularly meningitis. The case of a 76-year-old man who developed fatal C. perfringens meningitis after routine decompressive laminectomy for spinal stenosis is described. CASE REPORT: Twelve days after surgery the patient presented with pain and serosangiunous drainage from the surgical incision site. A swab of the drainage revealed Gram-positive bacilli; MRI of the lumbosacral spine showed the appearance of air around the laminectomy site. The patient died within 6 hours of presentation. autopsy revealed acute cranial and spinal meningitis and choroid plexitis with organisms consistent with C. perfringens. CONCLUSION: No significant enteral pathology or source of endogenous infection was determined, suggesting postoperative wound contamination and meningeal seeding with this ubiquitous organism. Clostridial infection, although rare, should be considered in any patient with meningitis with a history of surgical intervention. survival with minimal neurological deficits was achieved in half of the previously reported cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/93. Transient lumbosacral polyradiculopathy after prostatectomy: association with spinal stenosis.

    mononeuropathies are common after pelvic surgery. They are usually the result of unnatural positioning during surgery or faulty restraining devices. Polyneuropathy in the postoperative setting is rare. We report two cases of polyradiculopathy after radical prostatectomy using two different patient positions. Both patients complained of paresthesias and weakness in their lower extremities on postoperative day 1. neurologic examination in each case was consistent with a polyradiculopathy. Significant spinal stenosis of the lumbosacral spine was found in both patients by magnetic resonance imaging. We propose that spinal stenosis is a risk factor for this type of neurologic injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/93. Circumferential cervical surgery for spondylostenosis with kyphosis in two patients with athetoid cerebral palsy.

    BACKGROUND: patients with athetoid cerebral palsy may develop severe degenerative changes in the cervical spine decades earlier than their normal counterparts due to abnormal cervical motion. methods: Two patients, 48 and 52 years of age, presented with moderate to severe myelopathy (Nurick Grades IV and V). MR and 3-dimensional CT studies demonstrated severe spondylostenosis with kyphosis in both patients. This necessitated multilevel anterior corpectomy with fusion (C2-C7, C3-C7) using fibula and iliac crest autograft and Orion plating, followed by posterior wiring, fusion using Songer cables, and halo placement. RESULTS: Postoperatively, both patients improved, demonstrating only mild or mild to moderate (Nurick Grades II and III) residual myelopathy. Although both fused posteriorly within 3.5 months, the patient with the fibula graft developed a fracture of the anterior C7 body with mild anterior graft migration, and inferior plate extrusion into the C7-T1 interspace. However, because he has remained asymptomatic for 9 months postoperatively, without dysphagia, removal of the plate has not yet been necessary. CONCLUSIONS: patients with athetoid cerebral palsy should undergo early prospective cervical evaluations looking for impending cord compromise. When surgery is indicated, circumferential surgery offers the maximal degree of cord decompression and stabilization with the highest rate of fusion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/93. Destructive spondyloarthropathy mimicking spondylitis in long-term hemodialysis patients.

    A 63-year-old man with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who had been undergoing hemodialysis for 18 years suffered persistent neck pain, progressive quadriparesis, and a deteriorating ataxic gait during the 6 months before admission. A sudden onset of aggravating quadriparesis and an inability to ambulate occurred during his trip to Sydney, australia, 1 week before this admission. Vertebral tuberculosis osteomyelitis of the C5/6 segment was considered and treated in a hospital there. Findings from cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; low signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images) were diagnostic of destructive spondyloarthropathy (DSA) and distinguishable from spinal osteomyelitis preoperatively. amyloid masses, mainly composed of B-2 microglobulin, filled in disc and paradiscal ligaments, with adjacent end-plate destruction by cytokine-mediated reactive inflammation, and appeared to be mostly related to the pathogenesis of DSA. The cervical spine, especially C5/6, is the most common site of DSA. Spinal instability and neurologic compression cause the clinical symptoms and signs. Adequate decompression and successful cervical fusion ensure the best therapeutic results.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/93. Acute cauda equina syndrome caused by a gas-containing prolapsed intervertebral disk.

    Gas production as a part of disk degeneration can occur, but it rarely causes clinical nerve compression syndromes. A rare case of gaseous degeneration in a prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disk causing acute cauda equina syndrome is described. Radiologic features and intraoperative findings are reported. A 78-year-old woman with severe lumbar canal stenosis had acute cauda equina syndrome. magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large disk protrusion, and she underwent an urgent operation for this. Surgery confirmed the severe lumbar canal stenosis, but the disk prolapse contained gas that had caused the nerve compression.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/93. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss after spinal surgery under general anesthesia.

    Two patients, ages 72 and 71, who underwent lumbar decompressive surgery for spinal stenosis, were evaluated for postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). After two uncomplicated spinal procedures, both patients developed SSHL immediately after surgery. hearing loss was moderate to profound in these two patients. None of the patients had a significant otologic history. nitrous oxide administration, Valsalva maneuvers during general anesthesia, and transient drops in cerebrospinal fluid pressure stemming from spinal decompression may, in some combination, lead to an implosive force on the inner ear, causing SSHL. Further causes of postlumbar surgery SSHL may include microemboli or viral infections. SSHL is a rare but possible complication after nonotologic, noncardiac bypass surgery; only 26 cases of SSHL after this surgery have been reported. We encourage the continued reporting of sudden sensorineural hearing loss after spinal surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/93. Extended posture of lumbar spine precipitating cauda equina compression arising from a postoperative epidural clot.

    We report a patient with nonoperatively treated acute cauda equina compression arising from an epidural clot that developed after decompressive surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. A 43-year-old woman underwent lumbar laminotomy, and was symptom-free for 3 hours; but this was followed by paresis. Postoperative myelography showed obstruction of the contrast column at the level of the laminotomy; this was relieved by hyperflexion of the lumbar spine. With sustained hyperflexion of the lumbar spine, all neurologic deficits were completely resolved within 5 days. Lumbar lordosis may be present when a patient lies in the supine position on a flat bed with the hips and knees extended; this may exacerbate dural constriction caused by an epidural clot following posterior lumbar spinal surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/93. Transient paraparesis: a complication of the surgical management of Scheuermann's kyphosis secondary to thoracic stenosis.

    STUDY DESIGN: Transient paraparesis during the operative management of a 16-year-old patient with Scheuermann's kyphosis secondary to thoracic stenosis is reported. OBJECTIVE: To describe a treatable cause for paraparesis in a patient with Scheuermann's kyphosis undergoing surgical treatment. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Cord injury in the surgical treatment of Scheuermann's kyphosis is a rare event, yet it is felt to be more common in the surgical correction of kyphosis than in surgery for scoliosis. Suggested etiologies have included vascular insufficiency, hypotension, direct mechanical trauma, and neural element stretch. Concomitant thoracic spinal stenosis predisposing to neurologic injury during surgical manipulation has not been reported. methods: A 16-year-old boy with progressive Scheuermann's kyphosis measuring 80 degrees from T7 to T12 underwent an anteroposterior spinal fusion with somatosensory-evoked potential monitoring and wake-up tests. During the instrumentation posteriorly, somatosensory-evoked potential monitoring became markedly abnormal. This was followed by a wake-up test that demonstrated the patient's inability to move either of his lower extremities. All instrumentation was removed. The patient had recovered neurologic function by the time he reached the recovery room. A computed tomography myelogram was performed on the third postoperative day, which demonstrated severe thoracic stenosis from T8 to T10. The patient was returned to the operating room 1 week later to undergo a posterior laminectomy from T7 to T11 and instrumented fusion from T5 to L2. Somatosensory-evoked potential monitoring was stable throughout this procedure, and the wake-up test was normal. RESULTS: The patient's postoperative course and subsequent 2-year follow-up period were unremarkable. He progressed to clinical and radiographic union and maintained a normal lower extremity neurologic examination. CONCLUSIONS: A treatable cause for paraparesis secondary to the surgical treatment of Scheuermann's kyphosis is presented. The author currently obtains a thoracic magnetic resonance image (MRI) before the surgical correction of any patients with Scheuermann's kyphosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Spinal Stenosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.