Cases reported "Spinal Stenosis"

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1/7. Nerve root herniation secondary to lumbar puncture in the patient with lumbar canal stenosis. A case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A very rare case of nerve root herniation secondary to lumbar puncture is reported. OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristic clinical features of this case and to discuss a mechanism of the nerve root herniation. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: There has been no previous report of nerve root herniation secondary to lumbar puncture. methods: A 66-year-old woman who experienced intermittent claudication as a result of sciatic pain on her right side was evaluated by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging, the results of which demonstrated central-type canal stenosis at L4-L5. The right sciatic pain was exacerbated after lumbar puncture. myelography and subsequent computed tomography showed marked stenosis of the thecal sac that was eccentric to the left, unlike the previous magnetic resonance imaging finding. RESULTS: At surgery, a herniated nerve root was found through a small rent of the dorsocentral portion of the thecal sac at L4-L5, presenting a loop with epineural bleeding. The herniated nerve root was put back into the intrathecal space, and the dural tear was repaired. CONCLUSION: Lumbar puncture can be a cause of nerve root herniation in cases of lumbar canal stenosis. The puncture should not be carried out at an area of stenosis.
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2/7. The role of acute decompression and restoration of spinal alignment in the prevention of post-traumatic syringomyelia: case report and review of recent literature.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report. INTRODUCTION: Acute post-traumatic syringomyelia formation after spinal cord injury has been considered a rare complication. At this writing, most recent reports have surfaced in neurosurgical journals. As an entity, post-traumatic syringomyelia has not been widely appreciated. It has been confused with conditions such as Hansen's disease or ulnar nerve compression at the cubital tunnel. One study also demonstrated that the occurrence of syrinx is significantly correlated with spinal stenosis after treatment, and that an inadequate reduction of the spine may lead to the formation of syrinx. This reported case describes a patient in whom post-traumatic syringomyelia began to develop 3 weeks after injury, which improved neurologically after adequate decompression. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A 30-year-old man sustained a 20-foot fall at work. He presented with a complete spinal cord injury below T4 secondary to a T4 fracture dislocation. The patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of T1-T8. After 3 weeks, the patient was noted to have ascending weakness in his bilateral upper extremities and some clawing of both hands. methods: A computed tomography myelogram demonstrated inability of contrast to pass through the T4-T5 region from a lumbar puncture. An incomplete reduction was noted. The canal showed significant stenosis. A magnetic resonance image of the patient's C-spine showed increased signal in the substance of the cord extending into the C1-C2 area. The patient returned to the operating room for T3-T5 decompressive laminectomy and posterolateral decompression including the pedicles, disc, and posterior aspect of the body. Intraoperative ultrasound monitoring showed a good flow of cerebrospinal fluid past the injured segment. RESULTS: On postoperative day 1, the clawing posture of the patient's hands was significantly diminished, and the patient noted an immediate improvement in his hand and arm strength. Over the next few days, the patient's strength in the bilateral upper extremities increased to motor Grade 4/5 on manual testing. A magnetic resonance image 4 weeks after decompression showed significant improvement in the cord diameter and signal. CONCLUSIONS: Post-traumatic syringomyelia has not been reported at so early a stage after injury. This disorder is an important clinical entity that must be recognized to prevent potentially fatal or devastating complications. As evidenced by the reported patient and the literature, if this disorder is discovered and treated early, permanent deficit can be avoided. The prevention of post-traumatic syringomyelia requires anatomic realignment and stabilization of the spine without stenosis, even in the case of complete injuries, to maintain the proper dynamics of cerebrospinal fluid flow.
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3/7. Chronic inflammatory granuloma mimics clinical manifestations of lumbar spinal stenosis after acupuncture: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report and review of the literature. OBJECTIVES: To present a case of chronic inflammatory epidural granuloma formed after acupuncture. SUMMARY OF THE BACKGROUND DATA: A number of cases of complications resulting from acupuncture have been reported, including acute infection, hemorrhage, and direct injury to internal organs or neural tissues. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of epidural granuloma formed following acupuncture and mimicking clinical manifestations of lumbar stenosis. methods: A 68-year-old woman suffered from low back pain and sciatica aggravated by acupuncture. We reviewed her medical record, imaging studies, microscopic findings of the mass, and related literature. RESULTS: Microscopic examination revealed the mass as a chronic inflammatory granuloma. From her previous history and imaging study, the mass, which compressed the lumbar forth nerve and dural sac,was highly suspected to have been formed after acupuncture. Surgical decompression and excision of the epidural mass relieved her symptoms. CONCLUSION: Chronic inflammatory granuloma may be formed as a complication of acupuncture. Under such circumstances, surgical excision of the mass may be an effective way of relieving the symptoms.
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4/7. Accidental intrathecal mercury application.

    The authors present a case of accidental intrathecal mercury application. A 69-year-old white woman was admitted to our department with suspected meningitis following surgery for spinal stenosis at another hospital. Postoperatively, she had developed a cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) fistula with a subcutaneous cavity. Local wound irritation had been suspected and, unfortunately, mercury-containing disinfectant was injected into the cavity. Within 24 h the patient demonstrated acute neurological deterioration due to meningitis and encephalitis and was admitted to our clinic with suspected meningitis due to postoperative CSF fistula. Lumbar puncture revealed desinfectant-stained, non-bloody CSF, while lumbar MRI demonstrated the large lumbar subcutaneous cavity. Additionally, CSF fistula was visualized on MRI. Laboratory examination revealed extremely high mercury levels in CSF, blood and urine. Treatment consisted in insertion of a lumbar drainage to wash out the mercury. The patient underwent medical detoxication using chelating agents (DMPS: RS-2,3-dimercapto-1-propansulfonacid, DMSA: meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinatacid). Surgery was performed in order to close the cavity and the fistula. Postoperatively, the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit and remained intubated for 3 days. Within 4 weeks after surgery, she demonstrated good recovery. Eighteen months after intoxication, polyneuropathy and slight neuropsychological deficiencies were detectable.
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5/7. Recurrent hearing loss after myelography treated with epidural blood patch.

    Transient hearing impairment is a known sequel after various procedures that result in loss of cerebrospinal fluid, such as lumbar puncture, spinal anesthesia and myelography. But persistent or recurrent hearing loss after dural puncture is a rare entity. We present a case with recurrent low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss after myelography. The patient was treated successfully by means of an epidural blood patch, although the conservative treatment was ineffective.
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6/7. Single-puncture myelographic evaluation of epidural block in the young infant.

    A single lumbar puncture myelographic technique is described to evaluate long segment epidural block in the young infant.
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7/7. Postmyelographic CT evaluation of multiple blocks due to metastases.

    A case of intraspinal metastatic carcinoma that presented on combined cervical and lumbar puncture metrizamide myelography as complete blocks at T2 and T12 is described. The extent of disease in the long segment of the spinal canal was inaccessible to conventional myelography. This case illustrates the importance of postmyelogram CT for accurate assessment of disease and for treatment planning.
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