Cases reported "Spinal Stenosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/256. Cervical spine abnormalities in down syndrome.

    down syndrome (DS) is the most common of the chromosomal disorders and manifests abnormalities in several organ systems. While mental retardation, skull and brain anomalies, and the development of Alzheimer-type neuropathological changes in patients greater than age 40 years are well recognized by neurologists and neuropathologists, less appreciated are the various cervical spine abnormalities that can occur. Widening of the anterior atlanto-odontoid distance (AAOD) and atlantooccipital instability occur in up to 21% and 63% of DS patients, respectively, but neurologic complaints are uncommon and rarely are severe enough to contribute to the patient's demise. We present a case of 49-year-old DS patient whose triplegia, subacute progressive respiratory failure, and death could be attributed to severe degenerative joint disease of the cervical spine with osteophyte formation and severe spinal canal stenosis. We provide the first detailed correlation study between pre-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and extensive autoptic dissection in an adult DS patient with cervical spine abnormalities, as well as a review of the literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/256. Circumferential cervical surgery for spondylostenosis with kyphosis in two patients with athetoid cerebral palsy.

    BACKGROUND: patients with athetoid cerebral palsy may develop severe degenerative changes in the cervical spine decades earlier than their normal counterparts due to abnormal cervical motion. methods: Two patients, 48 and 52 years of age, presented with moderate to severe myelopathy (Nurick Grades IV and V). MR and 3-dimensional CT studies demonstrated severe spondylostenosis with kyphosis in both patients. This necessitated multilevel anterior corpectomy with fusion (C2-C7, C3-C7) using fibula and iliac crest autograft and Orion plating, followed by posterior wiring, fusion using Songer cables, and halo placement. RESULTS: Postoperatively, both patients improved, demonstrating only mild or mild to moderate (Nurick Grades II and III) residual myelopathy. Although both fused posteriorly within 3.5 months, the patient with the fibula graft developed a fracture of the anterior C7 body with mild anterior graft migration, and inferior plate extrusion into the C7-T1 interspace. However, because he has remained asymptomatic for 9 months postoperatively, without dysphagia, removal of the plate has not yet been necessary. CONCLUSIONS: patients with athetoid cerebral palsy should undergo early prospective cervical evaluations looking for impending cord compromise. When surgery is indicated, circumferential surgery offers the maximal degree of cord decompression and stabilization with the highest rate of fusion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/256. Unilateral thoracic canal stenosis.

    Two unusual cases of thoracic spinal canal stenosis are reported. The cord compression was a result of unilateral hypertrophy of the lamina and facet joint. Bony decompression resulted in rapid neurological recovery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/256. Atlantoaxial dislocation associated with stenosis of canal at atlas.

    Three rare cases of stenosis of spinal canal at the level of atlas associated with atlantoaxial dislocation are presented. An atlantoaxial lateral mass fixation with plate and screws after posterior midline bony decompression was successfully performed in these cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/256. Atlantal stenosis: a rare cause of quadriparesis in a child. Case report.

    The authors report the case of a 3-year-old boy who suffered from quadriparesis and respiratory distress after failing to execute a somersault properly. neuroimaging revealed spinal cord contusion with marked spinal canal stenosis at the level of the atlas. No subtle instability, occult fracture, or other congenital abnormalities were confirmed. spinal cord contusion with marked canal stenosis is rare, and only several adult cases have been reported. Severe stenosis at the level of the atlas may predispose individuals to severe spinal cord contusion, as occurred in our patient after sustaining trivial trauma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/256. Lumbar radiculopathy secondary to gouty tophi in the filum terminale in a patient without systemic gout: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Gouty arthritis and gouty tophi of the spine are very rare. We present a patient with the clinical manifestations of an intradural tumor and histologically proven gouty deposits in the filum terminale. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: The patient presented with typical symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. There was no evidence of peripheral gout. INTERVENTION: Imaging studies, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrated a 1-cm, round, intradural, calcified lesion at the L3 vertebral level, causing moderate spinal stenosis. The patient underwent a two-level laminectomy and removal of the mass. A pathological examination of the specimen revealed gouty deposits in the region of the filum terminale. CONCLUSION: Spinal involvement in gout is very rare, and intradural gouty deposits have not been previously described. Intradural gout should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intradural masses.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/256. Acute cauda equina syndrome after total knee arthroplasty as a result of epidural anesthesia and spinal stenosis.

    An unusual complication of epidural anesthesia performed for routine total knee arthroplasty is presented. Epidural catheter placement or removal resulted in an acute cauda equina syndrome in a patient with asymptomatic high-grade lumbar spinal stenosis at L3-4. The case is presented along with a literature review.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/256. Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord following cervical spinal cord trauma: a report of five patients.

    Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord is a rare condition which is almost exclusively reported in American football players following cervical hyperextension or hyperflexion trauma. In this entity-neurological symptoms of both arms and legs for a period of up to 15 minutes are observed with complete recovery. We report the characteristics of five patients not involved in contact sport activities with a neuropraxia of the spinal cord following cervical trauma. In four of the five patients, this syndrome was associated with a cervical canal stenosis. Surgical decompression was performed in two patients with progressive neurological symptoms after an initial period of recovery. The cases illustrates that although neuropraxia of the spinal cord is usually seen in athletes, also other persons may be at risk for developing this condition, especially when a preexisting spinal stenosis is present. patients who experienced neuropraxia of the spinal cord should thus be evaluated carefully for the presence of cervical spinal cord abnormalities.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/256. dialysis-related spinal canal stenosis: a clinicopathological study on amyloid deposition and its AGE modification.

    Three cases operated for spinal canal stenosis induced by dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA) were investigated clinicopathologically. Cases were all-male, and had undergone hemodialysis around 20 years. In two cases, cervical plain x-rays showed only minor spondylotic changes. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), myelography, and computed tomography (CT) showed extradural thickness with compression on the cervical spinal cord and cauda equina. In one case cervical x-rays showed typical destructive spondyloarthropathy (DSA), and MRI showed compression myelopathy. Surgical treatment on both cervical and lumbar spine in two cases and on cervical spine only in one case successfully reduced the symptoms. Extradural thickened tissue and ligament flavum obtained during surgery were studied histopathologically and immunostained by using anti-CD68, anti-beta2-microglobulin (beta2m), and anti-advanced glycation end product (AGE) antibody. congo red stain showed diffuse or nodular amyloid deposition, and immunostaining with anti-beta2m and anti-AGE antibodies also demonstrated the same distribution pattern. Thus, beta2m-positive amyloid tissue in the extradural thickness (extradural amyloid deposition) was immunohistochemically demonstrated to be modified with AGE. Inflammatory reaction with histiocytic and giant cell infiltration was also shown around the amyloid tissues. There were CD68-positive cells, and some cells were positive for AGE and beta2m. These findings suggest that beta2m accumulation and inflammatory reaction finally promote destruction of connective tissues. MRI, CT and/or myelography are necessary for diagnosing spinal canal stenosis accompanied by DRA. In conclusion, we propose a more comprehensive concept of dialysis-related spinal canal stenosis, which includes both DSA and myeloradiculopathy induced by extradural thickness.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/256. spinal canal stenosis in L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria.

    We describe 2 brothers with L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria who developed severe spastic tetraparesis in their 30s. They also had an underlying condition of high-grade cervical spinal canal stenosis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. They were operated on to decompress the spine, and the preexisting gait disturbances slowly diminished after the decompression. Since most people with L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria show spastic signs in their legs and arms, we conclude that cervical spinal canal stenosis may be the underlying reason and may be linked to this rare metabolic disorder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Spinal Stenosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.