Cases reported "Splenic Infarction"

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1/26. Massive splenic infarction in cirrhosis: report of a case with spontaneous disappearance of hypersplenism.

    A cirrhotic patient with massive splenic infarction is described. Celiac angiography showed normally opacified splenic artery and vein and a markedly enlarged spleen with large avascular zones. splenic infarction was associated with the spontaneous disappearance of a syndrome of hypersplenism. The spleen was surgically removed. Histological examination showed multiple thromboses of the small arterial and venous vessels. The cause of this infarct remained unclear.
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ranking = 1
keywords = vein
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2/26. Gastric angina secondary to acute thrombosis of celiac artery.

    We report a 48-year-old woman with foregut ischemia with splenic infarct due to isolated celiac artery obstruction. The patient presented with acute-onset pain in the epigastrium 10-15 min after every meal. Investigations revealed obstruction of the celiac artery by artheromatous plaque. This patient had an acute thrombosis, which responded to anticoagulation.
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ranking = 1187.0346407327
keywords = thrombosis
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3/26. Acute cytomegalovirus infection complicated by vascular thrombosis: a case report.

    We present a case report of a previously healthy adult with cytomegalovirus infection that was complicated by extensive mesenteric arterial and venous thrombosis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this syndrome in an immunocompetent individual who had no predisposing risk factors for thrombosis, and it demonstrates the propensity for cytomegalovirus to be involved in vascular disease.
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ranking = 1441.0672570902
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis
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4/26. intestinal obstruction caused by infarcted splenic hemangioma with renal vein thrombosis in a newborn: a case report.

    The spleen in newborns, infants, and children is rarely involved in a variety of pathological processes. These processes may involve an isolated splenic disease or may be a part of a systemic illness. Renal vein thrombosis in infants of diabetic mothers has been reported. We report a case of a newborn with intestinal obstruction caused by an infarcted splenic hemangioma and renal vein thrombosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case with both above-mentioned diagnoses and causes of intestinal obstruction in the English medical literature.
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ranking = 1555.8504026904
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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5/26. Spontaneous nontraumatic intrasplenic pseudoaneurysm: causes, sonographic diagnosis, and prognosis.

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, causes, sonographic features, therapy, and prognosis of nontraumatic intrasplenic pseudoaneurysms (NTISPs), a rare complication of splenic infarction or infiltration by malignant systemic disorders or infectious diseases. methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical and sonographic records of all patients seen at our clinic from July 1985 through December 2000 to identify patients with a sonographic diagnosis of spontaneous nontraumatic splenic rupture. We then examined the features of the resulting cases to identify patients in whom NTISPs were revealed by color Doppler sonography. RESULTS: In total, 41 patients were identified. Among those patients, 5 (12%) had NTISPs. Three of those 5 patients had an underlying malignant disorder (1 case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 2 cases of chronic myelogenous leukemia), and the other 2 had an inflammatory disease (1 case of endocarditis and 1 case of pancreatitis). Three of the patients also had splenic infarctions. Three patients underwent splenectomy; in 2 of them, secondary delayed splenic rupture occurred before or during splenectomy. In 2 other patients, spontaneous thrombosis of the aneurysms occurred (after 16 hours in 1 and 15 days in the other). CONCLUSIONS: NTISPs may occur in about 12% of patients with sonographically detected nontraumatic spontaneous splenic rupture. NTISPs appear to be associated with an increased risk of secondary delayed splenic rupture, although spontaneous thrombosis may occur. Short-term follow-up sonographic examinations, particularly with color Doppler imaging, are recommended for early recognition of progression of NTISPs, which can guide treatment decisions.
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ranking = 474.81385629308
keywords = thrombosis
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6/26. Extensive splenic infarction, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli complicating induction therapy with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) for acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Bleeding is a common complication during initial induction treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Administration of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), which is in routine use for APL in the past decade improves the bleeding tendency dramatically. Nevertheless, thrombotic events have still been reported in a small proportion of APL patients treated with ATRA. Here we describe a case of splenic infarction and life threatening thrombosis in a young patient with APL treated with ATRA. We review the relevant literature and discuss the pathophysiology, risk factors and treatment of this complication occurring during therapy, for APL.
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ranking = 1274.6405299401
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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7/26. Gastric necrosis after an infarction of the spleen: report of a case.

    Gastric necrosis is a rare and often fatal condition. A few reports of gastric necrosis of various etiologies have been published in the literature. This report deals with a case in which gastric necrosis and perforation occurred several years after an infarction of the spleen. Preoperative computed tomography showed the existence of splenic vein thrombosis accompanying splenic infarction. A laparotomy revealed an 8-cm-long laceration with ragged margins in the posterior of the stomach along the greater curvature. Furthermore, massive venous thrombosis was found in the major omentum. As a result, the reduced arterial blood supply and insufficient venous drainage due to splenic venous thrombosis may have together played a major role in the development of gastric necrosis.
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ranking = 767.37363316329
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, venous thrombosis, vein
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8/26. splenic infarction following laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication: management strategies.

    Techniques for mobilizing the greater curve of the stomach during laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) include division of the short gastric vessels (SGV). The splenic artery and vein lie directly posterior to the proper plane of dissection. Uncontrolled bleeding during SGV division places the splenic vessels at risk for inadvertent injury or ligation. We report herein on 2 patients referred to our institution who had left upper quadrant pain and radiographic evidence of segmental splenic infarction (SI) that resulted from a peripheral splenic artery branch injury during LNF. Management strategies included a trial of conservative management and splenectomy for persistent symptoms or complications resulting from SI. Intense inflammation and adhesion formation making laparoscopic splenectomy difficult should be anticipated when operating on the infarcted spleen.
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ranking = 1
keywords = vein
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9/26. splenectomy for massive splenic infarction unmasks paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare disorder characterized by pancytopenia, hemolysis, and thrombosis. Abdominal vein thrombosis is a life-threatening manifestation of this disease. We present a patient with complete spleen necrosis due to thrombosis of the splenic vessels. After splenectomy, other causes of thrombophilia were excluded and the diagnosis of PNH was established. The patient was put on anticoagulation but despite the prophylactic international normalized ratio maintained over the last 18 months of follow-up, he had another episode of intrahepatic thrombosis which was treated with tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis.
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ranking = 971.52918488802
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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10/26. Torted and ruptured wandering spleen presenting as a surgical emergency in pregnancy.

    wandering spleen (WS) is characterised by incomplete fixation of the spleen to its supporting linorenal and gastrosplenic ligaments. It can predispose to life-threatening complications due to torsion of its vascular pedicle, splenic infarction, portal hypertension, and haemorrhage. A 27-year-old, 36-week prima gravida underwent emergency caesarean section for tachycardia and hypotension. A healthy baby girl was delivered. However, she remained shocked despite aggressive fluid therapy and intraoperatively it was noted that there was significant intraperitoneal bleeding and the on-call surgical team was summoned. Midline laparotomy revealed a lacerated, infarcted, hypermobile spleen found with free intraperitoneal bleeding. The unsalvageable spleen was resected and the patient went on to make an excellent recovery. The aetiology of WS is contentious. With an increased frequency among multiparous females of reproductive age, some suggest the hormonal effects of pregnancy as contributing factors. Clinical presentations range from an asymptomatic abdominal mass to acute abdominal pain with hypovolaemic shock. WS poses a serious threat to life due to thrombosis, bleeding, or infarction. Ultrasound scan and CT scan are equally effective in the diagnosis. patients with asymptomatic WS should be treated with elective splenopexy, however, in the acute presentation, splenectomy is the procedure of choice.
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ranking = 237.40692814654
keywords = thrombosis
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