Cases reported "Sporotrichosis"

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1/7. sporothrix meningitis.

    sporothrix schenckii is a fungus commonly found in soil and on plants, wood splinters, rosebush thorns, and decaying vegetation. It is also carried by some wild and domestic animals and rodents. When this organism penetrates the skin of individuals handling contaminated substances, the cutaneous manifestation may be lymphangitic or fixed. The treatment of choice for the cutaneous form of the disease (sporotrichosis) is potassium iodide. If iodides are contraindicated or not tolerated, itraconazole may be used. sporotrichosis can persist for years if unrecognized and can progress to systemic forms, including osteoarticular, pulmonary (may occur when the organism is inhaled), and meningeal involvement. Systemic forms can be life-threatening and very difficult to treat. Primary care providers must be familiar with this disorder and its presentation because it is easily mistaken for a bacterial infection and inappropriately treated.
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2/7. Zoonotic sporothricosis transmitted by cats in Rio de Janeiro, brazil. A case report.

    Sporotricosis is a ubiquitous mycosis characterized by nodular lesions of the cutaneous or subcutaneous tissues and adjacent lymphatics that usually suppurate and ulcerate. Secondary spread to the articular surface and bone or dissemination to the central nervous system, genitourinary tract or lungs is also possible. All forms of sporothricosis are caused by a single species, sporothrix schenkii. In the great majority of cases the fungus gains entrance into the body through trauma to the skin with some kind of plant materials such as thorns or splinters. Zoonotic transmission is also possible and several animals are implicated. This kind of transmission is most frequently a professional hazard of people dealing with animals but in some parts of the world, including Rio de Janeiro city and metropolitan region, an increase in transmission by pet cats has been noted. In these cases the infection may be observed in the family environment, an important epidemiological consideration to clinicians.
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3/7. A case of sporotrichosis treated with itraconazole.

    Lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis is caused by sporothrix schenckii, a dimorphic fungus commonly existing on decaying plants and in the soil. The fungus has a worldwide distribution but is more prevalent in temperate and tropical climates. infection may result from traumatic inoculation of contaminated material such as soil, hay, moss, plant debris, splinters, thorns and barbs. Inoculation is also possible through some animal scratches and bites. We describe a typical case of lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis, which was confirmed by clinical, histological and microbiological features. The patient was successfully treated with 400 mg daily systemic itraconazole for 4 months.
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4/7. sporotrichosis following a rodent bite. A case report.

    A ten year old boy developed lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis following a wild rodent bite. The infection was successfully treated with potassium iodide. sporotrichosis in humans has followed bites, pecks and stings inflicted by a variety of animals, birds and insects. Many species of animals are susceptible to infection by sporothrix schenkii, but transmission from infected animals to man is uncommon.
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5/7. Cutaneous sporotrichosis in thailand: first reported case.

    A case of cutaneous sporotrichosis is reported for the first time in thailand. The infection occurred in a 33-year-old Thai female who has been in good health and had no history of previous trauma or contact with any animals. Histopathology revealed pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia of the epidermis and a combination of granulomatous and pyogenic reactions in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Typical asteroid bodies (Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon) with central yeast cells were seen. sporothrix schenckii was recovered from skin biopsy specimens. The patient responded well to the treatment with saturated solutions of potassium iodide within three months. No recurrence was seen after more than six months follow-up.
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6/7. Feline sporotrichosis: a report of five cases with transmission to humans.

    sporotrichosis was diagnosed in five cats. Seven humans exposed to these cats subsequently developed the disease. All feline cases developed draining ulcers, and in four of five cases there was disseminated cutaneous involvement. Histologically, numerous sporothrix organisms were noted in cutaneous lesions and overlying exudate. The seven humans who became infected were involved in cleaning and medicating cats with the disease; all human patients developed a localized lymphocutaneous form of sporotrichosis. In four of the human cases there was no history of an associated penetrating wound. The large number of sporothrix organisms is a distinct feature of feline sporotrichosis and indicates that the cat may be the only domestic animal species that can readily transmit this disease to humans. In addition, any contact with the draining lesions of affected cats offers the potential for human infection.
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7/7. Isolation of sporothrix schenckii in the soil in israel in relation to a new case in man.

    A new case, the third in israel, of subcutaneous sporotrichosis is presented. A pigmentary strain of sporothrix schenckii was cultured from the unopened and necrotic nodules of the left hand and forearm of an 80-year-old male. Experimental inoculation of the isolated fungus into mice led to the dissemination of the organism in the liver, kidneys and lungs inoculated intraperitoneally, and the development of orchitis with abscess formation in those inoculated intratesticularly. In both groups of mice the causative agent was successfully recovered. Three months of treatment with oral potassium iodide led to the disappearance of the lesions. The source of contamination was found to be the soil adhering to fragments of wood. Two strains of a fungus, morphologically identical to the human S. schenckii, were isolated through the mouse procedure and agar-plating method from soil samples collected in the vicinity of the patient's residence. The soil isolates also proved to be pathogenic in animal inoculation. This is the first isolation of S. schenckii from soils in israel. The possible relationships between the soil isolates and Ceratocystis stenoceras are discussed.
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