Cases reported "Sporotrichosis"

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11/16. sporothrix schenckii inoculation on the abdomen.

    sporotrichosis is usually transmitted by cutaneous inoculation and is, therefore, most often seen on the face, extremities, and other exposed areas. We have described the case of a pilot who contracted sporotrichosis overseas and in whom the initial lesion was on the abdomen. Since the patient reported that he had been bitten by an insect at that site, the diagnosis of leishmaniasis had been strongly considered.
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ranking = 1
keywords = leishmaniasis
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12/16. sporothrix schenckii endophthalmitis presenting as granulomatous uveitis.

    sporothrix schenckii occurs worldwide as a chronic subcutaneous mycotic infection, but can result in intraocular infection of cryptogenic origin without evident systemic infection. A case of S schenckii endophthalmitis is presented without a history of trauma or systemic infection originally diagnosed as granulomatous uveitis that resulted in scleral perforation.
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ranking = 0.00010029787050768
keywords = world
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13/16. Nodular lymphangitis: a distinctive but often unrecognized syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To describe nodular lymphangitis by reviewing the clinical and epidemiologic features of this disease with an emphasis on distinguishing specific etiologic agents. DATA SOURCES: English-language articles were identified through a medline search (1966 to September 1992) using sporotrichosis, lymphangitis, and sporotrichoid as key words; additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. In addition, three new patients with nodular lymphangitis are described. STUDY SELECTION: One hundred fifty articles were reviewed to determine details of the etiologic agents and clinical signs and symptoms of patients with nodular lymphangitis. DATA SYNTHESIS: Nodular lymphangitis develops most commonly after cutaneous inoculation with sporothrix schenckii, Nocardia brasiliensis, mycobacterium marinum, leishmania braziliensis, and francisella tularensis. The setting in which infection is acquired is useful in differentiating among the various organisms causing infection. sporotrichosis and leishmaniasis can have longer incubation periods than do the other common causes of nodular lymphangitis. A painful ulcer at the site of the initial lesion suggests tularemia; frankly purulent drainage often accompanies infections with Francisella and Nocardia species. Ulcerated or suppurating lymphangitic nodules occur commonly with nocardia infections. patients with nodular lymphangitis who fail to respond to empiric treatment for sporotrichosis should be evaluated for other organisms with appropriate biopsies and cultures. CONCLUSIONS: Nodular lymphangitis has distinctive clinical signs and symptoms, most commonly due to infection with a limited number of organisms. A detailed history, accompanied by information obtained from skin biopsy specimens using appropriate stains and cultures, should allow specific, effective therapy for most of these infections.
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ranking = 1
keywords = leishmaniasis
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14/16. Lymphocutaneous nocardiosis due to nocardia brasiliensis.

    A farmer had chaining lymphocutaneous granuloma on the right hand and arm. Clinically the syndrome seemed typical for sporotrichosis. Bacteriological examination revealed Nocardia brasiliensis as the only etiologic agent. Since 1920, eight similar cases of sporotrichoid nocardiosis have been reported from various parts of the world. To our knowledge, isolation of N brasiliensis has not been reported previously in this geographical area.
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ranking = 0.00010029787050768
keywords = world
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15/16. Fatal fungaemia due to sporothrix schenckii.

    A clinical case is reported of a 78-year-old male with antecedents of diabetes and alcoholism who was hospitalized because he showed cutaneous lesions on the face and extremities suggesting cutaneous tuberculosis, but after a first histological study cutaneous leishmaniasis was erroneously diagnosed. Because of some unusual characteristics of the patient, the skin biopsies were carefully re-examined, as well as blood smears, which revealed elongated yeast form-like cells suggestive of sporothrix schenckii. The diagnosis was confirmed when the fungus grew in mice and in Sabouraud cultures inoculated with blood samples from the patient. It is recommended that Sp. schenckii is included in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative cutaneous lesions in patients from Mexican humid areas.
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ranking = 1
keywords = leishmaniasis
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16/16. Sporotrichoid cutaneous leishmaniasis in a traveler.

    A 19-year-old construction worker from virginia who had traveled in bolivia had sporotrichoid lesions on the left arm. Only after unsuccessful therapy for sporotrichosis was a diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis considered. Biopsies revealed necrotizing granulomatous changes, and culture of the biopsy specimens grew Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. The sporotrichoid pattern seen in this patient is a rare but recognized presentation of cutaneous leishmaniasis, more commonly seen in American cutaneous leishmaniasis than in Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis. This case illustrates the necessity of careful and early consideration of tropical infections in the differential diagnosis of disease in a traveler.
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ranking = 8
keywords = leishmaniasis
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