Cases reported "Sporotrichosis"

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1/7. Cutaneous New World leishmaniasis-sporotrichosis coinfection: report of 3 cases.

    Three cases of coinfection with Leishmania and sporothrix spp in the same lesion are described. The patients had ulcers with erythematous borders and regional lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis of leishmaniasis was accomplished by direct visualization of the amastigotes or culture of the promastigotes, or both. The diagnosis of sporotrichosis was proved in two cases by culture of sporothrix schenckii and by the histopathologic features in one case. All patients had a positive sporotrichin test. Two patients responded successfully to oral potassium iodide. One patient received oral itraconazole 100 mg/day because of intolerance to iodides and was cured. To our knowledge coinfection with Leishmania and sporothrix spp has not been reported. The use of empirical treatments for leishmaniasis such as poultices or puncturing of the lesion with thorns or woods splinters might introduce sporothrix and explain the coinfection.
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2/7. Sporotrichoid leishmaniasis.

    American leishmaniasis that is acquired in panama may appear clinically as a sporotrichoid eruption. When leisons reminiscent of sporotrichosis are encountered, a careful history of the patient's travels should be made, as well as a search for the organism of leischmaniasis in tissue smears, histopathological sections, and cultured media. We report the case of an American soldier stationed in panama who had developed an ulcer on the dorsum of his right wrist, and nodules on his right forearm that were arranged in a linear pattern. The initial clinical impression was that of sporotrichosis, but on careful study of the patient's history, and after other appropriate investigations were made, it was discovered that the patient had leishmaniasis.
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3/7. Sporotrichoid leishmaniasis in patients from saudi arabia: clinical and histologic features.

    The clinical and pathologic presentations of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the various countries of the middle east are well documented. The defined patterns currently encountered in the region emphasize the rarity of local extension of the infection from the bite site. Between 1970 and 1980 we have seen 24 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis who acquired the infection in saudi arabia. In these patients there were several interesting variations from the hitherto described patterns of Oriental sore. The variations include, clinically, the appearance of satellite lesions and the presence of sporotrichoid spread of infection; and histologically, the presence of stellate intradermal abscesses. Such variations in the clinical and pathologic presentations may be due to differences either in the host's immunologic reactivity or in the Leishmania organisms found in saudi arabia. Speculative evidence supports the possibility of a different strain and/or species of leishmania tropica in saudi arabia, which in turn may be responsible for this unique clinicopathologic presentation.
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4/7. sporothrix schenckii inoculation on the abdomen.

    sporotrichosis is usually transmitted by cutaneous inoculation and is, therefore, most often seen on the face, extremities, and other exposed areas. We have described the case of a pilot who contracted sporotrichosis overseas and in whom the initial lesion was on the abdomen. Since the patient reported that he had been bitten by an insect at that site, the diagnosis of leishmaniasis had been strongly considered.
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5/7. Nodular lymphangitis: a distinctive but often unrecognized syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To describe nodular lymphangitis by reviewing the clinical and epidemiologic features of this disease with an emphasis on distinguishing specific etiologic agents. DATA SOURCES: English-language articles were identified through a medline search (1966 to September 1992) using sporotrichosis, lymphangitis, and sporotrichoid as key words; additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. In addition, three new patients with nodular lymphangitis are described. STUDY SELECTION: One hundred fifty articles were reviewed to determine details of the etiologic agents and clinical signs and symptoms of patients with nodular lymphangitis. DATA SYNTHESIS: Nodular lymphangitis develops most commonly after cutaneous inoculation with sporothrix schenckii, Nocardia brasiliensis, mycobacterium marinum, leishmania braziliensis, and francisella tularensis. The setting in which infection is acquired is useful in differentiating among the various organisms causing infection. sporotrichosis and leishmaniasis can have longer incubation periods than do the other common causes of nodular lymphangitis. A painful ulcer at the site of the initial lesion suggests tularemia; frankly purulent drainage often accompanies infections with Francisella and Nocardia species. Ulcerated or suppurating lymphangitic nodules occur commonly with nocardia infections. patients with nodular lymphangitis who fail to respond to empiric treatment for sporotrichosis should be evaluated for other organisms with appropriate biopsies and cultures. CONCLUSIONS: Nodular lymphangitis has distinctive clinical signs and symptoms, most commonly due to infection with a limited number of organisms. A detailed history, accompanied by information obtained from skin biopsy specimens using appropriate stains and cultures, should allow specific, effective therapy for most of these infections.
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6/7. Fatal fungaemia due to sporothrix schenckii.

    A clinical case is reported of a 78-year-old male with antecedents of diabetes and alcoholism who was hospitalized because he showed cutaneous lesions on the face and extremities suggesting cutaneous tuberculosis, but after a first histological study cutaneous leishmaniasis was erroneously diagnosed. Because of some unusual characteristics of the patient, the skin biopsies were carefully re-examined, as well as blood smears, which revealed elongated yeast form-like cells suggestive of sporothrix schenckii. The diagnosis was confirmed when the fungus grew in mice and in Sabouraud cultures inoculated with blood samples from the patient. It is recommended that Sp. schenckii is included in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative cutaneous lesions in patients from Mexican humid areas.
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keywords = leishmaniasis
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7/7. Sporotrichoid cutaneous leishmaniasis in a traveler.

    A 19-year-old construction worker from virginia who had traveled in bolivia had sporotrichoid lesions on the left arm. Only after unsuccessful therapy for sporotrichosis was a diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis considered. Biopsies revealed necrotizing granulomatous changes, and culture of the biopsy specimens grew Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. The sporotrichoid pattern seen in this patient is a rare but recognized presentation of cutaneous leishmaniasis, more commonly seen in American cutaneous leishmaniasis than in Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis. This case illustrates the necessity of careful and early consideration of tropical infections in the differential diagnosis of disease in a traveler.
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