Cases reported "Staphylococcal Infections"

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1/9. Toxic shock syndrome originating from the foot.

    The most familiar etiology of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is that of menstruation and tampon use. Nonmenstrual TSS has been described in all types of wounds including postsurgical, respiratory infection, mucous membrane disruption, burns, and vesicular lesions caused by varicella and shingles. A case of TSS occurring in a diabetic male patient with foot blisters is presented. Early recognition by an infectious disease specialist and appropriate medical management led to complete recovery. There have been no reported cases of staphylococcus aureus TSS originating in the foot to date.
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keywords = menstruation
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2/9. Toxic shock syndrome associated with staphylococcus aureus sinusitis in children.

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a severe, acute, multisystem illness associated with rash and shock. It is usually associated with a focal infection (e.g., during menstruation associated with tampon use, abscess, surgical wound infection) caused by certain staphylococcus aureus strains. Identification and drainage of the focus of infection may be important in therapy. Occasionally, a focus of infection is not obvious, requiring additional diagnostic procedures. Three cases of children with TSS associated with sinusitis and no other focus of S. aureus infection are presented, demonstrating the important consideration of the perinasal sinuses as a cryptic focus of S. aureus infection causing TSS.
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keywords = menstruation
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3/9. Persistent bactericidal defect in neutrophils from a young woman who recovered from toxic shock syndrome.

    We have previously found transient menstruation-associated abnormalities in the in vitro bactericidal function of neutrophils from females who have recovered from toxic shock syndrome (TSS). We now report the case of a young woman who has also recovered from TSS, but who has a persistent, non-menstruation-associated defect in the ability of her neutrophils to kill staphylococcus aureus in vitro.
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keywords = menstruation
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4/9. Toxic shock syndrome after chemical face peel.

    Two cases of toxic shock syndrome following chemical face peel are reported. Toxic shock syndrome is a severe toxin-mediated multisystem disease. The major signs are fever, rash, desquamation, and hypotension. It can occur in males as well as females and is not necessarily related to menstruation. The surgical wound does not usually appear infected. Early recognition is the hallmark of successful treatment. Therapy is symptomatic, with aggressive administration of fluids. Antistaphylococcal agents are used. Prophylactic antibiotics are not necessarily recommended.
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keywords = menstruation
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5/9. mastitis and toxic shock syndrome (tampon disease).

    The present report draws attention to the toxic shock syndrome in combination with non-menstruation-associated disease. A patient with mastitis and TSS is described. The relevant literature is reviewed and discussed in relation to this patient. physicians should be alert for TSS when a patient presents with non-understood shock and fever in the absence of positive blood cultures, even when there is no relation to menstruation or no history of previous use of tampons.
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keywords = menstruation
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6/9. Toxic-shock syndrome not associated with menstruation. A review of 54 cases.

    An increasing proportion of reported cases of toxic-shock syndrome (TSS) are not associated with menstruation (13.2% of reported cases with onset in 1981). The 54 cases of TSS not associated with menstruation reported through the U.S.A. national surveillance system between January, 1980, and June, 1981, were either associated with staphylococcus aureus infections (cutaneous or subcutaneous lesions, infected surgical wounds, bursitis, mastitis, adenitis, lung abscess, or primary bacteraemia) or followed childbirth by vaginal delivery and caesarean section. patients with TSS not associated with menstruation differed significantly in age and racial distributions from those with menstruation-associated TSS, and 17 of them were male. The clinical features of TSS not associated with menstruation and the characteristics of the S. aureus strains isolated from these patients were similar to those observed in TSS related to menstruation. The median incubation period of the disease in the post-surgical cases was 2 days. TSS can occur in many clinical settings in patients of both sexes and of all ages and racial groups.
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keywords = menstruation
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7/9. Toxic-shock syndrome in menstruating women: association with tampon use and staphylococcus aureus and clinical features in 52 cases.

    To determine the risk factors associated with toxic-shock syndrome (TSS) in menstruating women, we conducted a retrospective telephone study of 52 cases and 52 age-matched and sex-matched controls. Fifty-two cases and 44 controls used tampons (P < 0.02). Moreover, in case-control pairs in which both women used tampons, cases were more likely than controls to use tampons throughout menstruation (42 of 44 vs. 34 of 44, respectively; P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in brand of tampon used, degree of absorbency specified on label, frequency of tampon change, type of contraceptive used, frequency of sexual intercourse, or sexual intercourse during menstruation. Fourteen of 44 cases had one or more definite or probable recurrences during a subsequent menstrual period. In a separate study, staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 62 of 64 women with TSS and from seven of 71 vaginal cultures obtained from healthy controls (P < 0.001).
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keywords = menstruation
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8/9. Toxic shock syndrome associated with suction-assisted lipectomy.

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition resulting from an exotoxin of staphylococcus aureus. Presenting symptoms include high fever, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting progressing to hypotension, oliguria, conjunctival hyperemia, and an erythematous rash over the trunk, abdomen, and extremities. TSS has been associated both with and without the use of tampons during menstruation, postsurgical infections, and stab wounds, and can occur in postrhinoplasty patients with and without nasal packing. There has been one case reported in the literature of TSS associated with suction-assisted lipectomy (SAL). This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of two cases in which the patients developed TSS after outpatient use of SAL. In the first case, an abdominoplasty and SAL were performed in a healthy young female. The second case involved the harvesting of abdominal fat via syringe suction and subsequent facial fat injection in a female with systemic lupus erythematosus and severe facial atrophy.
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keywords = menstruation
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9/9. Case report: toxic shock syndrome arising from cellulitis.

    Toxic shock syndrome is a febrile, multiorgan illness related to toxins elaborated by staphylococcal or streptococcal infections. In the 1980s, most cases were associated with menstruation. More recently, many cases now are unrelated to menses. In this article, the authors describe a case of a nonmenstruating woman with toxic shock syndrome, associated with cellulitis of her arm. Cultures of the arm grew Staphylococcal aureus, which produced enterotoxin B.
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keywords = menstruation
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