Cases reported "Staphylococcal Infections"

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1/150. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in deep sternal wound infection after heart transplantation.

    The results of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHTx) are still burdened with considerable early mortality due to graft rejection or infection. sternum osteomyelitis is an infrequent postoperative complication. We report a case of deep sternal wound infection (2 months after OHTx) that was treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy in addition to local surgical treatment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound infection, wound
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2/150. Use of hyperbaric oxygen and negative pressure therapy in the multidisciplinary care of a patient with nonhealing wounds.

    The case of a 55-year-old woman with nonhealing wounds located on the sternum, abdomen, and lower left extremities is described. The wounds were related to surgical incisions from coronary artery bypass grafting and were complicated by respiratory insufficiency, diabetes mellitus, and infection. This article presents a brief overview of the collaborative care provided in this case and a pictorial review of this patient's wounds during a 4-month period.
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ranking = 0.016970055002442
keywords = wound
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3/150. Intrathoracic application of the reverse latissimus dorsi muscle flap.

    The use of the reverse latissimus dorsi muscle flap based on its paraspinous perforators for posterior trunk wound coverage has been described previously. However, few studies have reported its intrathoracic application. In this study the authors present their experience in treating 3 patients with various intrathoracic defects using the reverse latissimus dorsi muscle flap. There were 1 male and 2 female patients who ranged in age from 4 to 74 years (mean, 49 years). The etiology included an infected aortic graft, a bronchopleural fistula, and a recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 24 months. Successful outcomes were achieved in all 3 patients, and there was no recurrence or wound complication identified. Their results demonstrate the versatility and reliability of the reverse latissimus dorsi muscle flap in treating low posterior intrathoracic defects.
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ranking = 0.0048485871435548
keywords = wound
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4/150. Smitten by a kitten.

    Mammalian bite wounds are commonly encountered in the emergency department. When patients come early (<8 hours after injury), local infection is not usually evident. At this stage, the issue of providing prophylactic antibiotic therapy arises. We report a complication of a cat bite to the hand in a previously healthy 32-year-old man. This patient did not seek medical treatment immediately after the cat bite, and distinct local infection did not develop. Nevertheless, his course was complicated with acute staphylococcus aureus endocarditis. We discuss the common pathogens involved in a cat bite infection, including S aureus, and delineate the indications for prophylactic antibiotic therapy after a mammalian bite wound.
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ranking = 0.0048485871435548
keywords = wound
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5/150. Transthoracic fistula with erosion of the ascending aorta along an IMA-protecting graft.

    Internal mammary artery (IMA) graft protection with nonbiodegradable material, such as polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is recognized as an effective means for preventing overexuberant adhesion development as well as injury of retrosternally crossing arterial grafts in the event of resternotomy and should enable better identification of the IMA graft. It is still uncertain whether the use of PTFE material is suitable for diabetic patients with complete arterial revascularization due to potential infectious complications. We report on a young diabetic patient after arterial T-grafting due to severe coronary disease and readmission with wound infection and retrosternal fistula formation 8 months after operation.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = wound infection, wound
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6/150. Persistent wound infection after herniotomy associated with small-colony variants of staphylococcus aureus.

    A small-colony variant (SCV) of staphylococcus aureus was cultured from a patient with a persistent wound infection (abscess and fistula) 13 months after herniotomy. The strain was nonhemolytic, nonpigmented and grew only anaerobically on Schaedler agar. As it was coagulase-negative, it was initially misidentified as a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. In further analysis, however, the microorganism was shown to be an auxotroph that reverted to normal growth and morphology in the presence of menadione and hemin (Schaedler agar) and could be identified as a SCV of staphylococcus aureus. Surgery and antibiotic treatment of the patient with flucloxacillin and rifampicin for 4 weeks resulted in healing of the chronic wound infection.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = wound infection, wound
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7/150. Molecular phylogenetic evidence for noninvasive zoonotic transmission of staphylococcus intermedius from a canine pet to a human.

    rRNA-based molecular phylogenetic techniques were used to identify the bacterial species present in the ear fluid from a female patient with otitis externa. We report the identification of staphylococcus intermedius from the patient and a possible route of transmission. Analysis of 16S ribosomal dna restriction fragment length polymorphisms indicated that the dominant species present was S. intermedius. A pet dog owned by the patient also was tested and found to harbor S. intermedius. In humans, the disease is rare and considered a zoonosis. Previously, S. intermedius has been associated with dog bite wounds, catheter-related injuries, and surgery. This study represents the first reported case of a noninvasive infection with S. intermedius.
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ranking = 0.0024242935717774
keywords = wound
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8/150. A case of myiasis in man due to Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Schiner) recorded near rome.

    In this report the case of a 14-year-old Italian boy is described in whom scratching wounds of the scalp were invaded by maggots of the dipterous Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Schiner).
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ranking = 0.0024242935717774
keywords = wound
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9/150. Neonatal myiasis.

    This case involves an orphan female neonate-abandoned in a dustbin in Poona, india-who was infected by the larval forms of the blowfly. The blowfly causing this infestation belonged to the family Calliphoridae and genus Calliphora. The fly of this genus is of importance in Indian veterinary science and is found abundantly around decaying matter in Poona. The larvae occurring in carrion, flesh, etc, usually infest open wounds of animals and rarely infest humans.
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ranking = 0.0024242935717774
keywords = wound
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10/150. Acquired subglottic stenosis caused by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus that produce epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor.

    Local infection of the trachea in intubated neonates is one of the main risk factors for development of acquired subglottic stenosis, although its role in the pathogenesis is unclear. methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is often the cause of critical illness in neonatal patients. Two cases are reported of acquired subglottic stenosis following bacterial infection of the trachea, suggesting an association with the staphylococcal exotoxin, epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor (EDIN). EDIN-producing MRSA were isolated from purulent tracheal secretions from both infants. Acquired subglottic stenosis in both cases was probably caused by delayed wound healing as the result of EDIN inhibition of epithelial cell migration.
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ranking = 0.0024242935717774
keywords = wound
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