Cases reported "Staphylococcal Infections"

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21/150. Treatment of a wound infection in a patient with mantle cell lymphoma.

    This case study examines the impact of a severe wound infection on a patient undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma. The study illustrates how life threatening an infection can become in a patient whose body is compromised as a consequence of both disease and chemotherapy treatment. A number of specialist products were required in order to overcome the infection, debride and heal the wound. These included larval therapy, vacuum-assisted closure and leptospermum honey. While this case study focuses on the successful outcome of one particular patient it aims to raise awareness of the role of specialist products, both old and new, in improving healing rates of complex wounds.
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keywords = wound infection, wound
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22/150. Successful medical management of multifocal psoas abscess following cesarean section: report of a case and review of the literature.

    The psoas abscess is a rare complication in obstetric and gynaecology. Two types of psoas abscess are recognized. The primary psoas abscess is generally following haematogenous dissemination of an infectious agent and the source is usually occult. The most frequently isolated pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus. On the other hand, the secondary abscess is the result of local extension of an infectious process near the psoas muscle. We report the case of a patient who develops a bacteremia from an infected cesarean section wound. The complications were thigh and psoas abscesses with left sacroiliitis. Medical management with prolonged antibiotherapy permit clinical, biological and radiological improvement. Although it required a long hospital stay, medical treatment alone was effective. More experience is required to determine which therapeutic option: medical treatment and/or surgery, is the best choice for this type of complication.
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ranking = 0.0024125958903608
keywords = wound
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23/150. A case of rupture of the internal jugular vein caused by postoperative infection of functional neck dissection.

    A 68-year old diabetic man with gingival cancer of the lower jaw underwent resection of the mandible and functional neck dissection. Swabs of a postoperative wound infection revealed methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The wound was irrigated, and antibiotics administered. The pathogens isolated were sensitive to the antibiotics used, but the infection failed to respond to treatment. Bleeding ensued on the 14th postoperative day (#14POD), when the wound was opened to reveal thrombosis and rupture of the right internal jugular vein. The patient's condition improved after ligation and surgical debridement of the right internal jugular vein. Our experience underlines the importance of early radiological investigation for possible thrombus formation in the internal jugular vein in cases of postoperative wound infection follows functional neck dissection with conservation of the internal jugular vein. It is also important to actively treat this condition surgically, including ligation of internal jugular vein for suppressing inflammation.
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ranking = 0.40289511506843
keywords = wound infection, wound
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24/150. Breastfeeding and Staphylococcus aureus: three case reports.

    This paper presents three case reports of breastfeeding women with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections. The first case is a woman who developed recurrent staphylococcal skin infections, misdiagnosed as a fungal infection by her caregivers. The second case is a woman who experienced recurrent mastitis following a severe wound infection in her caesarean section scar; both she and her baby were carriers of S. aureus. The third case is a woman who experienced mastitis and a breast abscess, while her baby and other members of the family developed recurrent boils and skin infections with a methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A wide range of staphylococcal infections may occur in the postpartum period: mastitis, abscess, caesarean scar infection, boils and skin infection. Some cases of recurrent infections may be related to nasal carriage in mother or infant. microscopy can be useful in differentiating bacterial infections from fungal infections and confirming nasal carriage. When mothers or infants are nasal carriers of Staphylococci health professionals may recommend nasal mupirocin (Bactroban) and bathing with antiseptic washes to reduce recurrent staphylococcal infections.
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ranking = 0.19903496164386
keywords = wound infection, wound
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25/150. Use of sugar in the treatment of infected leg ulcers.

    Mrs R is an 84-year-old retired shop-keeper with a 17-year history of recurrent leg ulceration. She has received treatment in both primary and secondary care settings, including specialist dermatology and vascular clinics. Mrs R has a long history of non-compliance to treatment regime, removing bandages and rucking them down causing compression injuries that almost resulted in amputation of her right leg. On assessment by the author, she had two partial thickness ulcers to each leg, signs of venous insufficiency and malnutrition, and swabs cultured positive for a range of bacteria. Resistance to topical antimicrobials and allergy to systemic antibiotics meant that another solution had to be tried to relieve the bacterial load on Mrs R's wounds.
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ranking = 0.0024125958903608
keywords = wound
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26/150. Recurrent methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus wound ulcer after clear-cornea cataract surgery.

    PURPOSE: To present a case of recurrent, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) wound ulcer after clear-cornea cataract surgery. methods: Case report. RESULTS: An 82-year-old man underwent an uncomplicated phacoemulsification procedure with posterior-chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL) implantation. Two weeks after surgery, a corneal ulcer was present at the wound site. Corneal tissue sample cultures produced methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. The ulcer responded to high-dose vancomycin but recurred twice as vancomycin was tapered. Lamellar keratectomy with conjunctival flap was performed at 6 months after surgery, with no additional ulcer recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: wound infection after clear-cornea cataract surgery occurs infrequently. Management of these infections, however, can provide challenging clinical decisions.
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ranking = 0.014475575342165
keywords = wound
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27/150. Fate of chronically infected onlay mesh in groin wound.

    This case report throws some light on the way in which the body handles an infected onlay mesh following groin hernia repair. It describes the case of a 73-year-old man who developed this rare complication and demonstrates the mechanism by which this complication occurred.
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ranking = 0.0096503835614433
keywords = wound
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28/150. Deoxyribonucleic acid fingerprinting in an outbreak of Staphylococcus aureus intracranial infection after neurotologic surgery.

    BACKGROUND: meningitis is the most common life-threatening infection occurring as an early postoperative complication of neurotologic surgery. From January to March 2001, Staphylococcus aureus intracranial infection developed in three patients; two cases were consecutive. methods: All staff members involved in surgery on any of the three patients had nasal swabs for S. aureus. The three patient isolates and all S. aureus isolates from staff members were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Operating room procedures were reviewed. RESULTS: All three patient isolates were identical by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Six staff members (40%) were found to be S. aureus carriers. The isolate from one staff members was identical to the patient isolates. A procedure audit of the operating room revealed several breaks in recommended practice. The staff carrier was immediately removed from patient care duties, given decolonization therapy, and treated for chronic rhinosinusitis. Practice changes in the operating room were implemented. CONCLUSIONS: S. aureus remains a common cause of surgical site infections. S. aureus carriage is common, and carriers with intercurrent respiratory infections have increased shedding and are a higher risk to patients. Proper use of barrier devices and consistent hand hygiene reduce bacterial contamination of the wound. Current operating room technology involves technical personnel not traditionally trained in operating room procedures. Epidemiologic investigation may be delayed if operating room records are incomplete with respect to these personnel. molecular typing of bacterial isolates can identify common source outbreaks and effectively focus investigations.
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ranking = 0.0024125958903608
keywords = wound
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29/150. Rapid healing of MRSA infection at the suprafascial radial donor site.

    methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection at the radial suprafascial donor site resulted in significant loss of the skin graft, but no tendon exposure, in two patients. The complication was successfully managed with wound debridement, appropriate antibiotics, a negative-pressure wound dressing and early partial-thickness skin grafting. The suprafascial dissection creates a donor site that resists both skin graft loss and tendon exposure. It also allows early re-grafting with no loss of function in the event of skin graft loss from infection. These advantages have not been described previously.
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ranking = 0.0048251917807217
keywords = wound
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30/150. osteomyelitis following puncture wounds of the foot in children.

    review of the laboratory and clinical findings and treatment of eight patients with osteomyelitis of the foot after puncture wounds revealed that: 1) osteomyelitis after puncture wounds is a infrequent but potentially serious complication, with significant morbidity; 2) osteomyelitis is frequently preceded by inadequate primary care for simple puncture wounds, and when treatment is appropriate, osteomyelitis usually can be avoided; 3) P. aeruginosa is the most commonly recovered organism; 4) the clinical presentation is characterized by a lack of systemic toxicity, paucity of laboratory abnormalities, and evidence of a localized infection process and the patient may be asymptomatic for a few days to several months after the injury before presentation of the osteomyelitis; and 5) once the infection has become established, treatment must be aggressive, including surgical debridement.
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ranking = 0.016888171232526
keywords = wound
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