Cases reported "Status Epilepticus"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/102. Clinical experience of three pediatric and one adult case of spike-and-wave status epilepticus treated with injectable valproic acid.

    Subclinical or nonconvulsive status epilepticus may cause severe postmorbid neurologic dysfunction. It is, therefore, critical to rapidly identify and treat these cases. The recent availability of injectable valproic acid (Depacon) provides an additional method for treatment of status epilepticus, although studies concerning its effectiveness are not widely available in the literature. We report four cases (three pediatric, one adult) of patients who presented to us in status epilepticus. All had previously failed more than one other common method of treatment for this condition. Treatment with injectable valproic acid resulted in the elimination of all clinical indications of status epilepticus as well as a return to the baseline EEG condition in all four cases. Seizure types included focal, multifocal, and generalized spike and wave forms, suggesting potential benefit from injectable valproic acid treatment in a wide range of status epilepticus patients. We present these cases for review.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/102. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus in childhood localization-related epilepsy.

    PURPOSE: To report on three children with localization-related epilepsy who exhibited minor seizures (atypical absences, brief atonic, and myoclonic) and nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) consisting of these minor seizures, and to elucidate their significance. methods: We studied the electroclinical characteristics of these children. Ictal electroencephalograms (EEGs) of NCSE were evaluated by using simultaneous video-EEG-electromyogram (EMG) polygraphic recordings. RESULTS: All patients began to have partial seizures between the ages of 6 months and 2 years 7 months, with minor seizures appearing later, between the ages of 1 year 11 months and 6 years 6 months. These minor seizures evolved into NCSE. Complex partial seizures remained after suppression of the minor seizures. Interictal EEGs taken when the minor seizures appeared showed excessive diffuse epileptic discharges in addition to multifocal spike-waves. Before and after suppression of the minor seizures, focal epileptic discharges predominated on the EEGs. On ictal EEGs of brief atonic and myoclonic seizures, diffuse spike-wave and polyspike-wave bursts were detected. Ictal EEGs of the atypical absences revealed diffuse spike-wave bursts mixed with irregular high-voltage slow waves, often interspersed with brief atonic and myoclonic seizures. When atypical absences lasted for a long time, patients manifested NCSE. Polytherapy might be related to the occurrence of minor seizures and NCSE, because all patients were treated with polytherapy at their appearance, and simplification of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy seemed to be effective. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that this NCSE is a type of atypical absence status which is an age-dependent, transient, electroclinical condition. The mechanism of occurrence of these minor seizures might be related to secondary bilateral synchrony.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/102. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus in a child with congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome.

    A 9-year-old male with congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome is described. He had pseudobulbar palsy, mental retardation, and intractable epilepsy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of the brain demonstrated bilateral perisylvian malformations and a diffuse pachygyric appearance. At 8 years of age, he had episodes of excessive drooling, fluctuating impairment of consciousness, unsteady sitting, and frequent head drop that lasted several days. The electroencephalogram demonstrated continuous diffuse slow spike and waves. These findings suggested atypical absence status epilepticus. Intravenous administration of diazepam resulted in transient improvement of clinical and electroencephalographic findings. status epilepticus recurred within several minutes after diazepam administration. Although no patient has been reported to have a history of status epilepticus among those affected by this syndrome, it seems that atypical absence status can occur more frequently than expected, as seen in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. After recognition and confirmation of nonconvulsive status epilepticus, immediate treatment must be attempted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/102. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus in eyelid myoclonia with absences--evidence of provocation unrelated to photosensitivity.

    A 10-year old girl with eyelid myoclonia with absences (EMA) in whom nonconvulsive status epilepticus developed shortly after awakening is described. A video-polygraphic recording during the status showed the characteristic eye-closure provocation of eyelid myoclonia with upward deviation of the eyeballs and brief absences. Ictal EEG showed generalized polyspikes concomitant with eyelid myoclonia, while absences were accompanied by 3.5 Hz polyspike-wave complexes on EEG. This condition occurred even in total darkness as well as even after seizures precipitated by bright sunlight had been eliminated by medication. The present case suggests that the eye closure mechanism could be a more potent precipitating factor than photosensitivity in the pathophysiology of EMA.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/102. Tiagabine-induced absence status in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Several medications such as baclofen, amitriptyline and even antiepileptic drugs such as carbamazepine or vigabatrin are known to induce absence status epilepticus in patients with generalized epilepsies. Tiagabine (TGB) is effective in patients with focal epilepsies. However, TGB has also been reported to induce non-convulsive status epilepticus in several patients with focal epilepsies and in one patient with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In animal models of generalized epilepsy, TGB induces absence status with 3-5 Hz spike-wave complexes. We describe a 32-year-old patient with absence epilepsy and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures since 11 years of age, who developed her first absence status epilepticus while treated with 45 mg of TGB daily. Administration of lorazepam and immediate reduction in TGB dosage was followed by complete clinical and electroencephalographic remission. This case demonstrates that TGB can induce typical absence status epilepticus in a patient with primary generalized epilepsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/102. Myoclonic status epilepticus following high-dosage lamotrigine therapy.

    An 8-year-old girl with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome showed a partial reduction in seizure frequency when lamotrigine (LTG), 15 mg/kg per day, was added to clobazam (CLB) and vigabatrin (VGB). An increase in LTG dosage to 20 mg/kg per day produced no further improvement and was followed by myoclonic status epilepticus. The condition developed insidiously and ultimately became stable. Video-EEG polygraphy and jerk-locked back-averaged EEG demonstrated continuous myoclonus of cortical origin. Discontinuation of LTG resulted in rapid disappearance of clinical and electrophysiological manifestations of myoclonic status epilepticus. No episodes of myoclonus occurred in the subsequent 2 years, during which CLB and VGB were kept unchanged. The striking response to drug discontinuation suggests that LTG may have played a role in the precipitation of status, possibly within the context of paradoxical intoxication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0076140450143983
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/102. Reversible changes in echo planar perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MRI in status epilepticus.

    perfusion imaging (PI) demonstrated increased perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) showed high signal limited to the left temporoparietal cortex in a 68-year-old man with nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The EEG showed a slow delta-wave focus. The patient recovered and PI, DWI and EEG changes completely resolved.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/102. Status-like recurrent pilomotor seizures: case report and review of the literature.

    A diabetic 66 year old man who presented with pilomotor seizures in his right hemibody is described. The seizures recurred with an increasing frequency, leading to a status-like condition associated with Korsakoff's syndrome. An EEG was performed and several electroclinical seizures were recorded. brain MRI was negative. The patient, who was treated with carbamazepine, became seizure free after 1 week. memory and behaviour gradually returned to normal within 3 weeks. There was no further neurological episode during an 8 year follow up. Hyperosmolar, non-ketotic hyperglycaemia was considered to be the cause of the seizures. The pathophysiology of pilomotor seizures is discussed and the literature on the subject reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0076140450143983
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/102. Preservation of the brainstem auditory evoked potential in non-convulsive status epilepticus.

    Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) were recorded from a patient simultaneously experiencing non-convulsive generalized status epilepticus (NGSE). Waves I, III and V were normal but all subsequent waves were absent. This finding indicates that structures within the brainstem adjacent to the generators for the BAEP are likely not affected by NGSE and also illustrates the resilient nature of the BAEP. This is the first report of the recording of an evoked potential during a naturally occurring generalized seizure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/102. Design of a prospective neonatal cohort study of homozygous and double heterozygous factor v Leiden and factor II G20210A.

    BACKGROUND: factor v Leiden (FVL) and Factor II (FII) G20210A represent common risk factors for thromboembolic (TE) events. In children, both venous and arterial TE-events have been associated with the presence of FVL and FII G20210A. In most heterozygous children with TE-events other prothrombotic factors can usually be identified. case reports of children with homozygous FVL, including 3 patients described here, suggest that this genotype may convey a particulary high risk. However, prospective data about the type and frequency of TE-events in such children are lacking. STUDY DESIGN: We have initiated a prospective neonatal cohort study for the homozygous and double heterozygous genotypes for FVL and FII G20210A. The probands and the heterozygous controls are identified by neonatal screening that involves > 98% of the children born in berlin and are followed up in a special out-patient clinic to document details of the clinical history, developmental parameters and the occurrence of TE-events. CONCLUSIONS: This study will provide controlled and unbiased information about the clinical significance of the homozygous and double heterozygous genotypes of these mutations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0076140450143983
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Status Epilepticus'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.