Cases reported "Stomach Diseases"

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1/22. Pleural incarceration of the gastric graft after trans-hiatal esophagectomy.

    We report on a 73-year-old man who underwent a transhiatal esophagectomy for a T2N1M0 adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and developed an incarcerated herniation of the gastric graft through a defect in the right mediastinal pleura. The patient experienced delayed gastric emptying postoperatively, which was initially suggested by barium swallow. The gastric herniation was unidentified by early postoperative swallowing studies and endoscopies. After diagnosis by a later computed tomographic scan and barium study, the herniation was reduced by incising the mediastinal pleura from the diaphragm to the apex of the chest and by plication of the stomach longitudinally in order to reduce its intrathoracic diameter.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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2/22. Xanthelasma of esophagus and stomach.

    Gastric xanthelasma, a benign condition, has been reported before; there has been no documentation of xanthelasma of the esophagus. We report a patient with xanthelasma of the stomach and esophagus.
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ranking = 6
keywords = esophagus
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3/22. Bilevel nasal positive airway pressure and ballooning of the stomach.

    We describe a case of severe gastric insufflation in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who was receiving bilevel nasal positive airway pressure (BNPAP) ventilation (BiPAP; Respironics; Murrysville, PA). The injection of inspiratory flow into the esophagus, aerophagia, and air trapping below the gastroesophageal junction after a meal are probably the major causes. We suggest that BNPAP ventilation can be a cause of serious gastric insufflation in a patient who lies supine, especially after a meal, and attention should be paid to avoiding this complication by having the patient sit up for about half an hour after a meal.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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4/22. Gastric pneumatosis in neonates: revisited.

    Pneumatosis intestinalis, found commonly in neonatal necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), can occur in any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the oesophagus to the rectum. Gastric pneumatosis, defined as air within the wall of the stomach, however, is an extremely rare sign during infancy and is usually secondary to gastric outlet obstruction. The clinical course and outcome of a neonate with gastric pneumatosis associated with NEC is reported along with a brief review of the literature. The findings illustrate that gastric pneumatosis can be the presenting feature of fulminant NEC and may indicate widespread, severe gastrointestinal insult.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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5/22. Aggressive inflammatory pseudotumor of the abdomen 9 years after therapy for wilms tumor. A complication, coincidence, or association?

    BACKGROUND. Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a benign lesion that occurs in various organs and tissues. It is usually sharply demarcated from the surrounding tissue and surgery is considered to be the best treatment. methods. This article discusses a 15-year-old boy with an aggressive IPT of the abdomen occurring 9 years after therapy for wilms tumor. RESULTS. IPT widely involved the esophagus, stomach, and liver, producing severe dysphagia. Histologically, it showed classic features of IPT and, also, areas of metaplastic bone, a new feature recently described in the same lesion of the kidney. It mimicked malignant tumor clinically and led to extensive surgery, but early follow-up has shown no recurrence. CONCLUSION. Although many complications of surgery and chemotherapy are well known, the authors believe that it is unlikely to be the cause of IPT in the case presented. Therefore, the possibility of coincidence or association of wilms tumor and IPT remains open.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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6/22. A case report of localized gastric amyloidosis.

    AIM: To elucidate the clinical and laboratory features of localized gastric amyloidosis via a rare report along with a review of related literatures. methods: The clinical manifestations, laboratory results and surgical treatment of a female patient with localized gastric amyloidosis in our hospital were summarized. The relevant literatures were reviewed on the etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of this disease. RESULTS: The patient was lack of specific clinical manifestations and positive laboratory results. Prior to the treatment, she was suspected to be of malignization from gastric ulcer by both gastroscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography, which was denied by the gastric biopsy. The patient was treated with subtotal gastrectomy and clearance of perigastric lymph nodes. The postoperative pathological diagnosis determined the lesion to be the deposition of amyloid materials in the gastric mucosa, submucosa and blood vessel walls with intestinal metaplasia and atrophy of the gastric glands, in which no malignant tumor was found. congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the AA type of amyloid in this case. Multiple biopsies from esophagus, remnant stomach, duodenum, colon and bone marrow in the follow-up survey showed no amyloidal deposition in these tissues and organs. Up to the present, no signs of recurrence have been found in this patient. CONCLUSION: Localized gastric amyloidosis, being rare in incidence, should be considered in the differentiation of gastric tumors, in which biopsy is the only means to confirm the diagnosis. Currently, surgical resection of pathological tissue and circumambient lymph nodes may be a preferable therapeutic strategy for the localized amyloidosis to prevent possible complications. Although with a benign prognosis, gastric amyloidosis possesses a recurrent tendency as suggested by the literatures.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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7/22. Gastroesophageal intussusception: a new cause of acute esophageal obstruction in children.

    Gastrointestinal intussusception with obstruction is common in the small bowel and colon; however, such a process is not known to cause esophageal obstruction. Recent experience with gastroesophageal intussusception permits discussion of diagnosis and consideration of treatment options. A 3-year-old child presented with acute esophageal obstruction. physical examination was significant for epigastric tenderness and excessive salivation. Chest x-ray showed a posterior mediastinal fullness. Esophagram documented a smooth crescent-filling defect, which caused obstruction of the esophagus at the level of the carina with proximal esophageal dilatation. Chest computed tomography of the thorax showed a soft tissue mass of the distal esophagus. esophagoscopy confirmed occlusion of the midesophagus with the mucosa intact. A right thoracotomy permitted visualization of dilated proximal esophagus and a palpation of an intraluminal mass in the distal esophagus. Mobilization of the distal esophagus and gentle manual pressure cleared the obstruction to a point below the diaphragm. After a normal intraoperative esophagram, final treatment consisted of a longitudinal esophagomyotomy. The child recovered without complication and continues without recurrence for 18 months. This is the first report of gastroesophageal intussusception in children. Management by thoracotomy, manual reduction, and esophageal myotomy reestablished intestinal continuity and appears to eliminate recurrence; fundoplication or gastropexy may be alternative options. Preoperative recognition of gastroesophageal intussusception may allow nonoperative reduction or treatment by minimally invasive surgery.
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ranking = 6
keywords = esophagus
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8/22. Collagenous gastritis in a Korean child: a case report.

    Collagenous gastritis, a counterpart of collagenous colitis, is an extremely rare disorder. The first case of collagenous gastritis in a Korean boy in his pre-teens who had been receiving treatment for refractory iron deficiency anemia has been reported. The patient had been suffering from intermittent abdominal pain, recurrent blood-tinged vomiting and poor oral intake. The gastric endoscopy revealed diffuse cobblestone appearance of the mucosa with easy touch bleeding throughout the stomach but no abnormalities in the esophagus, duodenum, and colon. Pathologic examination of the gastric biopsies from the antrum, body and cardia showed a subepithelial collagen deposition with entrapped dilated capillaries, moderate infiltrates of lympho-plasma cells and eosinophils of the lamina propria, and marked hypertrophy of the muscularis mucosa. The collagen deposition appeared as discontinuous bands with focally irregular extension into the deeper part of the antral mucosa. It measured up to 150 microm. helicobacter pylori infection was not detected. The biopsies from the duodenum, esophagus and colon revealed no pathologic abnormalities.
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ranking = 2
keywords = esophagus
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9/22. Menetrier's disease. A trivalent gastropathy.

    Current conceptions of Menetrier's disease only obliquely resemble those originally described. Bona-fide cases are so uncommon that, of 125 cases diagnosed as Menetier's disease, hypertrophic gastritis, or protein-losing gastropathy treated at the massachusetts General Hospital during the 26-year period of 1962-1987, only six cases merited an unequivocal anatomic diagnosis. Two other cases previously described proved on review to be nondiagnostic in one instance and campylobacter pylori gastritis in the other. Because abnormalities in the secretion of gastric acid and in the loss of protein from the stomach may coexist, a representation of each case in semiquantitative terms can be described on triaxial coordinates. Three patients had a hypercoagulable state, one in association with gastric carcinoma. One other case of gastric carcinoma and one of esophageal carcinoma coexistant with Menetrier's disease were identified. Administration of subcutaneous heparin during the perioperative period to patients with Menetrier's disease is appropriate regardless of whether or not hypercoagulation or carcinoma is manifest. If treatment with anticholinergic drugs and inhibitors of gastric acid secretion fails, total gastrectomy is the best solution, because it stops protein loss, eliminates hyperchlorhydria, prevents development of gastric carcinoma, and permits anastomotic reconstruction between normal esophagus and normal small bowel.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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10/22. Nonreflux complications of hiatal hernia.

    patients with massive incarcerated hiatal hernia and no appreciable esophagitis present with a distinctly different clinical picture from those with hiatal hernia and reflux peptic esophagitis. In a recent review, 17 patients were encountered with this problem. The patients were often elderly and presented with the following grave complications: upper gastrointestinal obstruction; upper gastrointestinal bleeding, both acute and chronic, from gastric ulcerations; and perforated gastric ulcerations. In these patients, the surgical approach is better accomplished through the abdominal route. These patients should be distinguished from those with a shortened esophagus resulting from chronic reflux peptic esophagitis who often require thoracotomy for surgical correction.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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