Cases reported "Stomach Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/150. Molecular relationships of helicobacter pylori strains in a family with gastroduodenal disease.

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies have examined the genetic relationships of helicobacter pylori strains affecting family members. Our aim was to do so. methods: We characterized H. pylori isolates obtained from members of a single family presenting with various gastroduodenal diseases to examine H. pylori bacterial genetic similarity. Endoscopic evaluation with gastric mapping was performed on each individual to establish clinical and histological disease. Genomic dna extracted from each H. pylori isolate was used to generate dna fingerprints for each strain by REP-PCR. vacA genotypes and cagA presence were established by PCR. RESULTS: gastrointestinal diseases among the five members of this family included gastric adenocarcinoma in a 52-yr-old man (index patient), gastric MALT-lymphoma in the 73-yr-old mother; intestinal metaplasia (IV) and atrophic gastritis in the 48-yr-old brother; intestinal metaplasia (I-III) in the 47-yr-old brother, and a duodenal ulcer scar in the 42-yr-old sister. REP-PCR dna fingerprints of H. pylori isolates from the index patient, his mother, and both of his brothers were identical or highly similar. By contrast, the H. pylori dna fingerprint from the sister was markedly different from the H. pylori dna fingerprints from the other family members. All isolates had the genotype cagA-positive and vacA slb/ml mosaic genotype. CONCLUSIONS: The dna fingerprints of H. pylori strains obtained from members of this family with malignancy or premalignant histological disease were identical or highly similar and markedly different from the H. pylori dna fingerprint from the sibling with duodenal ulcer disease. All H. pylori isolates within the family possessed genetic markers of enhanced virulence (presence of the cagA gene and vacA sl/ml mosaicism). In addition to host genetics and environmental factors, these findings suggest that infection with genetically similar H. pylori strains is a significant factor in determining the clinical outcome of an infection with H. pylori.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/150. Clinical symptoms, hormone profiles, treatment, and prognosis in patients with gastric carcinoids.

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 gastric carcinoids are associated with hypergastrinaemia and chronic atrophic gastritis, type 2 occur in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 combined with zollinger-ellison syndrome, and type 3 lack any relation to hypergastrinaemia. Type 1 tumours are usually benign whereas type 3 are highly malignant. AIMS: To identify possible tumour markers in patients with gastric carcinoids. patients/METHOD: Nine patients with type 1, one with type 2, and five with type 3 were evaluated with regard to symptoms, hormone profile, and prognosis. RESULTS: Plasma chromogranin a was increased in all patients but was higher (p < 0.01) in those with type 3 than those with type 1 carcinoids. All patients with type 3 carcinoids died from metastatic disease, but none of the type 1 patients died as a result of their tumours. One type 1 patient with a solitary liver metastasis received interferon alpha and octreotide treatment. Nine months later, the metastasis was no longer detectable. She is still alive eight years after diagnosis, without recurrent disease. This represents the only reported case of foregut carcinoid with an unresectable liver metastasis that seems to be have been cured by biotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma chromogranin a appears to be a valuable tumour marker for all types of gastric carcinoid. Combination therapy with interferon alpha and octreotide may be beneficial in patients with metastasising type 1 gastric carcinoids.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/150. Simultaneous MALT-type lymphoma and early adenocarcinoma of the stomach associated with helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    We report about two cases of combined gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma with one of them representing a case of early gastric high grade B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) with co-existing early gastric adenocarcinoma. In contrast to most previously reported similar cases, in both of our cases the definitive diagnosis of gastric lymphoma and carcinoma was obtained preoperatively. This, however, seems to be in future times an essential prerequisite for employing minimal invasive methods such as eradication therapy in the case of diagnosed early lymphoma and endoscopic treatment for early gastric carcinomas. These methods have been proven to be an effective and beneficial alternative treatment especially with regard to the life quality of the patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/150. Natural killer-like T-cell lymphoma of the stomach.

    We report the case of a 69-year-old white woman who developed a natural killer (NK)-like T-cell lymphoma involving primarily the stomach. The tumour consisted of large and pleomorphic lymphocytes infiltrating the gastric mucosa. immunohistochemistry performed on paraffin sections showed the neoplastic cells to be CD3 , CD5-, CD8-, CD43 , CD45RO , and CD57 . In addition, these cells also expressed HLA-DR, granzyme B, and, to a lesser extent, the CD30 activation marker. No pathologic features suggesting helicobacter pylori, Epstein-Barr virus infection, or lymphocytic gastritis were found within adjacent normal mucosa. The patient had no previous history of coeliac disease, and her serology for H. pylori was negative. Since lymphomas are usually considered the neoplastic counterpart of normal lymphocytic subsets, it is possible that in this case the tumour cells originate from a distinct cytotoxic T-cell population normally present within the gastric mucosa. The pathogenesis of this highly unusual neoplasm, however, remains a mystery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/150. Expression of vesicular monoamine transporters in endocrine hyperplasia and endocrine tumors of the oxyntic stomach.

    BACKGROUND: Gastric enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells selectively express the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) VMAT2, and enterochromaffin (EC) cells the VMAT1 isoform. Aims: We investigated whether VMAT isoform selection indicates the origin of endocrine hyperplasia and neoplasia from oxyntic ECL or EC cells and may be of prognostic significance in different types of gastric carcinoids. methods: Tissue from patients with chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), Zollinger-Ellison-syndrome (ZES), gastric carcinoids and neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) was investigated by immunohistology and in situ hybridization. RESULTS: endocrine cells forming diffuse, linear, and micronodular hyperplasia in CAG and ZES, as well as oxyntic microcarcinoids expressed both VMAT2 and chromogranin a (CgA) but neither VMAT1 nor serotonin. In five of six sporadic carcinoids VMAT2 and CgA but not VMAT1 were detected. One carcinoid was copositive for VMAT1 and serotonin but negative for VMAT2. Electron microscopy confirmed the VMAT2-positive tumors as ECLoma and the VMAT1-immunoreactive carcinoid as EComa. CONCLUSIONS: VMAT2 and VMAT1 are reliable markers for differentiation of gastric endocrine hyperplasia and neoplasia from ECL and EC cells, respectively. The significance of VMAT2 and VMAT1 as prognostic markers lies in the relatively poor prognosis for EComa compared to ECLoma, characterized by VMAT2 positivity. The absence of both VMAT2 and VMAT1 in NEC may indicate poor prognosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/150. Primary gastric plasmacytoma: a rare cause of hypertrophic gastritis in an adolescent.

    BACKGROUND: This report describes a 16-year-old patient with gastric rugal hypertrophy caused by a primary gastric plasmacytoma. She had a 3-month history of nausea and burning abdominal pain. Radiographic studies showed giant rugal hypertrophy. Superficial endoscopic gastric biopsies showed mild inflammation with plasma cells of polyclonal origin in the mucosa. When symptoms persisted, she underwent laparoscopic full-thickness gastric biopsy. There was monoclonal plasma cell infiltration histologically diagnostic of plasmacytoma and inconsistent with helicobacter pylori-associated mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. There was no evidence for involvement of the bone marrow or regional lymph nodes. The tumor did not respond to radiotherapy, necessitating total gastrectomy. methods: blood samples were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-6 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gastric biopsy and gastrectomy specimens were subjected to immunophenotyping for kappa and lambda light chains, CD45, CD20, and LN1 and to polymerase chain reaction analysis for herpes virus HHV8. RESULTS: There was no elevation in circulating IL-6 levels, militating against a pathogenesis akin to that of Castleman's disease. There was no evidence for infection with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus HHV8, which has recently been found in patients with multiple myeloma. CONCLUSIONS: This diagnosis and the characteristics of the tumor are very unusual, if not unique, for a patient of this age. The diagnostic evaluation of this patient also demonstrates the importance of deep endoscopic or full-thickness biopsies in some children with hypertrophic gastritis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/150. gastric mucosa as an additional extrahepatic localization of hepatitis c virus: viral detection in gastric low-grade lymphoma associated with autoimmune disease and in chronic gastritis.

    The hepatitis c virus (HCV) has been linked to B-cell lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity, and has been localized in several tissues. The clinical observation of an HCV-infected patient with sjogren's syndrome (SS) and helicobacter pylori (HP) positive gastric low-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), which did not regress after HP eradication, led us to investigate the possible localization of HVC in the gastric microenvironment. HCV genome and antigens were searched in gastric biopsy specimens from the previously mentioned case, as well as from 9 additional HCV-infected patients (8 with chronic gastritis and 1 with gastric low-grade B-cell NHL). HCV-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry procedures were used. The gastric B-cell NHL from the patient with SS was characterized by molecular analyses of B-cell clonality. HCV rna was detected in both the gastric low-grade B-cell NHL and in 3 out of 6 gastric samples from the remaining cases. HCV antigens were detected in the residual glandular cells within the gastric B-cell NHL lesions, in glandular cells from 2 of the 3 additional gastric lesions that were HCV positive by PCR, and in 1 additional chronic gastritis sample in which HCV-rna studies could not be performed. By molecular analyses, of immunoglobulin genes, the B-cell NHL from the patient with SS was confirmed to be a primary gastric lymphoma, subjected to ongoing antigenic stimulation and showing a significant similarity with rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-HCV- antibody sequences. Our results show that HCV can localize in the gastric mucosa.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/150. Superficial gastric carcinoma developed on localized hypertrophic lymphocytic gastritis: a variant of localized Menetrier's disease?

    Menetrier's disease is a rare premalignant condition that usually involves the entire stomach. Only few cases of localized disease have been reported, rarely with cancer. Lymphocytic gastritis is a newly described entity that may share a common pathogenesis with Menetrier's disease. The authors report the case of a 62 year old woman with known liver cirrhosis in whom endoscopic examination of the stomach showed an antral tumor. Examination of the surgical specimen showed a superficial gastric adenocarcinoma developed on an hypertrophic gastropathy with both Menetrier's disease and lymphocytic gastritis features. This observation strengthens the hypothesis of a common mechanism between Menetrier's disease and lymphocytic gastritis, which may be part of the same disease spectrum. This disease could also correspond to the "hypertrophic lymphocytic gastritis" recently described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/150. Relationship between pernicious anaemia and gastric neuroendocrine cell disorders.

    The incidence of gastric carcinoid tumours is increasing. This rise is probably due to the number of gastroscopies and improved histological techniques. The majority (65%) of these gastric tumours is associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and pernicious anaemia. In this article two patients are presented, one with pernicious anaemia and gastric neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia and one with pernicious anaemia and multiple gastric carcinoids. These neuroendocrine cell disorders have a relatively favourable prognosis. Therefore, a wait-and-see policy was preferred. The pathogenesis, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of these different neuroendocrine cell manifestations are discussed. We recommend performing a gastroscopy at the time of diagnosis for young patients with pernicious anaemia, and whenever abdominal problems, unexplained weight loss or aggravation of the anaemia arise.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/150. Pernicious anemia, gastric carcinoid, and autoimmune thrombocytopenia in a young woman.

    The association between gastric carcinoid tumors and pernicious anemia is well recognized. Such tumors occur in the presence of achlorhydria, chronic atrophic gastritis, hypergastrinemia, and enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia. In this case report, a 29-year-old woman with pernicious anemia and autoimmune thrombocytopenia who developed gastric carcinoid tumors of the gastric body is described. This is the second description of pernicious anemia associated with autoimmune thrombocytopenia. This association in a young woman together with the therapeutic options and decisions that were taken in the treatment of the patient are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Stomach Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.