Cases reported "Stomach Neoplasms"

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21/150. Regression of primary high-grade gastric B-cell lymphoma following helicobacter pylori eradication.

    The causative association between helicobacter pylori and gastric mucosal inflammation is well established. The inflammatory process leads to the acquisition of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) by the stomach. Evidence links H. pylori gastritis with the development of low-grade primary gastric lymphoma with a phenotype specific for lymphoma of MALT type. It is now accepted that primary low-grade MALT lymphomas regress with H. pylori eradication therapy. However, the response of primary, diffuse, large-cell gastric lymphoma to H. pylori eradication therapy is still not established. We report a case of a primary high-grade gastric lymphoma regressing after H. pylori eradication therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
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22/150. Collagenous gastritis: a long-term follow-up with the development of endocrine cell hyperplasia, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial changes indeterminate for dysplasia.

    This report reviews the literature pertaining to collagenous gastritis and describes the clinicopathologic evolution of this disease in a patient during a 12-year period. We examined 109 biopsy specimens of gastric mucosa from 19 different endoscopic procedures for the severity and distribution of collagenous gastritis in a single patient. Assessments were undertaken for the presence of endocrine and gastrin cell hyperplasias and dysplastic epithelial changes. Relative to biopsy specimens from age- and sex-matched control subjects, the patient's biopsy specimens showed a significantly lower number of antral gastrin cells, along with a significant corpus endocrine cell hyperplasia, suggesting an increased risk of endocrine neoplasia. Gastric corpus biopsy specimens revealed an active, chronic gastritis, subepithelial collagen deposition, smooth muscle hyperplasia, and mild to moderate glandular atrophy. Additional findings of intestinal metaplasia and reactive epithelial changes indeterminate for dysplasia raise concerns about the potential for adenocarcinoma.
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ranking = 7
keywords = gastritis
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23/150. diagnosis of a gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma by endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biopsies in a patient with a parotid gland localization.

    We report the case of a 32-year-old man with a low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the parotid gland associated with Sjogren syndrome. He underwent an upper endoscopy as part of the screening of a gastric localization which showed a diffuse non-specific gastritis. However, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) evidenced a focal wall thickening of the vertical portion of the smaller curvature. EUS-guided biopsies of this area disclosed a MALT lymphoma, whereas biopsies under endoscopy concluded to mild chronic gastritis. The search for helicobacter pylori infection remained negative. Four months after treatment with anti-CD20 antibodies, EUS showed a diminution of the abnormal thickening of the second layer. Regression was confirmed histologically on new EUS-guided biopsies. MALT lymphoma is usually considered a localized disease; however, dissemination is probably more frequent than initially believed. Our case reflects the importance of a systematic screening for a gastric localization in patients with MALT lymphoma of the salivary glands. In this situation, association to autoimmune disease such as Sjogren syndrome is more likely to explain the gastric location than infection with H. pylori. Endoscopic ultrasonography has a major impact for the staging of gastric MALT lymphoma, but may also help diagnose focal infiltration by the disease.
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ranking = 2
keywords = gastritis
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24/150. Gastric adenocarcinoma associated with granulomatous gastritis. Case report and review of the literature.

    AIMS: We describe the fourth reported case of granulomatous gastritis associated with gastric adenocarcinoma, with a review of the literature and considerations about the prognostic implications of this association. RESULTS: A 48-year-old woman who had been suffering from gastritis for ten years was admitted to our institute for increasing left epigastric pain associated with vomiting. After an endoscopic biopsy had revealed an ulcerated signet ring cell carcinoma, the patient was submitted to subtotal gastrectomy with regional lymph node dissection. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed a superficial signet ring cell carcinoma (early cancer) associated with multiple granulomas. The granulomas, which were observed within the mucosa and the submucosa at the periphery of the carcinoma, were composed of CD68-positive, CD15-negative epithelioid and giant cells of the Langhans type, confirming their true histiocytic nature, and were also extensively found within the dissected lymph nodes. Since no ocular, skin, pulmonary or other gastrointestinal lesions were found and the granulomas were negative for acid-fast and fungal stain, a diagnosis of granulomatous gastritis was made. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge this is the fourth example of gastric adenocarcinoma and granulomatous gastritis. These cases suggest an association between granulomatous gastritis and early gastric cancer.
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ranking = 9
keywords = gastritis
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25/150. The natural history of a gastric low grade B cell MALT lymphoma followed during 11 years without treatment.

    Low grade B cell mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the stomach is usually an indolent tumour that remains localised for a long time before dissemination occurs. MALT appears in the stomach in response to infection by helicobacter pylori, which is present in 80-90% of cases. The pathogenesis of the evolution from chronic gastritis to malignant lymphoma has not yet been fully explained and the exact role of H pylori in the pathogenesis and progression of gastric lymphoma remains unclear. This report describes the case of a 72 year old woman with a low grade B cell MALT lymphoma localised in the gastric fundus, who refused to be treated for eradication of H pylori. The histological diagnosis of B cell MALT lymphoma was supported by both immunohistochemical and molecular genetic analysis. After 11 years of follow up, this MALT lymphoma remained indolent, without local progression or blastic transformation, and the H pylori infection was still persistent, even though the density of bacteria had decreased drastically. Interestingly, two different clonal immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements were found in two series of biopsies performed with an interval of 11 years. This case report supports the following notions: (1) H pylori associated gastritis is a risk factor for gastric MALT lymphoma, but might not be sufficient by itself for the progression of the disease, and (2) in the evolution of MALT lymphomas, different cell clones characterised by different Ig rearrangements may emerge.
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ranking = 2
keywords = gastritis
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26/150. A unique early gastric tubular adenocarcinoma arising from a pre-existent carcinoid tumor in a patient with a more than 20-year history of type A gastritis: an immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study.

    A unique early gastric tubular adenocarcinoma developed from a pre-existent carcinoid tumor in a patient with a more than 20-year history of type A gastritis, multiple endocrine cell micronests, hypergastrinemia, and a high level of serum antiparietal cell autoantibody. The patient was a 60-year-old Japanese man. The background gastric mucosa around the tumor showed marked atrophy with intestinal metaplasia, in which endocrine cell micronests were frequently observed, and was consistent with type A gastritis. The mass was composed of both adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor. The adenocarcinoma was restricted to the lamina mucosa and submucosal area, and constituted a minor component of the tumor mass. The carcinoid tumor was the dominant constituent of the tumor, that invaded continuously the subserosa and muscularis propria. Based on this examination together with the detailed immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies, the adenocarcinoma was presumed to have developed from the pre-existent carcinoid tumor. Ultrastructurally there were no amphicrine cells in the tumor, containing both endocrine granules and mucin droplets.
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ranking = 6
keywords = gastritis
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27/150. Heterotopic pancreas in gastric antrum with macroscopic appearance of gastric polyp.

    Heterotopic pancreas is a relatively rare clinical diagnosis, not commonly involved in differential diagnostic considerations of GI symptoms. The authors report a case of heterotopic pancreas discovered endoscopically in the gastric antrum. A 60-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain. The patient took alendronate for osteoporosis. The endoscopic examination revealed helicobacter pylori positive antral atrophic gastropathy and a well delineated hemispherical polyp, 8 mm in diameter, in the antrum of the stomach. histology showed antral gastritis and the presence of heterotopic pancreas. After dietary measures and Helicobacter eradication, the patient was relieved of symptoms. According to the authors' opinion, the finding of heterotopic pancreas did not necessitate intervention, and was an incidental finding. The authors discuss the significance of heterotopic pancreas with the conclusion that the resection of the lesion is indicated only if consistent symptoms are present. Fig. 3, Ref. 28.)
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ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
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28/150. Combined adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in atrophic gastritis.

    The development of adenocarcinoma or carcinoid tumors in atrophic gastritis is widely documented. We report the simultaneous occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma and carcinoid (composite tumor) in atrophic gastritis, a finding reported only twice before in the literature. This 52-yr-old man with rectal bleeding, epigastric pain, and iron deficiency anemia was noted to have multiple polypoid masses on upper endoscopy. biopsy revealed features of both adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in a background of atrophic gastritis, leading to a total gastrectomy, lymph node dissection, and liver biopsy. The gastrectomy specimen was characterized by a 6 cm pedunculated polyp and multiple sessile nodular masses between 0.4 and 2.5 cm in the background of a granular mucosa. On microscopic examination, the large polypoid mass corresponded to a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, intestinal type, infiltrating the wall. The smaller nodules were composed of carcinoid tumors, restricted to the mucosa, or infiltrating the gastric wall. carcinoid tumor was also seen in the large polypoid mass closely intermingled with adenocarcinoma.The carcinoid tumor metastasized to the liver. lymph nodes showed both adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor. The gastric mucosa was characterized by atrophic gastritis with intestinal metaplasia, neuroendocrine hyperplasia, and microcarcinoids. The adenocarcinoma stained strongly for CK7, CK 20, MIB-1, and focally for chromogranin and synaptophysin. The carcinoid tumor was negative for CK7, CK 20 and MIB-1, and was positive for chromogranin and synaptophysin. Overexpression of p53 was noted only in the adenocarcinoma. Electron microscopy revealed neurosecretory granules in the carcinoid characteristic of a neuroendocrine tumor. Composite tumor can occur in the setting of atrophic gastritis. The findings in this patient reinforce the concept that the epithelial and neuroendocrine cells of the gastrointestinal tract both result from multidirectional differentiation of a primitive cell.
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ranking = 9
keywords = gastritis
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29/150. adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction: could the characteristics of adjacent intestinal metaplasia help in the understanding of biopathogenesis?

    We report a case of early adenocarcinoma arising in foci of intestinal metaplasia (IM) at a normal-appearing gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). The tumor infiltrated the submucosa without nodal involvement (T1N0). Non-neoplastic mucosa adjacent to neoplasia had foci of incomplete IM with a band-like CK20 positivity of the surface epithelium and a diffuse CK7 staining of both superficial and deep glands. There were histological features of reflux esophagitis as well as chronic non-atrophic, helicobacter pylori-related pangastritis, without IM, at the extensively assessed gastric mucosa. In this case, the CK7/20 pattern of IM adjacent to neoplasia, the demonstration of reflux esophagitis, and the absence of IM in the stomach favor the theory that the pathogenesis of IM and associated adenocarcinoma of the GEJ is related to gastroesophageal reflux rather than H. pylori infection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
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30/150. A case of multicentric gastric carcinoids without hypergastrinemia.

    We have encountered an unusual case of gastric carcinoid tumors. Gastroscopic examination of a 71-year-old male patient showed eight smooth protrusions at the greater curvature of the gastric body, some of which had central depressions. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated that the largest tumor (2.6 cm in diameter) was located in the submucosal layer. The patient had a normal serum gastrin level and was negative for antiparietal cell antibody. The patient was also found to have a pituitary tumor, an adenomatous goiter, and bilateral Warthin's tumors of the parotid glands. Histological examination of the resected stomach identified 12 discrete carcinoid tumors. There was no evidence of atrophic gastritis or of endocrine cell micronests. No mutations of the MEN1 gene were found on genomic dna analysis. Despite the multiplicity of carcinoid tumors, we diagnosed type 3 gastric carcinoid in this patient.
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