Cases reported "Stomach Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/16. Chromosome instability in lymphocytes from two patients affected by three sequential primary cancers: the role of fragile sites.

    The chromosomal aberration rate and the expression of fragile sites induced by aphidicolin were evaluated in metaphase chromosomes obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes of two untreated patients with multiple primary cancers. Spontaneous aberrations of chromosome number and structure and chromosome fragility were compared with controls with the use of the same methods. Chromosomal aberration rates and expression frequencies of fragile sites were significantly higher in the patients than in normal control subjects. In the patients, all but one structural chromosome aberration involved at least one fragile site. Our results suggest that fragile sites may be unstable regions of the human genome, which might play an important role in the genetic instability associated with cancer predisposition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = instability
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/16. dna mismatch repair deficiency in curatively resected sextuple primary cancers in different organs: a molecular case report.

    A male patient synchronously or metachronously underwent six curative resections after diagnoses of cancers in the rectum, urinary bladder, stomach, colon, liver and lung. Five cancers, excluding early colon cancer, were analyzed for instability in seven microsatellite markers and in transforming growth factor beta type II receptor, insulin-like growth factor ii receptor and BAX. All analyzed cancers had replication errors and instability in at least one target gene. These results suggest that abnormal dna mismatch repair system plays a major role in the occurrence of multiple primary cancers in this case.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.6191941524624
keywords = microsatellite, instability
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/16. Elongation of (CTG)n repeats in myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene in tumors associated with myotonic dystrophy patients.

    Length of (CTG)n triplet repeats in myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene (DMPK) was estimated in tumors, normal tissues of the same organs, muscles, and leukocytes from three myotonic dystrophy (DM) patients and a non-DM patient. Using cDNA 25 as a probe, a Southern blot analysis of EcoRI- and BglI-digested DNA from these tissues demonstrated the longest expansion of the repeats in the tumors of DM patients. In all tissues from a non-DM patient, the repeat length was confirmed to be stable by PCR analysis. Our data suggest that expanded (CTG)n repeat in tumor tissues may have increased the instability. This study emphasizes the importance of a long-term prospective study on the incidence of tumors in DM to clarify the pathological interrelation between the two entities.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = instability
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/16. Multiple tumors and a novel E2F-4 mutation. A case report.

    Defects in the DNA mismatch-repair are known to cause microsatellite instability (MSI) in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). We previously reported that the E2F-4 gene, which encodes an important transcription factor in cell cycle control, had frequent tumor-specific mutations at the trinucleotide coding region microsatellite (CAG)n in a subset of human sporadic CRC with MSI. We report a 65-year-old man with triple tumors in the abdomen, including colon cancer, stomach cancer, and lipoma of the retroperitoneum, with the analysis of E2F-4 mutation. We report the first case of colon cancer with a homozygous E2F-4 mutation along with a detailed analysis of other cancer related genes as well as a prognosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 106.18458698449
keywords = microsatellite instability, microsatellite, instability
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/16. Synchronous triple cancers at middle and lower esophagus and stomach with different histological features and genetic alterations.

    Synchronous multiple primary malignancies are relatively unusual. We describe a case of synchronous triple cancers located at the middle and lower esophagus and the stomach in a 59-year-old Taiwanese man who presented with progressive dysphagia, epigastralgia, and bodyweight loss in 1 month. Endoscopic and histological features, microsatellite instability status of genomic DNA, and immunohistochemical staining of p53, MUC2, Fhit, c-erbB-2 and E-cadherin of all three cancers were demonstrated. We noted that these three cancers arose from different clones and that p53 mutation, instead of microsatellite instability, may play a major role in the development of multiple primary malignancies in this patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 203.93078566407
keywords = microsatellite instability, microsatellite, instability
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/16. Rapidly growing early gastric cancer with microsatellite instability.

    A 77-year-old man underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy that revealed a small flat elevated lesion in the gastric antrum. Endoscopically, we assessed the tumor as intramucosal cancer or adenoma, and biopsy specimens were diagnosed as showing borderline malignancy. At the second examination, performed 6 months later, the elevated lesion had grown, showing remarkable changes in its appearance, and a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was confirmed pathologically. The patient underwent distal gastrectomy about 8 months after the first examination, and the tumor in the resected specimens showed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma invading through the entire submucosal layer, with metastasis to a regional lymph node. Microsatellite analysis of this early gastric cancer disclosed mutations in all six markers examined, indicating high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H). The tumor also showed frameshift mutations of TGFbetaRII and BAXgenes, as well as hypermethylation of the hMLH1promoter. These results suggest that a deficiency of the mismatch repair system played a critical role in the progression of this cancer.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 509.82696416016
keywords = microsatellite instability, microsatellite, instability
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/16. Allelic loss of 14q32 in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal and ampullary malignancies: mapping of the target region to a 17 cM interval.

    PURPOSE: The genetic basis for gastrointestinal and ampullary carcinomas remains uncertain. This study was performed to pinpoint novel chromosomal region involved in the tumorigenesis of gastrointestinal tract.methods: We screened the allelic status on 16 chromosomal arms in a patient with synchronous ampullary carcinoma and gastric cancer, but who had no family history of familial cancer syndrome. The significance of the shared 14q deletion was examined on clinical cohorts of sporadic gastric (n=12) and ampullary (n=10) carcinoma, respectively. Then, high-density allelotype mapping was performed on 14q32 by using 23 microsatellite markers for the synchronous tumors.RESULTS: The synchronous gastric and ampullary carcinomas had no frameshift mutations in the APC, MSH2, MSH3, and MSH6 genes. Among the microsatellite markers screened, only D14S267 showed identical loss in the synchronous tumors. The same allelic loss was also detected in one of ampullary carcinomas (10%) and two of gastric cancers (16.7%). Fine mapping of 14q determined a minimally deleted region between D14S65 and D14S1010 (17 centiMorgans) for the synchronous tumors.CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates a paradigm using molecular genetic approach in identifying chromosome 14q32 that may harbor a tumor suppressor gene involved in the pathogenesis of a subset of gastrointestinal and ampullary malignancies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8.4383883049249
keywords = microsatellite
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/16. Instability of clonality in gastric lymphoid infiltrates: a study with emphasis on serial biopsies.

    The evolution of low-grade B-cell mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the stomach is a multistage process, reflected in the histologic continuum from helicobacter pylori-chronic gastritis, to low-grade and high-grade lymphoma. Interestingly, in daily gastric biopsy sign-out, the authors observed that some biopsies showed monoclonality on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) even though there were no definite histologic features of malignancy and vice versa. To address the question, the authors studied the endoscopic gastric biopsies at first presentation of 46 patients to examine any clonality differences among various histologic patterns within the spectrum of MALT lymphoma evolution. The gastric biopsies were reviewed histologically and graded according to the Wotherspoon-Isaacson histologic scoring system from grade 0 (normal) to grade 5 (MALT lymphoma). The clonality of cases in each grade was determined by performing nested PCR for immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene rearrangement using FR2/JH and FR3/JH primer sets. The monoclonality rates among different grades were as follows: grade 2, 6.3% (1 of 16); grade 3, 27.3% (3 of 11); grade 4, 83.3% (5 of 6); grade 5, 69.2% (9 of 13). Statistically significant difference of monoclonality rate is demonstrated in histologic grade 4 versus grades 2 and 3, and grade 5 versus grade 2 (P < 0.05, Fisher exact test). The authors went on to examine the progress of disease by following up the clinical status, histologic changes, and clonality fluctuation of these cases. Four of the 8 patients with monoclonality on PCR, but no definite lymphoma at first presentation later progressed to frank MALT lymphoma. Our study shows that, during the progression to MALT lymphoma, there is an instability of clonality. Clonality can fluctuate between polyclonality, oligoclonality, and monoclonality, none of which defines an irreversible stage for progression to MALT lymphoma. Monoclonality is a risk factor for development of MALT lymphoma. Those cases with dense gastric mucosal lymphoid infiltrate (without definite MALT lymphoma) and monoclonality on PCR need to be closely monitored and Helicobacter infection promptly treated if present. In combination with clinicohistologic examination, PCR can serve as a complementary tool in arriving at a definite diagnosis of MALT lymphoma in cases with borderline histologic features.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = instability
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/16. common variable immunodeficiency and malignancy: a report of two cases and possible explanation for the association.

    Two patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and malignant tumours are reported. The first patient developed myelogenous leukaemia soon after the myelodysplastic syndrome has been diagnosed. The undifferentiated gastric lymphoma found in the second patient suggests that an increased risk of gastrointestinal malignancies in CVID could partly be due to lymphomas. We hypothesize that the tissue- or site-specific risk of lymphomas and gastrointestinal cancer can be explained by an increased chromosomal or genomic instability with a higher mutation rate and genomic disorganization, and that this instability could be related to viral carcinogenesis. The primary immunodeficiency per se may not be responsible for the cancer susceptibility in CVID patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = instability
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/16. Malformation syndrome with t(2;22) in a cancer family with chromosome instability.

    A de novo unbalanced t(2;22)(q37;q11.2) [corrected], resulting in the deletion of the 22pter-q11 and 2q37-qter regions, was observed in a 12-year-old girl born with a congenital malformation syndrome and later displaying signs of neurologic impairment. Some of the clinical signs observed appear to overlap those found in subjects monosomic in the 22q11 region affected by the digeorge syndrome. The chromosomal rearrangement observed may be related to a familial cytogenetic instability that also gives rise to sustained cancer predisposition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = instability
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Stomach Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.