Cases reported "Stomach Ulcer"

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1/7. Acute oral selenium intoxication with ten times the lethal dose resulting in deep gastric ulcer.

    A 48-year-old woman presented after taking 2000 mg of selenium dioxide, corresponding to 10 times the experimental lethal dose in animals. She presented with mildly altered consciousness and hematemesis. endoscopy revealed mucosal damage throughout the oral cavity, esophagus, and stomach. There was no evidence of perforation. After intubation and gastric lavage, hemodialysis was performed. The patient was discharged uneventfully on the 16(th) day. This case highlights a very rare acute selenium intoxication. serum and urinary selenium levels and serum glutathione peroxidase activities during the patient's course were followed, as well as the mucosal corrosive damage caused by the selenium.
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keywords = animal
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2/7. Appearance of a gastric ulcer during diphosphonate therapy in a woman with CRST syndrome.

    A 46-year-old woman with the CRST variant of scleroderma (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasis) was treated with a diphosphonate (disodium etidronate) in an effort to reduce her dystrophic calcifications or retard their progression. After 18 months of therapy, no improvement in her calcinosis was noted. In addition, she developed bloody diarrhea, epigastric burning, and weight loss during the last two months of Therapy. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed a gastric ulcer. endoscopy with biopsy proved it to be benign. Gastric ulcerations has been seen in animals given disodium etidronate but only at much higher doses than are currently recommended for humans. Although a cause and effect relationship cannot be established with certainty in this patient, it is suggested since she was not receiving other ulcerogenic drugs chronically. This information may be important to other investigators of disodium etidronate.
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keywords = animal
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3/7. cimetidine-induced xerosis and asteatotic dermatitis.

    cimetidine, a histamine H2-receptor antagonist, has previously been shown to have antiandrogenic activity in animals and to decrease the sebum excretion rate in humans. Two patients had generalized xerosis and asteatotic dermatitis that developed while they were receiving cimetidine therapy and resolved when cimetidine therapy was discontinued. We postulate that this skin change is related to the antiandrogenic properties of the drug and its effect on the sebum secretion rate.
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keywords = animal
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4/7. Misuse of veterinary phenylbutazone.

    phenylbutazone is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that was commonly prescribed for the treatment of arthritic conditions; it is no longer available for use in humans because of its numerous side effects, including aplastic anemia. We describe a horse trainer who developed gastric ulcers and renal insufficiency as a result of taking veterinary phenylbutazone. A review of the literature reveals a pattern of abuse by those who work with and around animals. When appropriate, patients who work around animals should be questioned about illicit phenylbutazone consumption.
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keywords = animal
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5/7. Acute gastritis associated with spiral organisms from cats.

    Numerous studies implicated helicobacter pylori as one causative agent producing gastritis and dyspepsia. Recent reports focus on another bacterium, Gastrospirillum hominis, as a possible pathogen producing gastritis. We report a 30-year-old researcher who became acutely ill with epigastric pain indicative of esophagitis or peptic ulcer disease. gastritis and a gastric ulcer were observed endoscopically. Histological examination of the gastric mucosa revealed an acute gastritis and large spiral-shaped organisms. The spiral forms were present in large quantities in the gastric mucosa of experimental animals (cats) handled by the patient in his research. Electron microscopy confirmed that the organisms from the cat and patient were morphologically identical. The patient was successfully treated with bismuth subsalicylate. His symptoms resolved and the organisms were cleared from his stomach. This study provides evidence that another bacterium, a Gastrospirillum, may cause gastritis in man and may be transmitted from animal to man.
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ranking = 2
keywords = animal
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6/7. Acute effects of sucralfate aspiration: clinical and laboratory observations.

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess the complications associated with the aspiration of sucralfate. DESIGN: Clinical (case report) and bench observations. SETTING: Inpatient intensive care unit and experimental animal laboratory. SUBJECTS: The case of a critically ill patient who aspirated sucralfate is presented. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats served as experimental animals to investigate the acute histologic effects of large-volume aspiration of sucralfate. INTERVENTIONS: The patient underwent emergent intubation to relieve acute upper airway obstruction. All the animals were anesthetized and had tracheostomies performed. The experimental groups had acidic intratracheal injections of 2 ml/kg of a nonparticulate liquid (pH, 2.3; n = 6) or a sucralfate aspirate (1 ml/kg of a 5% sucralfate suspension of pH 3.6, followed by 1 ml/kg 0.1 of normal hydrochloric acid of pH 1.0; n = 4). Four hours after simulated aspiration, the rats were sacrificed and their lungs removed for histologic examination by light microscopy. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Differences were noted in histopathologic injury in the experimental groups compared to the control group using a numeric scoring scale. Nonparticulate acidic liquid aspiration caused a significant increase (p < 0.05) in inflammation. sucralfate caused a significant increase (p < 0.05) in lung hemorrhage. A nonsignificant trend was seen with simulated sucralfate aspiration for edema and inflammation. No long-term sequelae were attributed to the clinical aspiration episode. CONCLUSIONS: Acute complications associated with aspiration of sucralfate have been identified. In the laboratory setting, simulated aspiration of sucralfate led to acute lung injury.
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ranking = 3
keywords = animal
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7/7. Presence of multiple "helicobacter heilmannii" strains in an individual suffering from ulcers and in his two cats.

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that "helicobacter heilmannii" infection is an example of zoonosis. The presence of "H. heilmannii" strains in a human subject with acute gastric erosions, in his two cats, and in two unrelated cats was analyzed, and the genetic relatedness of the human and feline strains was assessed. A 580-bp, PCR-amplified sequence of "H. heilmannii" urease B gene (ureB) obtained from biopsies from the human subject and his two cats was restricted with AluI and cloned for sequencing. Analysis of the restriction fragment length polymorphism of the ureB-amplified product suggested the presence of different individual "H. heilmannii" strains in the cats and of three distinct strains in the human subject. One of the "H. heilmannii" ureB sequences amplified from the human subject's biopsies was identical to that derived from one of his cats. The degree of similarity between the other "H. heilmannii" human and feline nucleotide sequences was higher than 97%. Most of the base substitutions were conservative. We conclude that human and animal "H. heilmannii" strains are closely related and that humans can be infected by more than one "H. heilmannii" strain, as has been observed for helicobacter pylori.
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keywords = animal
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