Cases reported "Stomach Ulcer"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/43. pneumoperitoneum caused by a perforated peptic ulcer in a peritoneal dialysis patient: difficulty in diagnosis.

    peritonitis due to viscus perforation in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients can be catastrophic. We describe the first reported case of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) in a PD patient. This 78-year-old man presented with a 1-day history of mild abdominal pain. He had been receiving nocturnal intermittent PD for 2 years and had ischemic heart disease and cirrhosis of the liver. pneumoperitoneum and peritonitis were documented, but the symptoms were mild. The "board-like abdomen" sign was not noted. air inflation and contrast radiography indicated a perforation in the upper gastrointestinal tract, and laparotomy disclosed a perforation in the prepyloric great curvature. Unfortunately, the patient died during surgery. This case illustrates that the "board-like abdomen" sign may be absent in PD patients with PPU because of dilution of gastric acid by the dialysate. Free air in the abdomen, although suggestive of PPU, is also not uncommon in PD patients without viscus perforation. Because PD has to be discontinued after laparotomy and exploratory laparotomy may be fatal in high-risk patients, other diagnostic methods should be used to confirm viscus perforation before surgery. PPU, which can be proved by air inflation and contrast radiography, should be suspected in PD patients with pneumoperitoneum and peritonitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastric acid, acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/43. Non-traumatic liver rupture due to a perforated gastric ulcer.

    The case of a 57-year-old woman with a fatal liver rupture due to a necrotizing perihepatic abscess caused by a perforated gastric ulcer is presented. The ulcer had been treated successfully by surgical intervention 8 days before. The autopsy revealed a large perihepatic abscess and multiple ruptures of Glisson's capsule with a large subcapsular hematoma and underlying lacerations of the liver parenchyma. The patient had no history of previous abdominal trauma and the known etiological factors for spontaneous liver rupture were excluded by the autopsy findings or by clinical and laboratory data. No liver penetration by the gastric ulcer was found at autopsy and there were no clinical signs or symptoms for an infection or any degenerative or inflammatory diseases. Histologically abundant vegetable fibers, identified as stomach contents and a dense infiltrate of lymphocytes and granulocytes were found in the perihepatic abscess next to Glisson's capsule. Below Glisson's capsule there were hemorrhages, focal hepatocellular necrosis and a mixed cell inflammatory infiltration. In the present case, preceding perforation of the gastric ulcer with leaking of gastric acid into the peritoneal cavity resulted in peptic digestion of Glisson's capsule. Vascular lesions of the affected parts of Glisson's capsule and the liver parenchyma underneath resulted in intrahepatic hemorrhage and an increase in intrahepatic pressure with subsequent liver rupture. To the authors' knowledge no similar case of spontaneous liver rupture due to perforation of a gastric ulcer has been reported previously.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00043206800162465
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/43. Relapse of duodenal ulcers after successful eradication of helicobacter pylori in gastric ulcer patients.

    Relapse of duodenal ulcers was observed endoscopically after helicobacter pylori eradication therapy for gastric ulcer patients in 2 of 32 successful cases. One patient, a 40-year-old woman, received dual therapy with lansoprazole 60mg and amoxicillin 1000mg for 2 weeks because of an intractable, easily-relapsing gastric ulcer accompanied by duodenal ulcer scars that had not relapsed for 5 years. The H. pylori status was assessed by a rapid urease test, light microscopy, culture, and anti-H. pylori antibody. At 24 months after the cure of H. pylori she had upper abdominal pain and showed relapse not of the gastric ulcer but of the duodenal ulcer. The H. pylori status remained negative. The other patient, a 44-year-old man, showed an active gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer scars at the first endoscopy. He received the same regimen as described above. Ten weeks after completion of the eradication therapy, endoscopy showed healing of the gastric ulcer and relapse of the duodenal ulcer despite successful eradication. These two cases suggest that H. pylori eradication modifies the pathophysiological condition of gastric acid secretion and facilitates relapse of duodenal ulcers.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastric acid, acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/43. Prevention of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in 582 burned children.

    In 582 burned children, neutralization of gastric acid and reduction of psychic stress were utilized to reduce upper gastrointestinal ulceration and hemorrhage. While receiving milk, diazepam, and psychologic support, two children required operation. Two of the children who died without clinically apparent gastrointestinal disease had ulcers discovered at autopsy. We conclude that a prophylactic regimen that reduced the amount of acid bathing the gastroduodenal mucosa, provides adequate calories, and minimizes psychic stress is useful in preventing gastrointestinal hemorrhage after burns.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.0004320680016
keywords = gastric acid, acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/43. Penetration by a giant gastric ulcer induced by a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    A patient presented with penetration by a giant gastric ulcer resulting from treatment with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. A test for helicobacter pylori proved negative. Treatment with a combination of an inhibitor of gastric acid secretion and prostaglandin substitution therapy with misoprostol resulted in closure of the perforation and cicatrization of the gastric ulcer without the need for laparotomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastric acid, acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/43. Perforated gastric ulcer complicating corticosteroid therapy in acute rheumatic fever.

    We report an 11-year-old boy with acute rheumatic fever who presented with gastric perforation while treated with corticosteroids (CS). He had been treated initially with acetylsalicylic acid for 11 days, CS replaced the treatment with acetylsalicylic acid due to deterioration of carditis. The possible pathogenesis is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0008641360032493
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/43. Invasive mucormycosis in benign gastric ulcer.

    Fungal elements are frequently noted overlying the base of chronic peptic ulcers of the stomach and it has been suggested that the fungi enhance the degree of necrosis and that these cases have protracted disease and deeper ulcers with more perforations. It has also been postulated that the number of fungal elements might be increased in the stomach of patients who are receiving potent medications such as H2-receptor antagonists to reduce gastric acidity, but there have not been adequate control studies, and the deleterious effects from the presence of the fungi in these cases have not been substantiated. We present a very rare case of invasive mucormycosis (phycomycosis) occurring in the base of a chronic gastric ulcer in a 55 years old diabetic male. This case was clinically and radiologically been mistaken for a gastric carcinoma. In addition, the ulcer was complicated by perforation and fungal septicemia with subsequent fatal outcome. The clinical, radiological and histopathological features are described together with a literature review of other reported fungal gastric ulcers.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gastric acid, acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/43. Benign gastric ulcer in a patient with pernicious anemia.

    This is the report of the presence of a benign gastric ulcer in a patient with achlorhydria and documented pernicious anemia. The pernicious anemia was established by a Histalog-fast achlorhydria, a schilling test of 2.1% excretion of tagges vitamin B12 in a 24-hr urine, and reticulocytosis after administration of cyanocobalamine. Following Histalog (1.5 mg per kg of body weight), the gastric volume was 40 ml, there was no acid, and the pH was 8.1. The ulcer demonstrated by gastroscopy was confirmed at gastrectomy. Histological examination of the ulcer and the remainder of the stomach showed no malignancy. The principal conclusion of this paper is that the patient did not have an acid-produced ulcer, but that bile regurgitation coupled with alcohol ingestion produced the lesion. Surgical investigation of the ulcer seemed mandatory because of the known increased incidence of gastric carcinoma in patients with pernicious anemia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0008641360032493
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/43. Atypical histiocytic infiltration simulating diffuse-type carcinoma in a gastric ulcer due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    A 83-year old man treated with naproxen during two years was admitted because of hypovolemia and peritoneal irritation. A panendoscopic study was performed and an ulcer localized at the large curvature of the stomach was disclosed. In the gastrectomy specimen the ulcer showed necrosis, edema, fibrosis, chronic inflammatory infiltrate with lymphocytes and plasma cells. Additionally, atypical cells with irregular and hyperchromatic nuclei or vacuolated cytoplasm were seen in the lamina propia and infiltrating the muscular layers; isolated signet-ring-like cells were also seen. Histochemical study with periodic acid-Schiff, mucicarmin, and colloidal stains revealed mucosubstances in these cells. A poorly differentiated carcinoma was initially diagnosed. However, the immunohistochemical study were positive for histiocytic markers (CD-68, S-100 protein) and negative for epithelial markers (cytokeratin; and epithelial membrane antigen). The positivity of mucus stains in the histiocytes could be explained in this case by phagocytosis of mucous substances released from broken hyperplastic glands in the vicinity of the ulcer. To our knowledge, atypical histiocytic infiltration in gastric ulcers has not been previously described; thus, it should be included in the group of gastric carcinoma mimicks.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00043206800162465
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/43. Prevention and treatment of stress ulcers in critically ill patients.

    Critically ill patients are at increased risk of developing stress-related mucosal lesions. The pathogenesis of stress-related mucosal disease is not entirely clear, but probably is associated with impairment of mucosal protective mechanisms due to compromised gastric mucosal microcirculation. Acid also plays an integral role. The incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding among intensive care unit patients has been declining over the past 30 years. Only a small proportion of patients with stress-related mucosal lesions develop clinically overt bleeding, and the majority of the overt bleedings do not lead to hemodynamic instability. However, the presence of gastrointestinal bleeding in a critically ill patient predicts markedly increased mortality. Prolonged mechanical ventilation and coagulopathy are the most important predictors of stress ulcer related bleeding. Critically ill patients with stress ulcer related bleeding should be managed in the acute setting just as patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Available evidence supports the use of stress ulcer prophylaxis in patients with risk factors for bleeding. Both histamine 2 receptor antagonists and sucralfate are effective forms of stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis. More potent acid suppression by proton pump inhibitors may offer additional benefit in the prevention of stress ulcer bleeding.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00043206800162465
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Stomach Ulcer'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.