Cases reported "Stomatitis"

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1/17. High dose rate microselectron mould ratiotherapy of a widespread superficial oral cancer.

    Treatment of a case of widespread superficial oral squamous cell carcinoma with external beam irradiation, followed by high dose rate Microselectron mould radiotherapy, is reported. The tumor disappeared macroscopically after treatment, but there was infield recurrence in the buccogingival sulcus where the radiation dose might have been inadequate. Apart from some radiation mucositis within the treated area, edema and a superficial ulcer were observed in the tongue. These were considered to be due to radiation overdose. Although there is room for improvement, this mode of treatment has something to offer patients with hard-to-cure cancer.
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2/17. Plasma cell infiltration of the upper aerodigestive tract treated with radiation therapy.

    A case of chronic, fluctuating plasma cell gingivostomatitis that progressed despite chemotherapy and surgery is reported. This is the first case reported of treatment with radiation therapy, and one of the few cases reported where the infiltrate has reached the larynx. After receiving low dose radiation therapy, via a conformal technique encompassing the respiratory mucosal lining from the base of tongue to carina, there has been symptomatic improvement.
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3/17. nickel allergy associated with a transpalatal arch appliance.

    AIM: The purpose of this article was to present a case in which nickel sensitivity of the oral mucosa was demonstrated during the use of a transpalatal arch appliance (TPA). CASE REPORT: An 11-year 8-month old post-menarchal female presented for orthodontic treatment with Class III buccal segments and bilateral open bite. The treatment plan consisted of placing a rapid palatal expansion appliance (RPE) and a TPA with soldered lateral tongue cribs, in order to eliminate her tongue thrusting habit. 8 months into treatment, the gingiva of the right posterior segment began to hypertrophy, particularly around the bands of the right first molar and premolar. A patch test of 5% nickel sulfate indicated a positive reaction to nickel. The treatment was finished without the use of nickel titanium wires and the mucosa reaction resolved. The patient had had her ear pierced at age 2 days old, which was 11 years before orthodontic treatment was initiated. The literature shows that this exposure may have been the sensitizing event. CONCLUSIONS: While the nickel sensitive patient may not present an extreme medical risk, the orthodontist must be aware of the problem and the likelihood of treating patients with this condition. It appears that the reaction may vary from patient to patient. The practitioner should possess a basic understanding of the occurrence rate, sex predilection, and signs and symptoms of allergy to nickel, and should be familiar with the best possible alternative modes of treatment, to provide the safest, most effective care possible in these cases. Practitioners should be aware that symptoms of nickel allergy may closely mimic those of typical gingival changes during orthodontic treatment of circumpubertal children.
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4/17. A patient with rothmund-thomson syndrome and tongue cancer--experience of radiation toxicity.

    We describe a male patient with rothmund-thomson syndrome (RTS) given postoperative radiotherapy for squamous carcinoma of the tongue. This was well tolerated. This is only the second reported case of oral cancer and radiotherapy in RTS.
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keywords = tongue
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5/17. Gingivo-mucosal and cutaneous reactions to amalgam fillings.

    BACKGROUND: A number of reports exist on the side effects of materials used to restore teeth. Most of the cases involve local allergy reactions, but also skin lesions are described. Few cases are described where both local effects on the mucosa and skin lesions distant to the oral cavity are caused by amalgam. RESULT: The case presented indicates that the release of mercury from amalgam fillings is able to induce hypersensitivity reactions resulting in soft-tissue changes in the gingiva, buccal mucosa, tongue and on the skin of the back of the hands.
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6/17. Necrotizing stomatitis in the developed world.

    We present a case of a malnourished 68-year old man with occult hypothyroidism who presented with malaise, pyrexia, tongue swelling, oral ulceration and dysphagia after a 6-month period of increasing lethargy and failing self-care. Severe necrotic oral ulcerative lesions were accompanied by cutaneous purpura, blood-filled blisters and bedsores. It was concluded that the patient's clinical condition reflected necrotizing stomatitis on a background of malnutrition with scorbutic skin lesions and hypothyroidism. The patient made a good recovery with scrupulous oral hygiene, debridement, intravenous metronidazole and nutritional support. Healing occurred with marked fibrosis and trismus, which has slowly improved with mouth-opening exercises. Necrotizing stomatitis is more commonly encountered in malnourished children in developing countries, and may subsequently result in devastating facial defects and death. patients in the developed world with poor oral hygiene, malnourishment and immunosuppression are also at risk, but early diagnosis and treatment is life-saving and reduces subsequent disability.
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7/17. Benign migratory stomatitis: a literature review and case report.

    Although benign migratory stomatitis (BMS) was first reported in the literature as early as 1955 (Cooke), fewer than 40 cases have been recorded. This article reviews the literature and describes a case of BMS involving the ventral surface of the tongue of a 74-year-old male. This is the first South African case to be reported.
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8/17. Migratory stomatitis: a case report.

    This case report discusses a 42-year-old male patient who presented with migratory stomatitis located on the labial and buccal mucosa and the lateral tongue border. The lesions were circumscribed, flat, smooth, and red in color with a slightly raised white border varying in size from 3 mm to over 1 cm. Duration was between 7 and 14 days and healing transpired without scarring. Follow-up continued for approximately 1 year and at each visit several lesions were seen. The possibility of stress and heredity as positive factors was considered, but with so few reported cases conclusions would be purely speculative. The absence of dermatologic pathology does not aid in establishing a relationship with psoriasis, however there is a microscopic similarity. An almost total lack of clinical symptoms may contribute to this sparse documentation, therefore dental practitioners should be articularly observant when examining oral soft tissues. Further recognition and investigation is necessary before a cause can be discovered.
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9/17. Multiple, shallow, circinate mucosal erosions on the soft palate and base of uvula.

    stomatitis areata migrans is an uncommon oral disease that may affect mucous membranes other than the tongue or be concomitant with geographic tongue. The clinical appearance emulates geographic tongue at an ectopic site, and the lesions rarely are symptomatic.
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keywords = tongue
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10/17. Plasma cell orificial mucositis. Report of a case and review of the literature.

    Plasma cell orificial mucositis is a benign idiopathic condition of orificial mucous membranes, characterized histopathologically by a dense plasmacytic infiltrate. Although plasma cell orificial mucositis was originally described by Zoon as occurring on the glans penis, conditions similar to plasma cell orificial mucositis involving other body orifices have been reported under various names. A patient with involvement of the lips and epiglottis associated with psoriasis and fissured tongue is described. Plasma cell orificial mucositis must be differentiated from numerous other entities, including erythroplasia of Queyrat, allergic contact mucositis, plasmacytoma, plasmoacanthoma, syphilis, candidiasis, and cheilitis granulomatosa.
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