Cases reported "Streptococcal Infections"

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1/37. Group C streptococcal meningitis: case report and review of the literature.

    Group C streptococci are a common cause of epidemic bacterial infection in animals. These organisms are a rare but frequently fatal cause of meningitis in humans. We report the case of a 13-year-old girl with meningitis caused by a group C Streptococcus (Streptococcus zooepidemicus) successfully treated with vancomycin and third generation cephalosporins. We also review cases of group C streptococcal meningitis reported previously.
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2/37. Streptococcal meningitis resulting from contact with an infected horse.

    We report a case of group C streptococcal meningitis in a woman with a history of close animal contact as well as head trauma as a result of a kick by a horse. blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures grew streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, as did a throat culture taken from the colt that had kicked her 2 weeks prior to admission.
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3/37. endocarditis caused by penicillin-resistant viridans streptococci: 2 cases and controversies in therapy.

    Although penicillin-resistant viridans streptococci have been isolated from samples from the mouth, blood, and wounds in increasing numbers, viridans streptococci isolated from patients with endocarditis have remained sensitive to penicillin for the past 5 decades. We report the cases of 2 patients with penicillin-resistant viridans streptococcal endocarditis, review 6 other cases from the literature, and summarize 2 studies that used an animal model of penicillin-resistant viridans streptococcal endocarditis.
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4/37. Acute bacterial arthritis caused by group C streptococci.

    OBJECTIVES: To summarize the characteristics of and clinical experience with joint infection by group C streptococcus. methods: Two new cases of acute bacterial arthritis due to group C streptococci are reported, and a medline search was performed, which located 22 additional cases. RESULTS: Mean age ( /- standard deviation) of all 24 patients was 46 /- 25 years, and most patients were men (75%). The species most frequently identified was Streptococcus equisimilis (12 cases). Eight patients (33%) had a general risk factor for infection, and the same percentage had some type of arthropathy. Only 3 patients had previous contact with animals. The infection was polyarticular in a third of cases, and the joint most frequently involved was the knee. The majority of patients showed a good response to the treatment with intravenous penicillin. However, 3 patients had functional sequelae, 2 more had residual radiological lesions, and 3 died. CONCLUSIONS: Acute bacterial arthritis due to group C streptococci is a serious but uncommon entity that can affect patients without risk factors. Rapid diagnosis and treatment may improve the outcome. Semin arthritis rheum 31:43-51.
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5/37. A definite case of spondylodiscitis caused by Streptococcus equisimilis.

    To shed light on the role of Streptococcus equisimilis (SE) in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc infection, we report here a case of lumbar spondylodiscitis in a 37-year-old male caused by SE, with identification of this strain by cultures from L4-L5 lumbar disc biopsy. Intravenous therapy with penicillin and gentamycin combined with immobilization resulted in a rapid and complete recovery. The patient did not have underlying disease and showed no obvious history of exposure to animals. We conclude that SE may be responsible for both septic arthritis and spondylodiscitis.
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6/37. Identification of isolates of Streptococcus canis infecting humans.

    During a survey of Group G and C streptococcal infections of humans two epidemiologically unrelated Group G streptococcal isolates were identified, one from a case of bacteremia and one from a wound infection. These isolates were atypical among this sample in that the emm gene could not be amplified from them by PCR. Biochemical characterization identified the isolates as Streptococcus canis, an organism normally associated with animal hosts. The biochemical identification was confirmed by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from both isolates and comparison with sequences of the S. canis type strain and other related streptococci of animals and humans. Comparative sequencing of fragments of two other housekeeping genes, sodA and mutS, confirmed that the isolates are most closely related to S. canis. The identification of two isolates of S. canis from a relatively small sample set suggests that the practice of identifying streptococci only by the Lancefield serological group may result in underestimation of the presence of S. canis in the human population.
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7/37. surgical wound infection associated with staphylococcus sciuri.

    We describe a case of surgical wound infection due to staphylococcus sciuri. The isolated strain was susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin and resistant to gentamicin, clindamycin, rifampicin, methicillin, ampicillin and ceftriaxone. The multiresistance of the strain had a serious impact on the prolonged course of the infection. Although this bacterium is principally found in animals, our strain was probably of nosocomial origin.
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8/37. Streptococcus zooepidemicus meningitis and bacteraemia.

    Group C streptococci are common causative agents of epidemic infections in animals and a rare cause of meningitis in humans. The case is reported of a 75-y-old man with meningitis caused by a group C streptococcus (Streptococcus zooepidemicus). He had frequent contact with horses, which were a possible source of infection. In spite of treatment with a third generation cephalosporin, the outcome was fatal.
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9/37. Non-life-threatening sepsis: report of two cases.

    streptococcus bovis is one of the nonenterococcal species included among the streptococci group D. It is part of the normal bowel flora in humans and animals, but it is also responsible for infectious diseases (10-15% of all cases of bacterial endocarditis). Many cases of bacteremia and metastatic abscesses (spleen, liver, soft tissues, bone, meninges, endocardium) caused by S. bovis were reported as associated with digestive tract diseases, mainly colonic disease, and, in particular colonic neoplasms, or chronic liver diseases. A role in carcinogenesis has been suggested for this microorganism. The authors report two cases of S. bovis sepsis, one associated with colonic neoplasm and the other with liver cirrhosis and gastric carcinoma. Discussion is focused on probable mechanisms that favor gastric colonization and systemic diffusion of S. bovis from the gut in patients with gastrointestinal neoplasms or chronic liver disease and provides clinical recommendations for patients with S. bovis infections.
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10/37. Group C streptococcal bacteremia: a case report from india.

    Group C streptococci are a common cause of infection in animals and a rare cause of bacteremia in human beings. The entity is often seen in elderly people with a severe underlying illness. We report here the only case of Group C streptococcal bacteremia reported in our hospital, caused by Streptococcus equisimilis, a beta-hemolytic Group C streptococcus. The patient was a 10-year old male with a known history of aplastic anemia. In spite of specific therapy with penicillin, the outcome was fatal.
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