Cases reported "Streptococcal Infections"

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1/77. Pacemaker-related endocarditis. Report of 7 cases and review of the literature.

    We report on 7 patients with pacemaker endocarditis diagnosed during the workup of long-standing fever. Persistent positive blood cultures and echocardiography led to the diagnosis in 6 patients whereas autopsy was diagnostic in another. Causative microorganisms were staphylococcus epidermidis (3), staphylococcus lugdunensis (1), pseudomonas aeruginosa (1), streptococcus bovis (1), and streptococcus mitis-streptococcus sanguis (1). pulmonary embolism was present in nearly 50% of the cases, a figure clearly higher than previously reported. In all but 1 case the initial medical approach was not successful, and thus the pacing system was finally removed. None of the cases relapsed after the removal. We have reviewed the literature regarding pacemaker endocarditis, particularly with respect to treatment.
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keywords = bovis
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2/77. Bacterial complications of strongyloidiasis: streptococcus bovis meningitis.

    We report the case of a 64-year-old veteran who had streptococcus bovis meningitis as a result of a long latent strongyloides infection that became acute when he was treated with prednisone. We reviewed 38 reported cases of serious bacterial infections associated with strongyloidiasis. patients most frequently had nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. Of these 38 patients, 21 (55%) had meningitis, and 28 (73%) had bacteremia that was polymicrobial in 3 cases (8%). Other sites of infection included lung, bone marrow, ascites, mitral valve, and lymph node. Most infections were due to enteric gram-negative bacteria. There is one previously reported case of S bovis meningitis. Thirty-four of the patients (89%) were immunosuppressed; 21 of these (55%) were taking pharmacologic doses of adrenal corticosteroids. Thirty-three of the 38 (87%) patients died. patients with enteric bacterial infection without an obvious cause should be tested for the presence of strongyloidiasis.
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ranking = 6
keywords = bovis
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3/77. bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis due to streptococcus bovis.

    The diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis is easily missed, especially in the elderly in whom clinical signs of bacteremia might not be manifest. Spontaneously occurring disc-space infection in adults often has an insidious presentation. The infecting microorganism can be difficult to identify. Although discitis due to streptococcus bovis is occasionally found, it is often difficult to fully confirm the diagnosis. Here, a case of vertebral osteomyelitis due to this microorganism is reported.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bovis
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4/77. streptococcus bovis meningitis in an infant.

    streptococcus bovis is a nonenterococcal, group D streptococcus which has been identified as a causative agent for serious human infections, including endocarditis, bacteremia, and septic arthritis. Several cases of adult S. bovis meningitis have been reported, usually in association with underlying disease. In the neonatal period, it is an uncommon agent of meningitis. We report, to our knowledge, the third documented case of neonatal S. bovis meningitis in the English language literature. As in the previous cases, this neonate showed no anatomical or congenital immunologic lesion which might be expected to predispose the patient to meningitis. Sequencing of the 16S ribosomal dna gene was performed and a new PCR test was used to secure a more reliable identification of the strain.
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ranking = 7
keywords = bovis
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5/77. Unusual association: streptococcus bovis tricuspid endocarditis with atrial-septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale.

    streptococcus bovis endocarditis is a frequent cause of streptococcal endocarditis and is associated with colonic tumours. The tricuspid valve is very rarely affected and its involvement is a complication which can lead to a less favourable outcome. We report the seventh case of tricuspid valve endocarditis due to S. bovis, and the first, to our knowledge, to be associated with an atrial-septal aneurysm and a patent foramen ovale. The underlying medical conditions and predisposing factors for development of tricuspid valve endocarditis are described and interesting new echocardiographic data are presented. The current guidelines on antibiotic therapy for S. bovis tricuspid valve endocarditis are reviewed.
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ranking = 7
keywords = bovis
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6/77. Unretrieved gallstones presenting as a streptococcus bovis liver abscess.

    We describe a case of a delayed liver abscess presenting two years after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. At exploration, the patient was found to have an unretrieved gallstone as the nidus for the streptococcus bovis abscess.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bovis
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7/77. Thoracic empyema associated with recurrent colon cancer: report of a case and review of the literature.

    Many types of infections associated with colorectal cancer have been reported. Here, we describe a rare case of thoracic empyema that was observed during immunotherapy for recurrent colon cancer. culture of the pleural fluid yielded streptococcus bovis, which is known to be associated with gastrointestinal lesions, especially colorectal malignancies. The possible correlation between these two clinical entities-empyema and colon cancer-is discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bovis
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8/77. A first case of streptococcus bovis bacteremia and peritonitis from endometrial cancer origin.

    BACKGROUND: The most important clinical infections caused by streptococcus bovis are bacteremia and endocarditis. Usually, streptococcus bovis bacteremia has been described in association with bowel pathology. CASE REPORT: A 67-year-old woman with an history of endometrial cancer Ic was admitted with the suspicion of peritonitis at examination. At exploratory laparotomy, a total hysterectomy was performed and the abdomen was drained. histology revealed an uterine adenocarcinoma staged IIIa with intramyometrial cocci accumulation. streptococcus bovis was isolated from the peritoneal fluid cultures and three haemocultures. CONCLUSION: Because we excluded bowel pathology and endocarditis, this is the first case of streptococcus bovis bacteremia from endometrial cancer origin.
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ranking = 4
keywords = bovis
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9/77. discitis associated with pregnancy and spinal anesthesia.

    discitis (inflammation of the intervertebral disk) most commonly develops as a rare complication of bacterial infection or chemical or mechanical irritation during spine surgery (1) with a postoperative incidence of 1%-2.8% (2). It is also a complication of discography-the intradiscal injection of saline or contrast material (3). The incidence of postdiscography discitis is 1%-4% (3); no cases have been reported when prophylactic antibiotics have been used, supporting the theory of bacterial contamination (3). Although it is controversial whether discitis can be caused by an aseptic or infectious process, recent data suggest that persistent discitis is almost always bacterial (4). Honan et al. (5) reported 16 cases of spontaneous discitis and reviewed another 52 patients from the literature. In their series, patients tended to have one or more comorbid conditions, such as diabetes, vertebral fracture, or a preexisting spine injury. Spontaneous discitis has also been associated with advanced age, IV drug abuse, IV access contamination, urinary tract infection, and immunocompromised states (5,6). No cases of infectious discitis associated with pregnancy and spinal anesthesia have been reported in the English literature. discitis presents as spasmodic pain in the back that may be referred to the hips or groin (7). The pain may radiate to the lower extremities. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate is usually increased. Radiological changes in discitis include narrowing of the intervertebral disk space, vertebral sclerosis, and erosion of the end plates. The best diagnostic measure may be magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or a combination of bone and gallium scanning (2). The mainstay for discitis treatment is pain control and antibiotics; surgical intervention is usually not required. Complications of discitis include intervertebral fusion, epidural abscess, and paralysis. IMPLICATIONS: This is a case report of a disk infection (discitis) caused by the bacteria, streptococcus bovis after spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery. S. bovis rarely causes discitis, and spinal anesthesia for labor and delivery has not been reported as a cause of discitis.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bovis
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10/77. streptococcus bovis meningitis in a healthy adult patient.

    We describe the first case in the English language of streptococcus bovis meningitis in a 45-y-old patient without any underlying disease or predisposing condition. S. bovis biotype II was isolated from his spinal fluid and blood. The illness was community-acquired and was clinically and biologically similar to disease caused by the classical meningeal pathogens. The patient was cured after 10 d of therapy with ceftriaxone and, 2.5 y later, is currently healthy. As a result of this case and a similar case published recently in the Spanish literature we conclude that S. bovis should be considered a microorganism capable of causing meningitis in the absence of any underlying condition or clear focus of infection.
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ranking = 7
keywords = bovis
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