Cases reported "Streptococcal Infections"

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1/123. Spinal anaesthesia and meningitis in former preterm infants: cause-effect?

    meningitis associated with spinal anaesthesia is a rare but well-known complication. We report on a case of fatal bacterial meningitis following spinal anaesthesia in a former preterm infant. The aetiology of this meningitis could not be established. Former preterm infants represent a high-risk population because of their susceptibility to group B streptococcal meningitis at this age as documented in a second case. Therefore we discuss whether meningitis was consequential or coincidental with spinal anaesthesia and could have been prevented by more comprehensive preoperative laboratory screening or prophylactic antibiotics.
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keywords = dental
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2/123. Severe prosthetic valve-related endocarditis following dental scaling: a case report.

    There is a well-known correlation between surgical dental procedures and the risk of bacterial endocarditis in patients with prosthetic cardiac valves. A 43-year-old patient with prosthetic aortic and mitral valves, which already have been removed twice because of endocarditis, suffered from a prosthetic valve-related endocarditis following dental scaling, which was performed without any antibiotic prophylaxis. Invasive medical procedures in patients with prosthetic heart valves may lead to endocarditis. antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended even for dental procedures considered to be "harmless," such as dental scaling.
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ranking = 8
keywords = dental
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3/123. risk factors for maternal colonization with group B beta-hemolytic streptococci.

    Colonization with group B beta-hemolytic streptococci (GBS) at any time during pregnancy is an important risk factor for neonatal sepsis. To determine which groups of pregnant women are at high risk for GBS, a retrospective chart review was conducted on 608 pregnant women who had recorded data on prenatal charts and were seen between October 1995 and December 1997 at a family practice-run prenatal clinic. A total of 543 subjects were studied after exclusion of women who had no results of GBS colonization recorded. Demographically, the study population comprised 91.1% white non-Hispanic, 4.8% African-American, 1.5% Asian, and 2.6% white Hispanic women; 28.9% were primiparas, 38.9% unmarried; 60.0% low income; 31.1% smokers, 7.7% with a history of drug or alcohol use; 8.4% with a history of sexually transmitted disease; and 27.2% with fewer than 11 prenatal visits. The mean age was 26.4 years (range, 14 to 42 years). Seventy-six (14.0%) of the study subjects were colonized with GBS. White non-Hispanic women had a GBS colonization prevalence of 13.6%; for all others, prevalence was 18.7%. No statistically significant differences were found in regard to age, weight, number of prenatal visits, income level, marital status, history of drug use, or parity. The GBS colonization rate for smokers was 33.1% versus 16.4% for nonsmokers (P = .012). Maternal colonization of GBS was not found to be associated with any of the risk factors studied, other than smoking. This study identified smoking as a possible risk factor for GBS infection. Routine screening for GBS infection during pregnancy may be beneficial because no strong risk factors for colonization exist.
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ranking = 0.0065082343781561
keywords = white
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4/123. Bacterial endocarditis of dental origin: report of case.

    Although appreciated by most practitioners, the fact that dental infection may be the source of bacteremia without a history of recent dental procedures is occasionally overlooked. The case reported here illustrates what we feel is an example of such a phenomenon. The eradication of the oral foci of infection enhanced the patient's response to therapy and prompted his ultimate recovery.
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ranking = 6
keywords = dental
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5/123. Neutrophil antigen 5b is carried by a protein, migrating from 70 to 95 kDa, and may be involved in neonatal alloimmune neutropenia.

    BACKGROUND: Neutrophil antigen 5b has been described as involved in transfusion reactions and not in neonatal alloimmune neutropenia. CASE REPORT: Anti-5b was found in the serum of a mother of a persistently neutropenic newborn, who had several bacterial infections. The neutropenia responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor. immunoprecipitation experiments performed with this and three other 5b antisera identified a protein, migrating from 70 to 95 kDa, as carrier of 5b. The observed pattern of migration may point to heavy glycosylation of this protein. RESULTS: Six 5b-negative donors were identified among 54 screened white donors, for a 5b gene frequency of 0.66. CONCLUSION: Alloimmunization to 5b in pregnancy is rare. In the patients with neonatal neutropenia analyzed in the last decade, this was the first case discovered.
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ranking = 0.0032541171890781
keywords = white
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6/123. Necrotizing fasciitis after peritonsillar abscess in an immunocompetent patient.

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is a rapidly progressive, severe bacterial infection of the fascial planes of the head and neck. Group A beta haemolytic Streptococcus spp. (GABHS), staphylococcus spp., or obligatory anaerobic bacteria are the most common causative pathogens. The disease usually results from a dental source or facial trauma. Extensive fascial necrosis and severe systemic toxicity are common manifestations of CNF. review of the literature reveals only seven such cases, with four successful outcomes. The authors present the case of a 50-year-old immunocompetent female with CNF arising from a peritonsillar abscess. Intravenous immunoglobulins in conjunction with surgery and antibiotics were used successfully. The authors also suggest the importance of the early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and possible usefulness of the intravenous immunoglobulins in the treatment of CNF, especially when the disease is associated with toxic shock syndrome.
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keywords = dental
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7/123. Transverse leukonychia with systemic infection.

    Transverse white nail bands (leukonychia) have been described in association with systemic illnesses and exposure to toxins, and medications. We describe the occurrence of transverse nail bands in two patients following acute systemic illnesses. In the first case, transverse white nail bands developed in a 30-year-old human immunodeficiency virus-positive man following acute pulmonary tuberculosis. In the second case, transverse white nail bands were noted in an 80-year-old patient following streptococcus intermedius empyema.
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ranking = 0.0097623515672342
keywords = white
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8/123. Reiter's syndrome caused by Streptococcus viridans in a patient with hla-b27 antigen.

    A 26-year-old male patient with mitral valve prolapse and hla-b27 antigen received endodontic treatment for dental caries. Two weeks later fever, dysuria, diarrhea, sterile inflammatory arthritis of lower limbs, enthesitis, dactylitis, conjunctivitis, and uveitis consecutively developed. blood culture performed at the time of active arthritis yielded Streptococcus viridans. He did not have any history of psoriasis, acute infectious diarrhea, chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, or sexually transmitted diseases. Laboratory studies also excluded the possibility of infections by human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis b or C virus, chlamydia, and streptococci from the upper airway. This report indicates that Streptococcus viridans can be the triggering microorganisms of Reiter's syndrome in some circumstances.
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ranking = 10.781316049063
keywords = dental caries, dental, caries
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9/123. Bacterial endocarditis due to penicillin-resistant Streptococcus viridans.

    Bacterial endocarditis remains a formidable diagnostic and therapeutic problem for clinicians. Streptococcus viridans still accounts for 45 to 50 per cent of all cases and between 5 to 10 per cent of all clinical isolates of Streptococcus viridans from patients with bacterial endocarditis may be relatively resistant to penicillin. The case of a 9-year-old child with tetralogy of fallot and a Waterston shunt who subsequently developed bacterial endocarditis due to penicillin-resistant Streptococcus viridans following failure of oral penicillin dental prophylaxis is presented. In the face of penicillin resistance, additional considerations for workup, including microbiological assays for antimicrobial synergism become necessary in the selection of a therapeutic regimen.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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10/123. Acute metastatic infection of a revision total hip arthroplasty with oral bacteria after noninvasive dental treatment.

    The risk of hematogenous bacterial infection of a total joint prosthesis is currently considered to be greatest in the 2 years after arthroplasty or when the patient is chronically ill or immunocompromised, for dental treatments that are considered invasive, with a higher incidence of bacteremia. We report the case of a healthy man who had undergone revision hip arthroplasty 11 months previously and who developed acute signs of infection of the hip prosthesis with an oral organism 30 hours after supragingival dental cleaning, performed with the specific intention to be noninvasive, without antibiotic prophylaxis.
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ranking = 6
keywords = dental
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