Cases reported "Streptococcal Infections"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/18. When a mastoid swelling is not mastoiditis.

    A case is reported of swelling over the mastoid process due to subgaleal abscess possibly secondary to trivial cutaneous trauma. The diagnosis was difficult as subgaleal abscess is an extremely rare condition especially after the advent of the antibiotic era. The route of entry of the infection to the subgaleal space was unclear as there was no skin puncture. The absence of substantial trauma excluded subgaleal haematoma as a precondition. We would like to discuss the possible aetiologies and the management of this rare case in the light of the limited information available in the world literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/18. Iatrogenic meningitis: an increasing role for resistant viridans streptococci? Case report and review of the last 20 years.

    Iatrogenic meningitis following lumbar puncture is a rare event. We present a 52-y-old man who developed symptoms of meningitis within 12 h after spinal anaesthesia. cerebrospinal fluid cultures grew streptococcus salivarius partially resistant to penicillin and ceftriaxone. The patient was successfully treated with ceftriaxone and vancomycin and left the hospital with minor sequelae. A literature review of 60 cases revealed the median age of the patients to be 44 y. The median incubation period was 24 h. Most cases occurred after spinal anaesthesia (n = 27), myelography (n = 20) and diagnostic lumbar puncture (n = 5). Organisms were isolated in 52 cases, and streptococcal species were responsible for 33 (63%) of them. An upward trend in resistance of S. viridans isolates is cause for concern and may change empirical treatment strategies. Death was reported in 3 cases (5%) and was associated with pseudomonas and staphylococcal isolates. The recognition of this entity and the importance of proper infection control measures are underlined.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/18. Infected compartment syndrome after acupuncture.

    We present a case of septicaemia and compartment syndrome of the leg in a diabetic patient, following acupuncture to his calf. An emergency decompression fasciotomy was performed on the patient and gram-positive cocci were grown from the posterior compartment wound swab cultures and group A streptococcus from his blood cultures. He remained in the Intensive Therapy Unit postoperatively, requiring inotropic support and intravenous antibiotics for his septicaemia. We would like to remind acupuncturists, to consider the possibility of heightened risks in immunocompromised patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/18. Group B streptococcal retropharyngeal cellulitis in a young infant: a case report and review of the literature.

    The diagnosis of retropharyngeal cellulitis and abscess, although most common in children under 6 years of age, is often misdiagnosed in the newborn or early infancy period. The clinical signs of drooling, neck swelling, dysphagia, and torticollis may be absent or not easily identifiable. The following case report details a 2 1/2-month-old infant who presented with fever and irritability, and was subsequently diagnosed with group B streptococcal retropharyngeal cellulitis. Retropharyngeal cellulitis and abscess should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants and young children who present with fever and irritability, particularly when lumbar puncture results are normal. This case also serves to highlight a rare manifestation of late-onset group B steptococcal disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/18. Group B streptococcus endogenous endophthalmitis : case reports and review of the literature.

    PURPOSE: To report five cases of group B streptococcus endogenous endophthalmitis (GBSEE) and to review the literature. DESIGN: Retrospective, noncomparative, interventional case series and literature review. patients: All patients with this condition treated at the singapore National eye Centre from 1994 through 2001. INTERVENTIONS: Core or complete vitrectomy and intravitreal and systemic antibiotics. methods: A review of the systemic and ocular characteristics and treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Visual outcome. RESULTS: Group B streptococcus endogenous endophthalmitis developed in four patients after the onset of septic arthritis and in one patient with cervical epidural abscess after acupuncture, presenting as a diffuse endophthalmitis. Group B streptococcus was isolated in the blood, vitreous, and joints. Despite the use of high-dose intravenous antibiotics within 72 hours of ocular presentation, intravitreal antibiotic injection, and vitrectomy (two eyes), all eyes lost light perception and became phthisical. A survey of the literature revealed that GBSEE is rare and that 17 cases have been reported since 1985. For purposes of analysis, four of these cases were excluded because of inadequate details and our five cases were included. Group B streptococcus endogenous endophthalmitis was found to arise from hematogenous spread from cutaneous sites of infection (16.7%), pharyngitis (11.1%), and pneumonia (11.1%). Septic arthritis (38.9%) and endocarditis (33.3%) were concomitant sites of infection along with endophthalmitis. The septic arthritis typically involved multiple joints. Four patients (22.2%) had diabetes mellitus and three had other underlying predisposing illness. Although most patients received intravenous (83.3%) and intravitreal (55.6%) antibiotics and four eyes underwent therapeutic vitrectomy, useful vision was preserved in only four eyes. Two patients died of sepsis. CONCLUSIONS: Group B streptococcus endogenous endophthalmitis is a devastating condition often associated with septic arthritis. The visual prognosis is poor, despite therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/18. Infected left atrial myxoma.

    A 47-year-old Japanese woman with a continuing high fever was promptly diagnosed as having infected atrial myxoma one day after admission based on transthoracic echocardiographic findings and positivity for bacteria in blood culture. The mass was removed by an urgent open heart surgery. Histopathological examination confirmed that this mass was a myxoma with gram-positive bacterial colonies. Generally, antemortem diagnosis is difficult and there is a high mortality of patients with infected myxoma; however, this patient completely recovered from the illness because of the prompt diagnosis. This is the 37th case of definite infected myxoma reported in the literature. The cause of infection of this patient might have been the acupuncture therapy she underwent for weight reduction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/18. Post-dural puncture bacterial meningitis.

    A fatal case of viridans streptococcus meningitis is reported, which occurred as a complication of epidural anesthesia. One hundred seventy-nine reported cases of post-dural puncture meningitis are reviewed. Evidence suggests that most cases are probably caused by contamination of the puncture site by aerosolized mouth commensals from medical personnel, some are caused from contamination by skin bacteria, and, less frequently, other cases are caused directly or hematogenously by spread from an endogenous infectious site. Controversy exists regarding prevention, surveillance, incidence, and treatment of this serious complication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/18. Enterococcal meningitis in an hiv positive haemophilic patient.

    A 25 year old, human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) seropositive, severe haemophilic patient was treated for suspected pneumocystis carinii infection with high dose intravenous cotrimoxazole and subsequently with prednisolone. When he improved he was discharged on oral treatment only to return two days later, extremely unwell, with headaches, fever, sweats, tachycardia and hypotension. A lumbar puncture showed modest neutrophil pleocytosis but despite empirical antibiotic treatment with intravenous benzylpenicillin and cefuroxime he continued to deteriorate. culture of cerebrospinal fluid subsequently grew enterococcus faecalis that was resistant to trimethoprim and sensitive to ampicillin, rifampicin, and vancomycin. After a change in treatment to intravenous ampicillin and rifampicin he dramatically improved. Enterococcal meningitis is rare in adults but important to recognise and treat appropriately in view of its high mortality and relative resistance to antibiotics. In our case the combination of hiv infection and previous treatment with antibiotics or steroids, or both, were probable predisposing factors.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/18. Group B streptococcal sepsis and death in utero following funipuncture.

    The technique of umbilical cord puncture for diagnosis and therapy, which has been shown to be feasible and relatively safe for both mother and fetus, is being used increasingly. The fetal loss rate with this technique has been estimated to be approximately 1%. A case is presented of fetal death from group B beta-streptococcal sepsis after funipuncture, the first report of this complication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/18. Septic arthritis of the hip: a rare complication of angiography.

    Local infection at the puncture site following percutaneous angiography has been reported as exceedingly rare. We describe the first patient with documented septic arthritis of the hip following percutaneous transfemoral arteriography. Radiologists should be aware of this potentially serious complication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Streptococcal Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.