Cases reported "Streptococcal Infections"

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11/61. cerium nitrate: a new topical antiseptic for extensive burns.

    The wounds of 60 burned patients were treated topically with cerium nitrate, which was applied either as a cream or in aqueous solution. cerium nitrate has a potent antiseptic effect in human burn wounds, especially against gram negative bacteria and fungi. pseudomonas aeruginosa was recovered from the wounds infrequently and never predominated. fungi were practically never found. No patient treated with cerium developed a necrotizing wound infection. Analysis of the detailed bacteriological data indicated that, in contrast to previous results with use of the nitrate or sulfadiazine salts of silver, when gram negative species predominated, the flora tended to be predominantly gram positive when cerium was used. Therefore, some patients were treated simultaneously with cerium nitrate and silver sulfadiazine; this resulted in an even more efficient suppression of the wound flora than was observed previously with either cerium alone or silver salts alone; results with the simultaneous topical therapy in patients with injuries that previously were uniformly lethal were excellent. No toxicity attributable to the use of cerium was observed, although one instance of methemoglobinemia due to nitrate was documented. The adsorption of topically applied cerium essentially is nil. The use of cerium nitrate was associated with a nearly 50 percent reduction in the anticipated death rate. cerium nitrate is a promising new topical antiseptic agent for the treatment of burns, particularly when it is used in combination with silver sulfadiazine.
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keywords = wound infection, wound
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12/61. groin infection following cardiac catheterization: a case report.

    A 56 year old female with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus developed a severe wound infection after a cardiac catherization. The clinical features and treatment of progressive bacterial synergistic gangrene and necrotizing fasciitis are discussed.
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ranking = 0.91831366045312
keywords = wound infection, wound
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13/61. High-level fluoroquinolone resistance in a clinical Streptoccoccus pyogenes isolate in germany.

    An isolate of streptococcus pyogenes isolated from a 63-year-old woman with a serious wound infection was found to be highly resistant to fluoroquinolones (levofloxacin MIC > or = 32 mg/L). dna amplification and sequencing revealed a serine-81 to phenylalanine substitution in gyrA and three substitutions in parC: serine-79 to phenylalanine, aspartic acid-91 to asparagine, and serine-140 to proline. To our knowledge, this is the first report from a European country of a clinical isolate of S. pyogenes with high-level fluoroquinolone resistance.
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ranking = 0.91831366045312
keywords = wound infection, wound
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14/61. life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis of the neck: an unusual consequence of a sore throat.

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is life-threatening bacterial infection which spreads with frightening speed along the fascial planes resulting in extensive tissue necrosis and often death. The infection is caused by either Group A streptococci or a combination of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is rare and commonly has a dental origin. CASE REPORT: Here we present a unique case of the condition that was preceded by a sore throat in a young immunocompetent woman. We also describe, for the first time, a successful outcome involving primary skin closure and daily irrigation of the wound with hydrogen peroxide.
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ranking = 0.02042158488672
keywords = wound
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15/61. Successful treatment of infected vascular prosthetic grafts in the groin using conservative therapy with povidone-iodine solution.

    Four cases of infected vascular prosthetic graft in the groin successfully treated with povidone-iodine solution using a conservative approach are described here. In all patients the same technique was used. After complete debridement, the prosthetic graft in the groin was completely exposed. The wound was cleansed with hydrogen peroxide and then dressed with gauze soaked in 1:10 sterile water-diluted povidone-iodine solution. The dressings were changed twice a day. The patients were supplemented by systemic therapy of an appropriate antibiotic. All patients were observed in the intensive care unit. In all patients this treatment method led to control of infection and healing of the wound. Thus, it was not necessary to remove the prosthetic graft and patients were spared a major surgical intervention. At follow-up, the prosthetic grafts remain patent without any signs of recurrence of infection.
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ranking = 0.04084316977344
keywords = wound
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16/61. Craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin with mediastinal extension.

    We review an interesting case of craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis with thoracic extension in an immunocompetent 44-year-old man. The patient underwent aggressive medical and surgical management during a long hospitalization. Multiple surgical debridements, including transcervical mediastinal debridement, and eventually a thoracotomy for mediastinal abscess were required. The patient eventually recovered, and 3 months later he showed no sign of complications or recurrence. Craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant soft-tissue infection, usually of odontogenic origin, that requires prompt identification and treatment to ensure survival. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, aggressive surgical debridement and wound care, hyperbaric oxygen, and good intensive care are the mainstays of treatment.
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ranking = 0.02042158488672
keywords = wound
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17/61. Necrotizing fasciitis of the eyelids.

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a destructive soft tissue infection that rarely involves the eyelids. Three cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the eyelids are described. Necrotizing fasciitis was preceded by minor forehead soft tissue trauma in two cases and occurred spontaneously in one. In two patients necrotizing fasciitis was bilateral and involved both the upper and lower eyelids. review of these cases, in addition to 18 cases previously reported in the English literature, reveals a predominance in females, preceding minor local soft tissue trauma, frequent bilateral involvement, and an association with alcohol abuse and diabetes. In all of the patients, group A beta-hemolytic streptococci were cultured from the wound. Early recognition of the disease process, prompt surgical debridement of the necrotic tissue, aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and delayed skin grafting combine to minimize morbidity.
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ranking = 0.02042158488672
keywords = wound
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18/61. Unusual presentation of necrotizing fasciitis in a patient who had achieved long-term remission after irradiation for testicular cancer.

    We report a case of a 60-year-old man with necrotizing fasciitis complicated by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The patient had received high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the pelvis for relapsed seminoma 7 years previously. He had been in long-term remission. He was admitted to the Tsukuba University Hospital, Tsukuba-City, Ibaraki, japan, with complaints of fever and localized erythema over the foreskin. The patient suffered from septic shock and multiple organ failure. Despite intensive care, he died 18 h after admission. streptococcus pyogenes was isolated from both the wound and blood culture. To our knowledge, this is the first description of necrotizing fasciitis primarily affecting the penile skin.
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ranking = 0.02042158488672
keywords = wound
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19/61. Streptococcal gangrene of the head and neck: a case report and review of the literature.

    Necrotizing bacterial infections that occur in the head and neck are exceedingly rare and are often associated with a group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (streptococcus pyogenes). The disease is associated with soft tissue necrosis and vascular thrombosis. There appears to be an increasing incidence of hyperaggressive beta hemolytic streptococcal infections associated with high mortality rates. We report the survival of an otherwise healthy patient who developed a flu-like illness followed by a rapidly progressive toxic systemic illness associated with subtotal facial soft tissue necrosis down to bone. The recent literature related to this necrotizing bacterial infection is reviewed. Otolaryngologists must be aware of this entity since survival depends upon aggressive early wound management and high-dose intravenous antibiotics.
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ranking = 0.02042158488672
keywords = wound
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20/61. endophthalmitis after microincision cataract surgery.

    We report the first case of streptococcal endophthalmitis after uneventful right bimanual phacoemulsification. Microincision cataract surgery is perceived to be minimally invasive as smaller wounds are equated to shortened healing time, increased safety, and reduced risk for postoperative endophthalmitis. Recommendations for modifications in wound construction are discussed.
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ranking = 0.04084316977344
keywords = wound
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