Cases reported "Strongylida Infections"

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1/3. Eosinophilic meningitis. An unusual cause of headache.

    Human parasitic infections are uncommon outside the tropical north but common in animals throughout australia. The rat lung worm, angiostrongylus cantonensis, can invade the human brain to cause a chronic meningitis with prolonged headache. This condition can be diagnosed by finding a high eosinophil count in cerebrospinal fluid (CFS), the lumbar puncture also provides symptomatic relief. The outcome is usually benign but death has been reported.
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2/3. Intravitreal angiostrongyliasis: report of 2 cases.

    Two male patients presented with unilateral blurred vision. A small motile worm was found in the vitreous cavity in both cases. In one case, another dead, disintegrated worm was noted in the inferior portion of the vitreous cavity. On each eye, vitreous surgery was performed and the worm was removed by an aspirator. Both worms were identified as angiostrongylus cantonensis. Since both patients had no signs of meningitis, lumbar puncture was not done. Long-term follow-up confirmed the benefit and safety of the vitreous surgery. fluorescein angiography revealed severe pigmentary alteration, probably from inflammation of the choroid and retina due to subretinal migration of the worm prior to access into the vitreous cavity.
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3/3. Elsberg syndrome with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a history of fever, headache and disorientation. His cerebrospinal fluid revealed eosinophilia and his serum had an antibody against angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis). Then, he was diagnosed as eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by A. cantonensis. He was treated with repeated lumbar punctures and oral prednisolone. Although a symptom he had been suffering from at the time of his admission was urinary retention, this symptom disappeared as his general condition improved. Therefore his case was considered to be Elsberg syndrome with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by A. cantonensis.
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