Cases reported "Strongyloidiasis"

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1/214. A case of strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    strongyloidiasis has been recognized as one of the life-threatening parasitic infections in the immunocompromised patients. We report an intestinal infection case of strongyloides stercoralis in a 61-year-old man. Rhabditiform larvae were detected in the stool examination and developed to filariform larvae having a notched tail through the Harada-Mori filter paper culture. The patient received five courses of albendazole therapy but not cured of strongyloidiasis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = stercoralis
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2/214. strongyloides stercoralis infection presenting as generalized prurigo nodularis and lichen simplex chronicus.

    strongyloides stercoralis is a parasitic nematode that develops an autoinfective life cycle within the gastrointestinal tract of its human host. The infection produces peripheral eosinophilia and cutaneous eruptions, as well as gastrointestinal or respiratory symptoms. Detection of S stercoralis is difficult through stool examination, but may be demonstrated by ELISA for IgG antibody against the parasite. We describe a patient with chronic S stercoralis infection initially presenting with generalized prurigo nodularis and lichen simplex chronicus.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = stercoralis
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3/214. Fatal strongyloidosis following corticosteroid therapy in a patient with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenia.

    A patient with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenia and fatal strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome following prolonged corticosteroid therapy is briefly described. Diagnosis was difficult to perform due to absence of eosinophilia and diarrhea at presentation, as well as to the negativity of multiple stool specimens examined by direct microscopy of saline smear, formol-ether concentration techniques, and Baermann's test. The striking hypoalbuminemia in the setting of the normal results of liver function tests and prothrombin time was assumed to be due to enteropathy. Therefore, an upper endoscopy was undertaken, revealing strongyloides stercoralis (SS) larvae in the biopsy specimens of the gastric and duodenal mucosa. The SS larvae were also demonstrated in the multiple specimens of the concentrated sputum. Despite thiabendazol treatment, death ensued. On autopsy, SS larvae were recovered in the gastrointestinal tract and lungs. The importance of early diagnosis and of ruling out strongyloidosis prior to administration of corticosteroids are discussed, as well as the pathogenetic aspects of strongyloidosis in the patient under corticosteroids.
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ranking = 0.44341844077441
keywords = strongyloides, stercoralis
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4/214. Mistaken diagnosis of eosinophilic colitis.

    A 69-year-old male chronic alcohol abuser suffering from diarrhoea and with a number of discrete pruriginous and erythematous lesions of the trunk was referred to our Unit with a diagnosis of idiopathic eosinophilic colitis in order that we might determine corticosteroid treatment. Diagnosis was based on the presence of marked peripheral eosinophilia and massive eosinophilic infiltration at colonic biopsy, and the exclusion of parasitic infection by means of two different microscopic stool examinations of five samples. However, repeated stool examinations of ten samples collected on separate days and evidence of impaired cell-mediated immunity allowed a definite diagnosis of strongyloides stercoralis autoinfection or hyperinfection. Due to the poor sensitivity of stool examination in the diagnosis of strongyloides stercoralis infection, a careful search for this parasite should be made in all patients with comparable clinical findings before formulating a diagnosis of idiopathic eosinophilic colitis, because consequent steroid treatment may have a fatal outcome by inducing widespread dissemination of the parasite.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = stercoralis
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5/214. Severe strongyloidiasis during interferon plus ribavirin therapy for chronic HCV infection.

    ribavirin is a nucleoside analogue, recently introduced in hepatitis c virus (HCV) therapy, that has postulated immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive action. strongyloidiasis is an helmintic infection caused by strongyloides stercoralis, endemic in tropical countries. Severe strongyloidiasis has been demonstrated after immunosuppression by corticosteroids evolving some fatal cases. Here, we describe two cases of severe strongyloidiasis coincident with ribavirin plus interferon therapy for treating HCV infection. The review of our monotherapy protocol with interferon did not disclose any case of symptomatic strongyloidiasis pointing to a possible role of ribavirin in modifying immune response to S. stercoralis. We propose a careful screening for S. stercoralis before initiating ribavirin therapy or even empiric antihelmintic treatment.
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ranking = 0.6
keywords = stercoralis
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6/214. strongyloides stercoralis: ultrastructural study of newly hatched larvae within human duodenal mucosa.

    AIM: To investigate the ultrastructural features of the newly hatched larvae of strongyloides stercoralis in human duodenal mucosa. methods: Duodenal biopsies from an AIDS patient were studied by transmission electron microscopy to investigate morphology, location, and host-worm relations of newly hatched larvae. RESULTS: Newly hatched larvae were found in the Lieberkuhn crypts within the tunnels formed by migration of parthenogenic females. Delimiting enterocytes were compressed. Release of larvae into the gut lumen was also documented. It was shown that both a thin and a thick membrane surrounded the eggs and larvae, as a tegument derived respectively from parasite and host. Segmentary spike-like waves, caused by contractures of worm body musculature, were observed on the surface of newly hatched larvae, and their intestinal lumen was closed and empty, with no budding microvilli. Immaturity of the cuticle and some degree immaturity of amphidial neurones were found, but there was no evidence of either immaturity or signs of damage to other structures. CONCLUSIONS: Newly hatched larvae of S stercoralis appear to be a non-feeding immature stage capable of active movement through the epithelium, causing mechanical damage. The tegument resulting from the thin and the thick membrane may protect the parasite and reduce any disadvantage caused by immaturity.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = stercoralis
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7/214. Pigmented nails and strongyloides stercoralis infestation causing clinical worsening in a patient treated for immunoproliferative small intestinal disease: two unusual observations.

    immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID) is commonly reported from developing countries with poor socioeconomic conditions, hygiene, and high frequency of gastrointestinal infections and infestations. The disease requires anti-malignant chemotherapy in lymphomatous stage. Reported here is a 20-year old man with IPSID lymphoma who responded to anti-malignant chemotherapy initially, but later deteriorated due to strongyloides stercoralis infestation, which was treated successfully with mebendazole. Importance of an early recognition and adequate treatment for gastrointestinal infections and infestations before anti-malignant chemotherapy for this disease is highlighted considering the occurrence of this disease in the developing world. The patient developed alternate brown black and white lines in the finger nails after combination chemotherapy, which has not been reported earlier in this disease; the nail changes disappeared 6 months after the withdrawal of doxorubicin suggesting this drug as the cause for such nail changes during anti-malignant combination chemotherapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = stercoralis
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8/214. Pulmonary strongyloidiasis--case report of 2 cases.

    strongyloidiasis is a benign gastrointestinal infection. It can pass through the lungs and induce pulmonary strongyloidiasis. The suspicion of pulmonary involvement begins with clinical and chest radiographic features in the patients at risk. They are as follows: chronic lung diseases, age was 65 years, altered cellular immunity, and use of corticosteroids. Definitive diagnosis is made by identification of strongyloides in the secretion or tissue of the respiratory tract. We present 2 patients with pulmonary strongyloidiasis in this research. These 2 cases were patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; both patients were more than 65 years old. They had the risk factors for severe strongyloides infection (advanced age, use of corticosteroids, an high serum cortisol level), worsening of pulmonary symptoms (e.g., dyspnea, cough, sputum production) and abnormal radiographic findings. strongyloides stercoralis was found in the sputum and stool, and pulmonary strongyloidiasis was diagnosed. mebendazole 100 mg twice daily was used and this eliminated the parasite from the stool in case 1, and from the sputum in case 2. Unfortunately, there was a relapse of parasite infection in case 1 and it also induced pulmonary strongyloidiasis. Finally, he died of respiratory failure. Since this disorder has a high relapse rate (15%), serial follow-up of stool and sputum is very important.
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ranking = 0.68683688154882
keywords = strongyloides, stercoralis
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9/214. Transmission of Strongyloides steracolis person to person.

    A case of presumed person-to-person transmission of Strongyloides steracolis is described. The index case was immunocompromised following high dose glucocorticosteroid therapy for myelodysplasia, which resulted in reactivation of latent strongyloides infection with the hyperinfestation syndrome. physicians unfamiliar with this disease should realize that a history of foreign travel is unnecessary to acquire this parasite, and that transmission to persons in close proximity to the index case does occur and warrants treatment.
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ranking = 0.24341844077441
keywords = strongyloides
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10/214. Natural killer-cell lymphocytosis and strongyloides infection.

    We report a case of strongyloides infection in a 72-year-old man presenting with acute angio-oedema and urticaria. He was also found to have natural killer cell (NK) large granular lymphocytosis (LGL). We discuss the possible relationship between the strongyloides infection and the NK-LGL lymphocytosis.
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ranking = 1.4605106446465
keywords = strongyloides
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