Cases reported "Surgical Wound Dehiscence"

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1/6. Late infective endocarditis after cholecystectomy in a patient with repaired tetralogy of fallot: a case report.

    Late endocarditis after surgical repair of tetralogy of fallot is rare. We describe a case of endocarditis following cholecystectomy in a 22-year old patient with repaired tetralogy of fallot. After cholecystectomy, the patient was referred to a cardiology clinic with unexplained fever and suspicion of endocarditis. echocardiography revealed a large mass at the basal level of interventricular septum. endocarditis was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and echocardiographic findings and antibiotic treatment was initiated immediately. Nine days later, the clinical status of the patient deteriorated and urgent surgery was performed. Patch dehiscence which mimicked a large vegetation, and multiple vegetations on the patch were found during operation. The patch was removed and ventricular septum defect was repaired with a new dacron patch. enterobacter agglomerans was isolated in the vegetation cultures.
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2/6. Traumatic late flap dehiscence and enterobacter keratitis following LASIK.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of traumatic flap dehiscence and enterobacter keratitis 34 months after LASIK. methods: A 36-year-old man sustained a flap dehiscence following traumatic right eye gouging by a seagull claw. He presented the following day with uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) in the affected eye of 3/200 and organic foreign body deposits underneath the flap. Systemic and topical antibiotics were administered and urgent surgical debridement and replacement of the LASIK flap was performed. An enterobacter species was cultured from an intraoperative swab. RESULTS: After a prolonged postoperative course, including administration of topical ofloxacin, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, and dexamethasone, UCVA returned to 20/20. CONCLUSIONS: Good visual outcome after early debridement and appropriate antibiotics was achieved. patients should be injury advised to seek prompt ophthalmic consultation after LASIK.
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3/6. Experience with the use of apligraf to heal complicated surgical and nonsurgical wounds in a private practice setting.

    Apligraf is supplied as a ready-to-use living fibroblast and keratinocyte bilayer in culture. This therapy has been shown to facilitate healing of venous ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Several case reports suggest that Apligraf may also be effective in healing acute excisional wounds and complicated surgical defects. Apligraf can, in appropriate settings, be used as an alternative to autografts, avoiding the morbidity of donor site wounds. The present case review summarizes outcomes in 16 patients with 18 complicated surgical and nonsurgical wounds treated with Apligraf, which was meshed or fenestrated as needed to obtain better wound coverage and to allow drainage. Of 16 patients, 15 (94%) experienced complete healing (16 of 18 wounds; 89%). Both surgical and nonsurgical wounds responded well, with healing times ranging from 21 to 550 days. patients generally stated that they were satisfied with their degree of healing and with the opportunity to avoid the surgical procedures associated with autograft donor sites.
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4/6. Treatment of lymphorrhea with exposed or infected vascular prosthetic grafts in the groin using sartorius myoplasty.

    Thirteen myoplasties using the sartorius muscle were performed on 12 patients from 1980 to 1985 for "healing problems" in the groin with subjacent synthetic grafts. Persistant aseptic lymphorrhea was the indication for 4 patients. In 3 other cases, bacterial cultures from the wound were positive. In 2 other patients there was clinical evidence of sepsis with purulent discharge from the wound and an exposed graft. In 3 cases myoplasty was used as a preventive measure after reoperation on patients in poor general condition. Follow-up extends from 3 to 54 months. There was only one recurrence observed at 19 months which was successfully treated by segmental resection of the infected graft and insertion of a new prosthesis through the obturator canal. No recurrence was observed among the other patients as judged by clinical observation and biological tests for inflammation, echotomography, CT scan and indium scintigraphy. The treatment of choice for an infected prosthesis should be removal of the graft and extra-anatomic bypass in the majority of cases. However in some situations, excision of the wound and myoplasty using the sartorius muscle may be of some value and needs further evaluation.
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5/6. pneumothorax and wound dehiscence related to collagenase deregulation: treatment with diphenylhydantoin.

    BACKGROUND. Wound dehiscence is an uncommon complication of operation, usually related to a recognized risk factor. A clinical dilemma arises when dehiscence has no identifiable cause or treatment. methods. We describe the case of a previously healthy 45-year-old man in whom recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces developed followed by multiple dehiscences of thoracotomy, diaphragmatic, and abdominal wounds. Analysis over several years of laboratory investigation of cultured tissue from test incisions was initially unsuccessful. The patient was supported symptomatically until a remarkable laboratory finding enabled us to develop an effective treatment plan. RESULTS. Cultured patient fibroblasts were ultimately found to express abnormally elevated levels of collagenase, which could be inhibited by diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin) in vitro. Treatment of the patient with a course of diphenylhydantoin allowed adequate healing of test incisions and subsequent definitive surgical treatment with successful wound healing. CONCLUSIONS. This report of the rigorous application of the scientific method to the investigation and treatment of an enigmatic case of wound dehiscence might serve as a guide to surgeons faced with similar healing problems.
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6/6. Vascularized muscle flaps and reoperative approach for complicated, dehisced sternal wounds in children.

    Vascularized muscle flaps for treatment of mediastinitis and sternal wound dehiscence have become standard treatment practice, but triple-muscle flap reconstruction is reserved for the more complex wounds. The incisional approach for reoperation in such patients is controversial. We report an extremely ill infant, born at 38 weeks gestational age, who underwent an arterial switch procedure for transposition of the great arteries at 12 days of age. Sternal wound infection, dehiscence, mediastinitis, and extensive wound necrosis complicated the postoperative course. The cultured organism enterobacter is a relatively rare cause for median sternotomy wound infection and was associated with massive postoperative hemorrhage. The infant underwent multiple debridements and at 2 months of age had reconstructive surgery with bilateral pectoralis major muscle advancement flaps combined with a rectus abdominis muscle flap. Three months postreconstruction the infant required reoperation to correct a stenosis at the site of the pulmonary artery anastomosis. This surgery was carried out through the previous median sternotomy scar because it was the safest, most direct approach and would also limit additional scarring. Long-term follow-up at 2 years of age shows a well-developed young boy with no limitations in growth and activity.
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