Cases reported "Surgical Wound Infection"

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1/5. surgical wound infection associated with staphylococcus sciuri.

    We describe a case of surgical wound infection due to staphylococcus sciuri. The isolated strain was susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin and resistant to gentamicin, clindamycin, rifampicin, methicillin, ampicillin and ceftriaxone. The multiresistance of the strain had a serious impact on the prolonged course of the infection. Although this bacterium is principally found in animals, our strain was probably of nosocomial origin.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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2/5. vibrio metschnikovii, a rare cause of wound infection.

    We report the first case of a postoperative wound infection caused by vibrio metschnikovii on the lower right leg of a patient after saphenectomy. Compared to the healing of an uninfected site, that of the right leg was delayed, and a cure was achieved by intensified wound care. Several swabs taken from the infected site grew a gram-negative rod in pure culture that was identified as V. metschnikovii by the VITEK 2 system. The source of the infection was not detected; however, the absence of putative risk factors (exposure to water or shellfish or an episode of diarrhea), the profession of the patient (butcher), and the isolation of V. metschnikovii in a variety of farm animals (chicken, cattle, swine, and horses) suggest that infections caused by V. metschnikovii may be regarded as zoonotic.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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3/5. Bilateral prosthetic knee infection by campylobacter fetus.

    We present the first documented case of a bilateral prosthetic knee joint infection with campylobacter fetus. Our patient's risk factors included age, the presence of prosthetic joints, and potential exposure through his contact with farm animals. It is important to be aware of the possibility of C fetus joint infections in high-risk patients who present with pain after total joint arthroplasty.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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4/5. Utility of the indium 111-labeled human immunoglobulin g scan for the detection of focal vascular graft infection.

    The ability to diagnose and localize vascular graft infections has been a major challenge. Recent studies in animal models and humans with focal bacterial infection have shown that radiolabeled, polyclonal, human immunoglobulin g accumulates at the site of inflammation and can serve as the basis for an imaging technique. This study investigated this new technique for the diagnosis and localization of vascular graft infections. Twenty-five patients with suspected vascular infections involving grafts (22), atherosclerotic aneurysms (2), and subclavian vein thrombophlebitis (1) were studied. Gamma camera images of the suspected area were obtained between 5 and 48 hours after intravenous administration of 1.5 to 2.0 mCi (56 to 74 mBq) of indium 111-labeled, human, polyclonal immunoglobulin g. Scan results were interpreted without clinical information about the patient and were subsequently correlated with surgical findings, other imaging modalities, and/or clinical follow-up. In 10 of 10 patients found to have positive scan results, localized infections were confirmed at the involved sites. In 14 of 15 patients whose scan results were interpreted as negative, no vascular infections were identified at follow-up. The patient with false-negative results and recurrent bacteremia from an aortoduodenal fistula was found to have a negative scan outcome at a time when his disease was quiescent. These data suggest that nonspecific, human, indium 111-labeled immunoglobulin g scanning can be a useful noninvasive means of localizing vascular infections.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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5/5. pasteurella infections of the head and neck.

    Infections caused by Pasteurella occur most frequently after domestic animal bites or scratches and in individuals with agricultural or veterinary contact with animals. A serious Pasteurella infection developed in an agricultural worker following tumor extirpation of a head and neck neoplasm. review of pasteurella infections in humans disclosed that 31 of 446 reported infections involved head and neck structures. The most serious of these involved the adjacent central nervous system. Surgical drainage combined with parenteral penicillin remains the treatment of choice in these infections. aminoglycosides are not effective in treating this organism.
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ranking = 2
keywords = animal
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