Cases reported "Surgical Wound Infection"

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1/80. Cardiocutaneous fistula.

    Infection of the Teflon pledgets on the heart suture line after left ventricular aneurysm repair, presenting late with a fistulous tract connecting the heart with the skin (cardiocutaneous fistula) is an uncommon but potentially serious condition. The case is reported of a 73 year old man who developed a cardiocutaneous fistula extending through the left hemidiaphragm and draining at the abdominal wall, which developed six years after left ventricular aneurysmectomy. Following radiographic evaluation, which established the diagnosis, the Teflon pledgets and fistulous tract were successfully surgically removed. Prompt diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion. Eradication of infection requires excision of infected material, which must be planned on an individual basis.
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2/80. Pseudoaneurysm of the superficial femoral artery following accidental trauma: result of treatment by percutaneous stent-graft placement.

    Accidental trauma frequently involves the extremities, and can extend to involve their blood supply, causing exsanguinating hemorrhage and pseudoaneurysm in the involved blood vessel. This is traditionally managed by surgical repair. We report a case in which control of life-threatening hemorrhage and exclusion of a large, post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm in the superficial femoral artery was performed by a commercially available stent-graft, without complication. This treatment method may be a safe and effective alternative to surgery in selected patients.
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keywords = dental
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3/80. Bronchial-atrial fistula after lung transplant resulting in fatal air embolism.

    We describe a rare case of fatal air embolism in a patient in whom a left atrial-bronchial fistula developed 1 month after single lung transplant. The cause was a combination of mediastinal infection and bronchial necrosis.
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4/80. Intrathoracic application of the reverse latissimus dorsi muscle flap.

    The use of the reverse latissimus dorsi muscle flap based on its paraspinous perforators for posterior trunk wound coverage has been described previously. However, few studies have reported its intrathoracic application. In this study the authors present their experience in treating 3 patients with various intrathoracic defects using the reverse latissimus dorsi muscle flap. There were 1 male and 2 female patients who ranged in age from 4 to 74 years (mean, 49 years). The etiology included an infected aortic graft, a bronchopleural fistula, and a recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 24 months. Successful outcomes were achieved in all 3 patients, and there was no recurrence or wound complication identified. Their results demonstrate the versatility and reliability of the reverse latissimus dorsi muscle flap in treating low posterior intrathoracic defects.
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keywords = fistula
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5/80. Transthoracic fistula with erosion of the ascending aorta along an IMA-protecting graft.

    Internal mammary artery (IMA) graft protection with nonbiodegradable material, such as polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is recognized as an effective means for preventing overexuberant adhesion development as well as injury of retrosternally crossing arterial grafts in the event of resternotomy and should enable better identification of the IMA graft. It is still uncertain whether the use of PTFE material is suitable for diabetic patients with complete arterial revascularization due to potential infectious complications. We report on a young diabetic patient after arterial T-grafting due to severe coronary disease and readmission with wound infection and retrosternal fistula formation 8 months after operation.
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keywords = fistula
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6/80. Congenital neutropenia. Report of a case and a biorationale for dental management.

    Congenital neutropenia is characterized by a marked decrease in or lack of circulating PMN's in children with no prior history of drug intake. The neutropenia is persistent and the clinical course is one of early onset of severe, recurrent, and eventually fatal infections. bone marrow studies show a maturation arrest of neutrophilic precursors. Because of their greatly increased susceptibility to infection, patients with congenital neutropenia present a difficult dental management problem. A case of congenital neutropenia has been presented, as well as a biorationale for dental treatment. On the basis of reports in the literature, the following recommendations for the management of patients with congenital neutropenia are made: 1. The prevention and control of infection and the interception of dental disease before surgical intervention becomes necessary should be the overriding considerations in the management of patients with congenital neutropenia. 2. The carious breakdown of teeth should be prevented by the daily application of a 0.4 per cent stannous fluoride gel in addition to oral hygiene and limitation of sucrose intake. 3. Periodontal therapy should be palliative only, since alveolar bone loss is progressive despite frequent oral hygiene instruction and prophylaxis. The goal of periodontal therapy for patients with congenital neutropenia should therefore be a decrease in gingival inflammation to make the patient's mouth more comfortable and to slow down alveolar bone loss. Periodontal surgery is contraindicated. 4. bacteremia and subsequent septicemia should be prevented since a minor infection can become life threatening in patients with congenital neutropenia. The patient should rinse for 30 seconds and the gingival sulci should be irrigated with a phenolated antiseptic mouthwash prior to all dental manipulations of the soft tissue. This will significantly reduce the incidence of bacteremia. 5. Surgery should be avoided if at all possible because of the high risk of post-operative infection. All surgery sholld be performed in the hospital, and the patient should be given antibiotics as determined by his physician. Primary closure should be done with fine polyglycolic acid sutures to reduce the chance of infection. If postoperative infection can be prevented, wound healing will progress normally despite the complete absence of PMN's.
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ranking = 0.044701875513147
keywords = gingival, dental
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7/80. Persistent wound infection after herniotomy associated with small-colony variants of staphylococcus aureus.

    A small-colony variant (SCV) of staphylococcus aureus was cultured from a patient with a persistent wound infection (abscess and fistula) 13 months after herniotomy. The strain was nonhemolytic, nonpigmented and grew only anaerobically on Schaedler agar. As it was coagulase-negative, it was initially misidentified as a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. In further analysis, however, the microorganism was shown to be an auxotroph that reverted to normal growth and morphology in the presence of menadione and hemin (Schaedler agar) and could be identified as a SCV of staphylococcus aureus. Surgery and antibiotic treatment of the patient with flucloxacillin and rifampicin for 4 weeks resulted in healing of the chronic wound infection.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = fistula
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8/80. Gracilis transposition in complicated perianal fistula and unhealed perineal wounds in Crohn's disease.

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of transposition of gracilis muscle in the treatment of chronic recurrent fistulas and unhealed perineal wounds after proctectomy in patients with Crohn's disease. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Academic clinic, united states. SUBJECTS: 7 patients with Crohn's disease: 3 had unhealed perineal wounds and persistent sinuses; 2 had had several attempts to repair rectovaginal fistulas; 1 had a rectourethral fistula; and 1 a pouch vaginal fistula. INTERVENTION: Transposition of the gracilis muscle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Healing. RESULTS: Mean follow up was 18 months (range 3-30). All patients operated on for unhealed perineal wounds had healed completely within 3-6 months. The patients with a rectovaginal fistula and a rectourethral fistula had both healed by 1 month postoperatively. Two fistulas recurred, and the small pouch-vaginal fistula remained but was asymptomatic. CONCLUSIONS: Transposition of the gracilis is a viable option for the treatment of persistent sinus and unhealed perineal wound after proctectomy for Crohn's disease. It could also be an option before proctectomy for patients with other types of Crohn's-related or complicated fistulas for whom other treatments have failed. A larger series will be required before a definite conclusion can be drawn.
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ranking = 2.1666666666667
keywords = fistula
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9/80. Endovascular repair of a presumed aortoenteric fistula: late failure due to recurrent infection.

    PURPOSE: To describe a case of presumed aortoduodenal fistula that was treated by endovascular implantation of a stent-graft. methods AND RESULTS: A 76-year-old man was transferred from another hospital where he had been treated for upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a 2-month period. Ten years previously, he had undergone aortobifemoral bypass, the right limb of which recently thrombosed. At the time of transfer, computed tomographic scanning showed a large false aneurysm between the aorta and the duodenum. endoscopy disclosed mucosal erosions in the fourth portion of the duodenum. Following implantation of 2 overlapping stent-grafts, the bleeding ceased and the false aneurysm disappeared. At no time did the patient have a fever. The patient initially did well, but 8 months after treatment, he presented with fever and chills. Recurrent infection had caused erosion of the aorta so that a large portion of the stent-graft was visible from the duodenum. The infected graft and stent-grafts were removed in a two-part operation, from which the patient recovered satisfactorily. CONCLUSIONS: Endovascular stent-grafts may have a role to play in the management of aortoduodenal fistula, if only as a temporary measure to control bleeding.
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keywords = fistula
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10/80. mycobacterium chelonae conjunctivitis and scleritis following vitrectomy.

    The atypical, or nontuberculous, mycobacteria are opportunistic pathogens that usually cause infection following accidental trauma or surgery. These organisms are ubiquitous in nature but have been found with increasing frequency in other environments that include medical offices and surgical suites. Management of atypical mycobacterial ocular infections can be difficult because in vitro antibiotic activity does not always correlate with in vivo efficacy and because normal immune defenses against mycobacteria may work too slowly to prevent irreversible damage to infected ocular tissues. This report describes a patient who developed a severe ocular infection due to mycobacterium chelonae after vitrectomy. Despite eradication of the infection, the eye became blind and painful. Arch Ophthalmol. 2000;118:1125-1128
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ranking = 0.003966849278598
keywords = dental
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