Cases reported "Surgical Wound Infection"

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1/8. Infectious complications related to the use of the angio-seal hemostatic puncture closure device.

    One hundred and eight coronary angiography procedures in which the Angio-Seal device was utilized were complicated by eight (7.4%) hematomas, of which two (1.9%) subsequently developed infection (staphylococcus aureus endarteritis and S. aureus septic hematoma). The Angio-Seal device may be a risk factor for infection for two reasons: excessive hematoma formation (a known risk factor for endarteritis), and foreign material remaining within the arterial lumen and wall, thereby creating a nidus for infection.
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2/8. infection is an unusual but serious complication of a femoral artery catheterization site closure device.

    Percutaneous devices have been developed to close the femoral artery puncture site after catheterization. Because direct compression is not needed, the devices save time for the treating health-care provider, reduce patient discomfort, and obviate the need for post-catheterization bed rest. Reported complications with use of these devices are similar in nature and frequency to those accompanying direct compression. Complications of infection requiring surgical treatment are exceedingly rare with use of these devices. We describe a series of five catheterization site infections occurring among 1807 patients (0.3%) whose femoral artery puncture was closed with a percutaneous suture closure device. All patients required operative intervention and there was one late death. physicians should be aware of this uncommon but serious complication to expedite evaluation and treatment of patients with suspected infections from these devices.
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3/8. Arterial infection and staphylococcus aureus bacteremia after transfemoral cannulation for percutaneous carotid angioplasty and stenting.

    In this report, we present a patient who developed an infected femoral artery after repuncture cannulation for carotid angioplasty and intraluminal stenting. The case was complicated by persistent bacteremia and a delay in diagnosis before it was managed successfully with an autogenous replacement graft and appropriate antibiotics. Overt stent infection is exceedingly rare, but according to the literature describing transfemoral coronary artery intervention, the spectrum of clinical syndromes related to infection of the arterial puncture site includes local invasion, pseudoaneurysm formation, septic embolization to the distal limb, and bacteremia. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and is often delayed. Although the incidence of infectious complications reported for percutaneous intra-arterial interventions historically has been low, the absolute number of these complications almost certainly will increase in the future because of the expanding array of interventional procedures that is becoming available.
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4/8. groin infection caused by a percutaneous femoral artery closure device: report of a case.

    hemostasis after femoral artery catheterization is generally achieved by manual compression, which results in a low incidence of infection at the puncture site. Percutaneous femoral artery closure devices have recently been used to prevent bleeding complications, shorten the hospital stay, and reduce the patient's discomfort. However, they have been associated with infectious complications, necessitating surgical intervention, such as patch angioplasty or arterial bypass; the treatment depending on the damage to the artery and the type of device used. Thus, the possibility of infection should be kept in mind when employing these devices. We report a case of groin infection associated with one such device, known as "The Closer," which was successfully treated by drainage and removal of the suture material.
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5/8. Accidental intrathecal mercury application.

    The authors present a case of accidental intrathecal mercury application. A 69-year-old white woman was admitted to our department with suspected meningitis following surgery for spinal stenosis at another hospital. Postoperatively, she had developed a cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) fistula with a subcutaneous cavity. Local wound irritation had been suspected and, unfortunately, mercury-containing disinfectant was injected into the cavity. Within 24 h the patient demonstrated acute neurological deterioration due to meningitis and encephalitis and was admitted to our clinic with suspected meningitis due to postoperative CSF fistula. Lumbar puncture revealed desinfectant-stained, non-bloody CSF, while lumbar MRI demonstrated the large lumbar subcutaneous cavity. Additionally, CSF fistula was visualized on MRI. Laboratory examination revealed extremely high mercury levels in CSF, blood and urine. Treatment consisted in insertion of a lumbar drainage to wash out the mercury. The patient underwent medical detoxication using chelating agents (DMPS: RS-2,3-dimercapto-1-propansulfonacid, DMSA: meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinatacid). Surgery was performed in order to close the cavity and the fistula. Postoperatively, the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit and remained intubated for 3 days. Within 4 weeks after surgery, she demonstrated good recovery. Eighteen months after intoxication, polyneuropathy and slight neuropsychological deficiencies were detectable.
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6/8. First identification of clostridium celerecrescens in liquid drained from an abscess.

    We present the first report on the characterization of clostridium celerecrescens isolated from liquid drained via abscess puncture from a 45-year-old man. The organism was identified by sequence comparison of 16S rRNA genes.
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7/8. Bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip. diagnosis using arthrography and CT.

    Bursae or abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint were demonstrated by hip arthrography or by computed tomography (CT) in 40 cases. The bursae or abscess cavities were associated with underlying abnormalities in the hip, including painful hip prostheses, infection, and inflammatory or degenerative arthritis. Structures communicating with the joint capsule included iliopsoas bursae (13 cases), bursae associated with the greater trochanter (21 cases), ischiotrochanteric bursae created by abnormal articulation between the ischium and lesser trochanter (two cases), and abscess cavities not associated with a bursa (four cases). Symptoms may be produced directly as a result of infection or indirectly as a result of inflammation or pressure on adjacent structures. In cases of suspected infection, direct puncture and aspiration of the bursa or abscess cavity, in addition to joint aspiration, may be necessary to obtain organisms for culture as joint aspiration may not yield fluid. Hip arthrography can confirm a diagnosis of bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint in patients with hip pain or soft-tissue masses around the groin. Differentiation of enlarged bursae from other abnormalities is important to avoid unnecessary or incorrect surgery.
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8/8. meningitis due to xanthomonas maltophilia.

    During 1st week of post-operative period, a 28 year old female patient operated for left cerebellopontine angle tumor, continued to get fever. Lumbar puncture did not reveal any organisms. She responded to ciprofloxacin. Two months later, she was readmitted with signs and symptoms of meningitis. The CSF tapped on lumbar puncture grew xanthomonas maltophilia, Gram negative bacilli, sensitive to various antibiotics, ciprofloxacin being one of them. The patient was given ciprofloxacin for 3 weeks. On follow up, a year later she was found to be asymptomatic.
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