Cases reported "Sweating, Gustatory"

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1/22. Atypical Frey syndrome as a complication of Obwegeser osteotomy.

    A patient with Frey syndrome on the left cheek area as a complication of an Obwegeser osteotomy is reported. flushing, sweating of skin, and hypoesthesia of buccal mucosae were present 6 months after surgery. An injury to the auriculotemporal nerve during desperiostization of the posterior border of the mandibular ramus is believed to be the principal cause. The physiopathologic mechanism is thought to occur in relation to aberrant regeneration of the postganglionic secretomotor parasympathetic nerve fibers carried in this nerve. These regenerated fibers erroneously reach the sweat glands of the cheek skin through anastomosis with the buccal nerve and temporofacial ramus of the facial nerve. Direct injury of the buccal nerve may be another cause, because of its close anatomic course with the external pterygoid muscle and the mandibular ramus. An extensive literature review revealed no cases of this syndrome as a complication of Obwegeser osteotomy.
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2/22. Frey syndrome: treatment with temporoparietal fascia flap interposition.

    There is a 10% to 48% reported incidence of clinically significant gustatory sweating after parotid surgery or injury. Various medical and surgical treatments have been used in the attempt to treat this socially embarrassing condition. These treatments are not always effective and often have unwanted risks and adverse effects. They also do not address the post-parotidectomy defect. Prevention of Frey syndrome and correction of the postoperative contour deformity after parotidectomy have recently been achieved by interposition of temporoparietal fascia flap between the parotid gland and the cheek skin flap at the time of parotidectomy. This article presents the first report (to our knowledge) of an established case of Frey syndrome being treated with temporoparietal fascia flap interposition.
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3/22. Gustatory sweating syndrome of the submandibular gland.

    Gustatory sweating syndrome involving the submandibular gland is rare. We present a case of a patient who experienced this syndrome 5 years after undergoing submandibular gland resection. Our patient was satisfied simply with an explanation of the disorder and reassurance. But in cases where further intervention is sought, medical and surgical options are available and should be individualized for the patient.
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keywords = submandibular gland, submandibular, gland
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4/22. Malignant pheochromocytoma lacking clinical features of catecholamine excess until the late stage.

    A malignant pheochromocytoma is described in a 71-year-old man. Osseous metastases became manifest 12 years after successful removal of the primary tumor which originated in paraganglionic tissue near the right adrenal gland. Although the patient had no symptoms of catecholamine excess initially, hypertension, tachycardia and excessive sweating appeared several months before his death, concomitantly with a sharp increase in noradrenaline secretion due to an accelerated growth of metastatic tumors. Since there is no histologic criterion of malignancy in this neoplasm, it would be prudent to consider every case of pheochromocytoma as potentially malignant and to follow-up carefully for a long time after removal of the primary tumor.
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5/22. Frey syndrome--delayed clinical onset: a case report.

    Frey syndrome is a disorder characterized by unilateral sweating and flushing of the facial skin in the area of the parotid gland occurring during meals. The syndrome is a sequela of parotidectomy and may follow other surgical, traumatic, and inflammatory injuries of the parotid and submandibular glands and the cervical and upper thoracic portions of the sympathetic trunk. Pathogenesis is based on regeneration of sectioned parasympathetic fibers with inappropriate innervation of cutaneous sweat glands. Various studies have reported the clinical incidence of Frey syndrome after parotidectomy to be as high as 53%. The reported incidence of Frey syndrome in patients not undergoing intraoperative preventive measures is 96% in patients evaluated by means of an iodine-starch test 12 months postoperatively. We present a case in which a patient developed symptoms of Frey syndrome 8(1/2) years after superficial parotidectomy. Although most patients with Frey syndrome have only mild-to-moderate symptoms (only 6% of patients experience severe symptoms), the potential for appearance of Frey syndrome years after the parotidectomy must be discussed with the patient before surgery in the parotid region.
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keywords = submandibular gland, submandibular, gland
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6/22. Botulinum toxin for treatment of Frey's syndrome: report of two cases.

    Frey's syndrome is a phenomenon of hemifacial flushing and sweating after gustatory stimulus, usually secondary to surgical trauma over the parotid gland, although other injury mechanisms may be seen. It is accepted as a result of aberrant regeneration of facial autonomic nerve fibers. Treatment evolved from ineffective medical and surgical approaches to botulinum toxin. We evaluate the effectiveness and safety of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this complication in two patients.
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7/22. Frey's syndrome.

    Frey's syndrome occurs after parotid gland surgery or injury to the parotid gland and is characterized by gustatory sweating and erythema of the face upon mastication. The syndrome occurs in 50 to 60 per cent of all patients undergoing parotid surgery but the symptoms are only distressing to about 10 per cent of patients undergoing parotidectomy. A case of Frey's syndrome is reported The patient obtained good relief of symptoms with scopolamine cream and atropine cream. Other methods of therapy are discussed along with their limitations. Noninvasive therapy with topical anticholinergic creams is effective and seems appropriate in the control of gustatory sweating.
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8/22. Painful sweating.

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a case of spontaneous and gustatory facial pain and sweating. methods: The patient had frequent episodes of pain, sweating, and flushing bilaterally in the hairless skin of the ophthalmic and maxillary distributions of the trigeminal nerve. Gustatory stimuli (e.g., orange juice, pickled onions) reliably evoked episodes, but episodes also frequently came on spontaneously. The problem had begun during adolescence, about the time of topical treatment and then electrocauteries for facial warts. The patient reported benefit from tricyclic antidepressants, guanethidine, and trospium chloride (an anti-cholinergic quaternary amine used in europe for urinary urgency). There was no pain or excessive sweating in other body areas, nor pain with exercise. RESULTS: Administration of edrophonium IV evoked pain and sweating, and ganglion blockade by IV trimethaphan eliminated pain and sweating and markedly attenuated responses to edrophonium. Trospium chloride also prevented edrophonium-induced pain and sweating. Bicycle exercise produced the same increment in forehead humidity as in a spontaneous episode but did not evoke pain. tyramine infusion did not bring on pain or sweating, whereas iontophoretic acetylcholine administration to one cheek evoked pain and sweating bilaterally. Topical glycopyrrolate cream eliminated spontaneous, gustatory, and edrophonium-induced episodes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that facial pain and sweating can result from occupation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors after acetylcholine release from local nerves. The authors propose that after destruction of cutaneous nerves, aberrant regenerant sprouting innervates sweat glands, producing gustatory sweating as in auriculotemporal syndrome (Frey syndrome), and innervates nociceptors, producing pain.
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9/22. Treatment of gustatory sweating with low-dose botulinum toxin A: a case report.

    Frey's syndrome, gustatory sweating in the preauricular area, is an unpleasant phenomenon occurring during meals after surgery on the parotid gland. Recently, botulinum toxin A (BTX) has been shown to reduce the symptoms, but the variation in the reported doses is large. OBJECTIVE: To quantify the effect of treatment with low-dose BTX in a case of Frey's syndrome over a period of 6 months. MATERIAL AND methods: A 56-year-old woman was treated with 10 U Botox given as 20 single, intracutaneous injections of 0.5 U, one for each cm(2), 3 years after resection of the parotid gland. Before treatment and repeatedly during the 6-month period, the sweating was rated subjectively on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) and by a severity index, and objectively by assessment of the extent of the involved skin area using Minor's iodine-starch test, staining the area of sweating dark. RESULTS: The treatment decreased the involved area from 20 to 5 cm(2) and the VAS ratings from 98 to 8 mm. The index showed that treatment affected the sweating intensity, not the frequency. After the 6-month period the patient was still satisfied, but the involved skin area had increased; however, not entirely to pretreatment values. CONCLUSIONS: The effect of BTX injections for gustatory sweating obtained in this case was comparable to results reported using higher doses. Low doses of BTX can therefore be used in the treatment of Frey's syndrome, but studies to clarify the dose-response relationship, in terms of both time-course and obtained effect, are needed.
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10/22. Gustatory sweating following submandibular gland excision.

    A case of gustatory sweating and abnormal skin wrinkling following excision of the submandibular gland is described. The possible aetiology and treatment are outlined.
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ranking = 399.36720896813
keywords = submandibular gland, submandibular, gland
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