Cases reported "Swine Diseases"

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1/7. streptococcus suis meningitis, a poacher's risk.

    streptococcus suis infection is a zoonosis that has been mainly reported in pig-rearing and pork-consuming countries. The most common disease manifestation is meningitis, often associated with cochleovestibular signs. The causative agent is streptococcus suis serotype 2, found as a commensal in the tonsils of its natural host, the pig. persons at risk are mostly those with an occupational exposure to domestic pigs or their meat products. A case of meningitis caused by streptococcus suis in a poacher who had killed and butchered a wild boar is reported. It appears that wild boar hunters are at additional risk of contracting the disease.
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keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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2/7. Emerging viral infections in australia.

    hendra virus infection should be suspected in someone with close association with horses or bats who presents acutely with pneumonia or encephalitis (potentially after a prolonged incubation period). Australian bat lyssavirus infection should be suspected in a patient with a progressive neurological illness and a history of exposure to a bat. rabies vaccine and immunoglobulin should be strongly considered after a bite, scratch or mucous membrane exposure to a bat. Japanese encephalitis vaccine should be considered for people intending to reside in or visit endemic areas of southern or eastern asia for more than 30 days.
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ranking = 0.00097097030561685
keywords = exposure
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3/7. streptococcus suis meningitis. A severe noncompensated occupational disease.

    meningitis caused by streptococcus suis type 2, a rare disease first recognized in 1968 (108 cases worldwide in 1989), is contracted by occupational exposure to pigs and often results in very severe disabilities (definitive deafness and ataxia in 50% of cases). We report the case of an employee in a rendering plant whose initial symptom was deafness. A detailed analysis of medical and veterinary literature is provided concerning the epidemiology of the disease, the clinical forms in man, bacteriological diagnosis and the role of the pig as healthy carrier. It is recommended that this occupational disease be officially recognized for compensation in france.
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keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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4/7. microsporum nanum infection in hog farmers.

    microsporum nanum is a dermatophyte that can cause disease in both man and animals and is most frequently associated with ringworm infection in pigs. Human infections are rare in the literature. Three new cases of human M. nanum infection are reported here. Two patients had inflammatory tinea faciei and one had tinea cruris. The patients were successfully treated with clotrimazole or miconazole cream, sometimes combined with griseofulvin. All three patients were hog farmers and lived in the same small rural area. occupational exposure is suggested as the cause of infection.
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ranking = 0.00048548515280842
keywords = exposure
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5/7. brucellosis: re-emergence and changing epidemiology in queensland.

    OBJECTIVE: To define the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of human brucellosis, which is being detected in increasing numbers of patients in queensland. DESIGN AND SETTING: Thirty-four cases of brucellosis diagnosed according to standard clinical and microbiological criteria were studied either retrospectively or prospectively over a two-year period from October 1989 to October 1991. RESULTS: Cases were assessed by means of standard laboratory investigations and a questionnaire documenting clinical symptoms, occupation and recreational activities, treatment and response, relapse rate and complications. blood cultures taken from 11 patients were positive for brucella suis; in three others, brucella suis was cultured from other sites. In the 12 months before diagnosis, all affected individuals were involved in the killing and slaughter of feral pigs. Most infections occurred in rural queensland but six were contracted in metropolitan Brisbane from feral pig abattoirs. All patients responded to appropriate antibiotic therapy; the relapse rate was 66% in those treated for less than four weeks. Complications (multiple splenic abscesses, epididymitis, cervical lymphadenitis and septic arthritis) occurred in four patients, who were ill for more than one month before diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: brucellosis due to brucella abortus is a disappearing disease in australia as a result of effective eradication programs in cattle. However, the disease is re-emerging in queensland because of recreational and occupational exposure to feral pigs infected with brucella suis. The population at risk is increasing as the lucrative export industry based on field-shot feral pigs expands.
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keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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6/7. Transmission of swine influenza virus to humans after exposure to experimentally infected pigs.

    Two people developed symptoms of influenza 36 h after collecting nasal swabs from pigs experimentally infected with A/Sw/IN/1726/88 (Sw/IN). Pharyngeal swabs from these persons tested positive for influenza virus rna 8 days after infection. Analysis of hemi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products indicated that the hemagglutinin (HA) segments of the isolates were genetically related to the HA of Sw/IN. Four influenza a virus isolates (A/WI/4754/94, A/WI/4756/94, A/WI/4758/94, A/WI/4760/94) were recovered from a 39-year-old man and 2 (A/WI/4755/94, A/WI/4757/94) from a 31-year-old woman. The HAs of the isolates were antigenically indistinguishable from the virus used to infect the pigs. sequence analysis of the HA genes indicated they were 99.7% identical to the HA of the virus used in the experiment. Multisegment reverse transcription-PCR proved that all of the segments originated from Sw/IN, demonstrating that transmission of swine H1N1 viruses to humans occurs directly and readily, despite Animal Biosafety Level 3 containment practices used for these experiments.
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ranking = 0.0019419406112337
keywords = exposure
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7/7. Probable human infection with a newly described virus in the family paramyxoviridae. The NSW Expert Group.

    After an apparently new virus in the family paramyxoviridae was isolated from pigs in August 1997, an investigation was carried out to assess its risk for humans. More than 250 persons with potential exposure to infected pigs were tested serologically. Two piggery workers with intense occupational exposure had high convalescent-phase antibody titers to this new virus. In early June 1997, both workers had an influenzalike illness with rash; serologic testing showed no alternative cause. Strong evidence indicates that the two men became ill from this new virus, but the mode of transmission from pigs to humans remains unknown.
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ranking = 1.0004854851528
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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