Cases reported "Syncope"

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1/5. Swallow syncope associated with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Swallow or deglutition syncope is a very unusual potentially lethal but treatable disorder. We report the case of a 26-year-old woman, who presented with a history of recurrent, multiple fainting episodes precipitated by swallowing. Twenty-four-hour manometry and pH recording together with continuous 24-h ECG monitoring revealed multiple episodes of symptomatic and asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and significant gastro-oesophageal reflux associated with swallowing. Oesophageal function tests and continuous electrocardiographic evaluation is important in the diagnosis of this rare condition.
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ranking = 1
keywords = deglutition
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2/5. Swallow syncope.

    Swallow syncope is a rare disorder caused by hypersensitive vagotonic reflex in response to deglutition. A 26-year-old man complained of recurrent light-headedness and near syncope on swallowing was hospitalized for monitoring and evaluation. Continuous electrocardiographic and invasive arterial pressure monitoring showed ingestion of a solid meal evoked light-headedness and complete AV block without an escape rhythm that lasted for 5.6 seconds. This patient received a Medtronic Kappa (401B) DDDR pacemaker with the rate drop feature. The patient has remained asymptomatic on follow-up for the past 2 years.
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ranking = 1
keywords = deglutition
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3/5. Swallow syncope in association with Schatzki ring and hypertensive esophageal peristalsis: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    syncope caused by swallowing-induced cardiac arrhythmia is an uncommon condition. The recognition of this syndrome is paramount but often difficult. We report three cases of deglutition syncope evaluated at our institution over a three-year period. Two patients had distal esophageal (Schatzki) ring and two had hypertensive peristaltic waves (commonly referred to as "nutcracker esophagus"), neither of which had been described before in association with deglutition syncope. Two patients underwent placement of a demand cardiac pacemaker with subsequent resolution of their syncopal symptoms, while the third patient refused any further intervention. Swallow syncope usually follows a benign course from a cardiac standpoint. Placement of a demand cardiac pacemaker can prevent recurrence of presyncopal and syncopal attacks and their untoward consequences.
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ranking = 2
keywords = deglutition
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4/5. deglutition syncope with coexistent carotid sinus hypersensitivity.

    A 63-year-old man had symptomatic deglutition-induced atrioventricular (A-V) block. There was also a coexistent mixed type carotid sinus hypersensitivity presenting as A-V block. No A-V nodal dysfunction was revealed during electrophysiologic studies. The vasodepressor response to carotid massage implies a central vagal hyperresponsiveness, which can also explain the cardioinhibitory responses to swallowing and carotid sinus massage, both possibly unmasked by posterior myocardial infarction.
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ranking = 1
keywords = deglutition
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5/5. Successful treatment of deglutition syncope with oral beta-adrenergic blockade.

    A case of deglutition syncope of 20 years' duration in a patient without cardiac or esophageal disease is presented. The therapeutic efficacy of beta-blockade is documented by symptomatic improvement, repeat esophageal balloon inflation and tilt-table testing. This suggests the Bezold-Jarisch reflex or sympathetic nervous system may be involved in the pathogenesis of deglutition syncope.
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ranking = 6
keywords = deglutition
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