Cases reported "Syndrome"

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1/2054. Increased sister chromatid exchange in bone marrow and blood cells from Bloom's syndrome.

    Bone-marrow cells from a patient with Bloom's syndrome cultured for 48 h in the presence of BudR exhibited a striking increase in the number of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in comparison to that in the marrow cells of a patient with treated polycythemia vera (PV). Thus, it appears that an increased incidence of SCE in Bloom's syndrome occurs in various differentiated types of cells, not just blood lymphocytes, and constitutes the syndrome's most characteristic cytogenetic feature. In contrast, the incidence of SCE was not increased in marrow cells and lymphocytes of the particular PV patient studied here, whose cells did exhibit increased numbers of chromatid and chromosome gaps and breaks, presumably as result of the patient's earlier treatment. An increased frequency of SCE was demonstrated in Bloom's syndrome lymphocytes using both a technique based on BudR incorporation and one based on labeling with tritated deoxycytidine. This observation constitutes evidence against the increase of SCE being due to an unusual reaction to BudR. By conventional cytogenetic techniques, chromosome instability, including chromatid and chromosome breaks, but no homologous chromatid interchanges were also recognized in Bloom's syndrome bone-marrow cells incubated in vitro (without BudR) for either 1.k or 16 h. This observation points to the existence of chromosome instability in vivo.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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2/2054. MR and CT imaging in the Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome. Report of three cases and contribution to pathogenesis and differential diagnosis.

    Cerebral hemiatrophy or Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome is a condition characterized by seizures, facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiplegia or hemiparesis, and mental retardation. These findings are due to cerebral injury that may occur early in life or in utero. The radiological features are unilateral loss of cerebral volume and associated compensatory bone alterations in the calvarium, like thickening, hyperpneumatization of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid cells and elevation of the petrous ridge. The authors describe three cases. Classical findings of the syndrome are present in variable degrees according to the extent of the brain injury. Pathogenesis is commented.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bone
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3/2054. patients with CHARGE association: a model to study saccular function in the human.

    The term CHARGE association refers to a combination of congenital malformations, the mnemonic CHARGE designating the most frequently occurring anomalies in the constellation. "C" indicates coloboma of the retina, "H" heart defects, "A" choanal atresia, "R" retarded growth and/or central nervous system anomalies, "G" genital hypoplasia, and "E" ear anomalies and/or deafness. The inner ear anomaly consists of a specific form of labyrinthine dysplasia that includes Mondini dysplasia of the pars inferior (cochlea and saccule) and complete absence of the pars superior (utricle and semicircular canals). We observed the development of a child with CHARGE association up to the age of 10 years. There was complete absence of nystagmic response to bithermal caloric and rotatory pendular stimuli. A nystagmic reaction was elicited by the off-vertical axis rotation test, indicating stimulation of the saccular macula, the sole remaining vestibular sense organ in this dysplasia. This reaffirms that the saccule is a vestibular organ, even though it is located in the pars inferior. In spite of the severe bilateral vestibular deficit and coloboma of the retina, the child was able to walk at the age of 2 years. The delay in the development of walking was not due to central nervous system anomalies, as suggested by the "R" of the acronym CHARGE, but rather, to the severe sensorineural visual and vestibular deficits.
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ranking = 18.272193704521
keywords = dysplasia
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4/2054. Epidermal naevus syndrome and hypophosphataemic rickets: description of a patient with central nervous system anomalies and review of the literature.

    The epidermal naevus syndrome (ENS) is a rare dermatological condition consisting of congenital epidermal nevi associated with anomalies in the central nervous system, bones, eyes, hear or genito-urinary system. We report a new case of ENS associated with hypophosphataemic rickets. The girl was born with a mixed-type epidermal naevus and skeletal anomalies. Hypophosphataemic rickets was diagnosed at the age of 2.5 years. At 14 years of age. MRI of the head demonstrated right brain hypotrophy, a left temporal arachnoid cyst and asymmetric lateral ventricles. We reviewed the literature and found 13 reported cases of ENS associated with hypophosphataemic rickets. Conclusion We report a further patient with epidermal naevus syndrome and hypophosphataemic rickets, followed from birth to the age of 15 years, who had structural central nervous system anomalies with normal intellectual functioning. A comprehensive neurological work up is recommended in patients with epidermal naevus syndrome.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bone
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5/2054. Two new cases of Cumming syndrome confirming autosomal recessive inheritance.

    We report on two stillborn sisters with generalized hydrops, campomelia, cervical lymphocele, and polycystic dysplasia of kidney, liver, and pancreas. This syndrome conforms to that first described by Cumming et al. [Am. J. Med. Genet. 25:783-790, 1986]. This observation provides additional support for the notion that this syndrome has an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
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ranking = 6.0907312348405
keywords = dysplasia
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6/2054. The fourth-compartment syndrome: its anatomical basis and clinical cases.

    We propose a new term, the "fourth-compartment syndrome" to describe chronic dorsal wrist pain of the fourth compartment. Five main causes responsible for this syndrome are thought to be as follows: 1. Ganglion involvement, including an occult ganglion; 2. Extensor digitorum brevis manus muscle; 3. Abnormal extensor indicis muscle; 4. Tenosynovialitis; 5. Anomaly or deformity of carpal bones. Should the above mentioned conditions occur in the fourth compartment, pressure within the fourth compartment increases, ultimately compressing the posterior interosseous nerve directly or indirectly. Anatomical studies of the fourth compartment of the wrist and the posterior interosseous nerve are presented and the fourth-compartment syndrome is summarized with twelve clinical cases (six cases of occult ganglions, two cases of extensor digitorum brevis manus, two cases of tenosynovialitis, one case of abnormal extensor indicis muscle, and one case of carpal bossing).
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bone
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7/2054. Surgical treatment of a case of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-bursts associated with focal cortical dysplasia.

    We report a surgically treated case of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE) with suppression-bursts associated with focal cortical dysplasia. Tonic-clonic seizures followed by a series of spasms occurred about a hundred times a day at a few days of age. Interictal electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed a suppression-burst pattern that was predominant in the left hemisphere. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested focal cortical dysplasia in the left prefrontal area. Combination therapies with antiepileptic treatments showed only partial efficacy. The patient underwent lesionectomy at age 4 months, after which he gradually showed psychomotor development and a decrease of spasms to 0-2 series daily. In cases of EIEE with focal cortical dysplasia, surgical treatment may have beneficial effects on both psychomotor development and seizure control.
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ranking = 42.635118643883
keywords = dysplasia
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8/2054. Bilateral basal ganglial necrosis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in a child with Kostmann syndrome.

    A 6-year-old girl underwent allogeneic BMT from a matched sibling donor for the treatment of Kostmann syndrome. She suddenly became drowsy on day 30 after BMT, and lost consciousness 2 days later. Cranial CT scan showed symmetrical lesions suggesting bilateral necrosis in the basal ganglia. Clinical and laboratory investigations failed to reveal any evidence of neurometabolic disease.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = bone
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9/2054. Cell-mediated immunity in epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    Investigations were performed in 6 cases of epidermodysplasia verruciformis and 2 healthy family members. Nonspecific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was studied by measuring response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin a (Con A), percentrages of E- and EAC-rosette-forming lymphocytes, bacterial skin tests, and allergic reactions to dinitrochloro-benzene (DNCB). Impairment of CMI was manifested by reduction in the percentage of E rosettes, and lowered response to PHA, and- to a lesser degree- to Con A. The immune response to DNCB sensitization was invariably negative. Impairment of CMI was greater in cases of long duration and with extensive lesions. The cases of similar duration and extent of lesions, which never showed tendency to tumor formation, were not different in CMI in comparison with cases with numerous tumors. Only in cases with very advanced tumors CMI was impaired parallel to the gravity of the patient's general condition.
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ranking = 30.453656174202
keywords = dysplasia
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10/2054. Renal function studies in an infant with 4p (-) syndrome.

    An infant with the syndrome of deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 is described. In addition, this child had renal insufficiency, which is found rarely in association with the 4p(--) syndrome. Previous reports of this syndrome have described only isolated gross structural abnormalites of the urinary tract. In the case discussed here, we present clinical and functional data which indicate that this patient had bilateral renal dysplasia.
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ranking = 6.0907312348405
keywords = dysplasia
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