Cases reported "Tachycardia, Ventricular"

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1/178. safety of antiarrhythmics during pregnancy: case report and review of the literature.

    A young woman is reported with intractable sustained ventricular tachycardia thought to originate in the right ventricle, which was treated successfully with encainide after failure to respond to beta-blockers and several class IA antiarrhythmic agents. She became pregnant twice while on encainide and gave birth to two healthy children. This is the first report of pregnancy during treatment with encainide. A literature review showed no other reported case of encainide taken during pregnancy, but several reports of the safe use of flecainide, a similar class IC drug, during pregnancy. Other antiarrhythmics are also reviewed.
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2/178. ST segment elevation in the right precordial leads induced with class IC antiarrhythmic drugs: insight into the mechanism of brugada syndrome.

    We evaluated two patients without previous episodes of syncope who showed characteristic ECG changes similar to brugada syndrome following administration of Class IC drugs, flecainide and pilsicainide, but not following Class IA drugs. Patient 1 had frequent episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation resistant to Class IA drugs. After treatment with flecainide, the ECG showed a marked ST elevation in leads V2 and V3, and the coved-type configuration of ST segment in lead V2. A signal-averaged ECG showed late potentials that became more prominent after flecainide. Pilsicainide, a Class IC drug, induced the same ST segment elevation as flecainide, but procainamide did not. Patient 2 also had frequent episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Pilsicainide changed atrial fibrillation to atrial flutter with 2:1 ventricular response, and the ECG showed right bundle branch block and a marked coved-type ST elevation in leads V1 and V2. After termination of atrial flutter, ST segment elevation in leads V1 and V2 continued. In this patient, procainamide and quinidine did not induce this type of ECG change. In conclusion, strong Na channel blocking drugs induce ST segment elevation similar to brugada syndrome even in patients without any history of syncope or ventricular fibrillation.
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3/178. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of coexistent atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia and left ventricular tachycardia originating in the left anterior fascicle.

    Coexistence of supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia is rare. A patient with no structural heart disease and wide QRS complex tachycardia with a right bundle block configuration and right-axis deviation underwent electrophysiological examination. A concealed left atrioventricular pathway (AP) was found, and atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT) and left ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating in or close to the anterior fascicle of the left ventricle were both induced. Radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of the concealed left AP was successfully performed. Ten months later, VT recurred and was successfully ablated using a local Purkinje potential as a guide. Coexistent AVRT and idiopathic VT originating from within or near the left anterior fascicle were successfully ablated.
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4/178. Left posterior fascicular tachycardia: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    A wide QRS complex tachycardia with right bundle-branch block morphology and left axis deviation observed in a young patient without structural heart disease may pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The surface ECG may provide several diagnostic clues to make a correct diagnosis of left posterior fascicular tachycardia and may help to differentiate it from both a supraventricular tachycardia with aberrant conduction and a typical ventricular tachycardia related to coronary artery disease. Although this tachycardia is sensitive to verapamil, this medication may probably cause transient infertility in males. The presence of a Purkinje potential preceding the QRS complex during tachycardia and optimal pace mapping may guide radio-frequency ablation resulting in a definite cure.
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5/178. hypokalemia with syncope caused by habitual drinking of oolong tea.

    A 61-year-old woman developed hypokalemia, atrioventricular block and ventricular tachycardia with syncope after habitual drinking 2 to 3 liters of oolong tea per day. She had been suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and sjogren's syndrome and her serum albumin was decreased (2.9 g/dl). Oolong tea contains caffeine at approximately 20 mg/dl. Great quantities of caffeine can induce hypokalemia. The serum protein binding caffeine is albumin. Accordingly, in patients with hypoalbuminemia, caffeine is apt to induce hypokalemia. This case suggested that great quantities of oolong tea, one of the so-called "healthy" drinks, result in serious symptoms for patients with hypoalbuminemia.
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6/178. Transient complete atrioventricular block provoked by ventricular pacing in a patient with nonsustained ventricular tachycardia.

    A 75-year-old woman with complete left bundle branch block underwent electrophysiological study (EPS) to assess the conduction in the His-Purkinje conduction system and to further investigate the electrical instability in the ventricle, which was suggestive by the findings of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in ambulatory monitoring. Transient complete atrioventricular (AV) block was provoked by ventricular pacing, and the intracardiac recordings proved that the site of AV block was distal to the His bundle. This phenomenon was not related to the rate or the duration of the ventricular pacing. The transient impairment of the conduction appeared to be due to the fatigue phenomenon in the His-Purkinje system.
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7/178. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of idiopathic right ventricular tachycardia near the His bundle.

    There are only a few reports on successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of idiopathic right ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from other sites than right ventricular outflow tract. We report here a case of VT which exhibited an inferior-axis and a left bundle branch block pattern and originated near the His bundle. Using the temperature-controlled ablation catheter, prudent observation of the fluoroscopy and intracardiac electrograms during pacemapping, we successfully ablated the origin of the VT without any conduction disturbance. However, further study is required to determine the effectiveness of catheter ablation and the long term prognosis for this type of VT.
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8/178. Idiopathic verapamil-sensitive left ventricular tachycardia complicated by right ventricular outflow tract ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation.

    Idiopathic ventricular tachycardias (VTs) are generally divided into those arising from the right ventricle and those arising from the left ventricle. There has been few reports of two morphologically distinct VT occurring in patients with no apparent structural heart disease. We report a patient with verapamil-sensitive left VT with a right bundle branch block pattern that spontaneously changed to VT with a left bundle branch block pattern. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by the application of programmed stimulation. Although it is unclear if our patient with pleomorphic VT has ventricular vulnerability, it is necessary to investigate further and follow him carefully.
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9/178. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of left ventricular outflow tract tachycardia from the coronary cusp: a new approach to the tachycardia focus.

    INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) is rare. Previously reported were two cases of LVOT tachycardia which were treated with radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation through endocardial aortomitral continuity. We report here a case of a repetitive LVOT tachycardia in which the QRS morphology during VT exhibited an atypical left bundle branch block and inferior axis. Pace mapping revealed that the origin of this VT was very close to the left sinus of valsalva. Transcoronary cusp RF catheter ablation abolished the VT in this patient and is a new approach for the treatment of this kind of VT. The application of this approach to the other types of VT has yet to be determined.
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10/178. Spontaneous resolution of ventricular arrhythmias with left bundle branch block morphology and abnormal endomyocardial biopsy.

    Four children presenting with ventricular tachycardia with a left bundle branch block morphology were evaluated and found to have structurally normal hearts but abnormal endomyocardial biopsies. All four children had spontaneous resolution of their ventricular rhythm abnormalities during follow-up.
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